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review 2018-05-25 16:53
3 Out Of 5 "Colonized Mars" STARS
Red Rising - Pierce Brown,Tim Gerard Reynolds

 

 

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~BOOK BLURB~

Red Rising

Pierce Brown

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Darrow is a Red, a member of the lowest caste in the color-coded society of the future. Like his fellow Reds, he works all day, believing that he and his people are making the surface of Mars livable for future generations.

 

Yet he spends his life willingly, knowing that his blood and sweat will one day result in a better world for his children.

 

But Darrow and his kind have been betrayed. Soon he discovers that humanity already reached the surface generations ago. Vast cities and sprawling parks spread across the planet. Darrow—and Reds like him—are nothing more than slaves to a decadent ruling class.

 

Inspired by a longing for justice, and driven by the memory of lost love, Darrow sacrifices everything to infiltrate the legendary Institute, a proving ground for the dominant Gold caste, where the next generation of humanity's overlords struggle for power. He will be forced to compete for his life and the very future of civilization against the best and most brutal of Society's ruling class. There, he will stop at nothing to bring down his enemies... even if it means he has to become one of them to do so.

 

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~MY QUICKIE REVIEW~

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I took forever to finish this, the audio was difficult to understand…and when I remembered that I had actually purchased this in eBook format, I started reading while listening.  Which helped, but still, it was really difficult for me to stay in the story.  For me Red Rising is plagued with too many characters, plot lines I couldn't always follow and a difficult to discern accent.

 

 This had the potential to be epic, and yet I only felt a smattering of that epic-ness.  The last two-thirds of the book involves some sort competition that I didn't really comprehend why they were doing it in the first place…like what was the point of it?  I believe, if I continue this series, I need to actually read the book and skip the audio.

 

๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏

~MY RATING~

3STARS - GRADE=C

๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏๏

 

 

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~BREAKDOWN OF RATINGS~

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Plot~ 3/5

Main Characters~ 4/5

Secondary Characters~ 3.5/5

The Feels~ 3.5/5

Pacing~ 3/5

Addictiveness~ 3/5

Theme or Tone~ 3.5/5

Flow (Writing Style)~ 1.5/5

Backdrop (World Building)~ 3/5

Originality~ 3.5/5

Ending~ 3/5 Cliffhanger~ "to be continued"

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Book Cover~ Meh…

Narration~  2.5 -Gerard Reynolds…I really didn't like this narration.

Series~ Red Rising #1

Setting~ Mars

Source~ Audiobook (Library)

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review 2018-05-06 17:16
Blown. Away.
Red Rising - Pierce Brown

A funny thing happened a couple of chapters into Red Rising. See, it didn’t go in a direction I expected based on the synopsis, and just like that, I was hooked. (Gee, an author who is cleverer than the reader, go figure.)

 

Red Rising is phenomenal. Sure, it’s drawing on similar dystopian tropes as The Hunger Games and Divergent, but Brown has created a unique Martian society with its color-based class system and specific lingo. And while technically, the characters are YA, it’s not billed as YA, as is the case with Game of Thrones with its teen main cast, so those of you not into that genre, you’re safe. 

 

Being book 1 in a series about an uprising, obviously our MC, Darrow, is going to have to infiltrate the upper class and prove himself in his first test. Nothing ground breaking about the structure, but the fun and freshness of this compelling story is all in how Brown handles it. It’s a great task with epic amounts of struggle, adventure, and betrayal.

I can’t wait to get to see more of this world and more of Darrow and his band, all of whom are sneakily clever. And since the author did such a great job building relationships, it’s going to be both highly enjoyable and heartbreaking watching them being torn apart when Darrow must take their ruling class down.

 

This was an edge-of-my-seat read, and now, if you’ll excuse me, I need to dive in to book 2.

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review 2018-02-16 03:02
What follows Darrow's Rising?
Iron Gold - Pierce Brown
. . . We didn't prepare for this."

“How do you prepare for a kick in the balls?” I say. “You don’t. You suck it up.”

"That supposed to inspire me?. . .


