logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: philosophers
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-09-24 12:22
Bring back the 20ies
Flappers and Philosophers - F. Scott Fitzgerald

Flappers and Philosophers is a collection of 8 short stories written by Fitzgerald (as a matter of fact, it is the first collection of short stories written by him). For some reason I am much more drawn to shorter, more compact writings at the moment – maybe that’s what I got from spending every day for over a month working on Čechov. I don’t know.

 

Although Flappers and Philosophers has it’s many flaws, Fitzgeralds writing is – for the most part – immensely beautiful. I was originally thinking about making a collection instead of a review, giving you the most beautiful sentence of each story, but then – who am I to decide.

 

My problem with many of the stories was that there was hardly a character to relate to. All of the selfish, superficial and snobbish girls and boys (excuse me, I meant ladies and gentlemen) acted like spoiled and bored kids and most of them felt the same, especially the female characters – and the fact that almost every single one of them has grey eyes did not help either (at the same time I am aware of the fact that Fitzgerald was obviously trying to portrait exactly THIS kind of person, so I cannot blame him for that).

 

Now, overall, there are certain elements that will definitely stick with me, but somehow Flappers and Philosophers left me unsatisfied. I guess, I was expecting something less superficial and more elaborate, if that makes any sense at all regarding short stories.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2017-09-23 13:42
Reading progress update: I've read 167 out of 216 pages.
Flappers and Philosophers - F. Scott Fitzgerald

Well, well, well.

A lot was happening for me in the past weeks, so reading for fun was taking the back seat, but I think I am getting back on track now.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2017-08-24 11:32
Reading progress update: I've read 35 out of 216 pages.
Flappers and Philosophers - F. Scott Fitzgerald

"Lie to me by the moonlight. Do a fabulous story."

 

…and what a fabulous story The Offshore Pirate is!

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2016-07-05 20:02
Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone (Review)
Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone - J.K. Rowling

When my friend Chris discovered I’d thrown in the towel on the Harry Potter books years ago, there was a whirlwind of disbelief. And, long story short, I went home for the summer with a copy of his book in my duffle bag and a promise to actually read the whole series, even if it was just to say that I had. So, here you go, Chris. I finished the first book! (Which you know happened a long time ago, but here’s the long overdue review.)

 

The thing is, I just didn’t enjoy the books that I did read. I tried when I was fourteen or fifteen, and the writing just didn’t do it for me. I love the movies to death, so it’s not the story or the characters that turned me away from the books; I’m just very particular about writing style. It’s always terrified me a little to go back to them—because Harry Potter is very dear to a lot of people, and, to be honest, I was slightly afraid that if I didn’t like it and wrote a less-than-glowing review, I might get bombarded. But I’m just going to hold my breath and hit the “post” button anyway and let the chips fall where they may. And while it wasn’t as bad as I remembered it, I’m still not totally sold—though I’m aware that it’s supposed to be a children’s story and (hopefully) Rowling’s writing matures in the later books.

 

The first book, for me, was okay. I wasn’t necessarily hooked, but it wasn’t bad either. I do think they’ll get better as I go, which I’m looking forward to, and I’m glad I finally went back to it, even if just to satisfy the completionist in me.

 

What I Liked: Spoilers!

Read more
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
quote 2016-03-03 14:09
“Whenever there was an upheaval in some foreign land, there would be a procession of refugees from that land filing through Emmanuel's pulpit, with quivers full of piety, singing ballads of a sad and lowering sort like 'Russia, Holy Russia, I will die to set you free', and telling a sackful of stories about their narrow escape from the grip of the half-dozen or so godless persecutors who were at the bottom of all this trouble.”

The Dark Philosophers (Library of Wales) - Gwyn Thomas,Elaine Morgan

― Gwyn Thomas The Dark Philosophers

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?