Darrow's words about the mission he and the Howlers are ill-prepared for also apply to readers of Pierce Brown books. At some point, you have to suck it up and keep moving. I typically considered Brown's writing to be full of gut-punches, but Darrow's anatomical metaphor applies, too. Yeah, we love the books, and Brown makes sure the experience is almost as harrowing for the readers as it is for the characters.

 

After President Snow dies, after Tris finishes with the Factions, after The Matrix reboots, after The Emperor Dies and the teddy bears sing, "Yub nub, eee chop yub nub," what happens? (well, thanks to J. J. Abrams, we have an idea about that last one) Iron Gold lets us see what happens 10 years after the events of Morning Star.

 

The Republic is still at war, trying to finish off the remnants of the old order -- the Senate isn't rubber stamping Darrow's requests and that is proving problematic. The people are tired of the bloodshed and want the focus to move to strengthening the fledgling government. Driving Darrow to a last-ditch and dramatic gesture. The lives of the Reds on Mars is technically better, they're technically free, but things aren't much better -- in fact, they may be less safe. Criminals on Lune are doing well, but those who served during the War are still trying to deal with the trauma they survived. Meanwhile, on the far end of the solar system, some exiles from Lune are looking to regain some prominence. Brown jumps around from story to story, between various perspectives, surveying the wreckage of the Society and the birth of the Republic.

 

Each character is as well-drawn, and fully developed, as sympathetic as those who came before in the series -- even those who are critical of Darrow/the Republic (if not downright opposed to it). This is a more complicated world than the one we last saw. I'm going to keep things pretty vague and not go further than this, because half of the joy of this book is in the exploration.

 

Jumping from perspective to perspective, between storylines that have almost nothing to do with each other make for a lesser novel than the previous books in the series. When I was following a character -- their story was gripping, I was interested and invested -- but the instant the perspective shifted? It was all about the new story/perspective and I pretty much forgot about the previous. Darrow's story was the exception, but I attribute that to my long-standing connection to Darrow, Sevro and the rest. I loved the conclusion of Darrow's story -- because of what it means for Darrow and the rest, and what it means for the next book in the series (saga?).

 

I'm glad we got this look at the aftermath of the Rising -- if we were going to get anything at all -- it seems right for things to be this way. I wasn't as invested in this novel as I was in the previous ones, but I'm just as invested in this world. I hope the next one will grab me better, but until then I wait on tenterhooks and with hope that Darrow and the rest will deliver the goods. This is not the place to jump on the series -- go back toe Red Rising and start from the beginning, it's worth it. For those who've been with man from his harrowing beginning through his even more harrowing and devastating triumphs, this is a must read.

 

2018 Library Love Challenge

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review 2018-02-03 00:00
Pierce Brown's Red Rising: Sons of Ares
Pierce Brown's Red Rising: Sons of Ares ... Pierce Brown's Red Rising: Sons of Ares - Pierce Brown I’m not a fan of the Red Rising novel series. I think it’s safe to state that seeing that I’ve never successfully made it through the first book without falling asleep. I want to like it – there’s no reason I shouldn’t like it- but the audible version just hits my snooze button instantly. For me, with the trouble sleeping I have, that’s not actually a bad thing, but it doesn’t bode well for my opinion of the book. So… I knew I was taking a risk in checking out Red Rising: Sons of Ares. However, I hoped the graphic novel format would keep my attention a bit better. I was right. I thoroughly enjoyed Red Rising: Sons of Ares Vol 1.

The writing in Sons of Ares is well-done. The story told was surprisingly engaging (though to be honest it did take a couple of issues before I got fully involved with it). I wasn’t expecting to find myself rooting for Fitchner and Brynn, but by the end of the novel I was goggle-eyed at what I thought was going to happen. There might have been a few swears and threats made in the direction of the pages a few times.

Speaking of swears… I wasn’t a fan of the fact that some had apparently taken a black marker to the curse words, though. I mean, if you’re old enough to read about graphic violence that involves people getting limbs cut off, I think you can handle a dirty word or two. Especially given that right after a few swears are marked out, there’s threats of ‘sack’ removal. Someone’s priorities are a bit sideways, yeah?

The pacing for Red Rising: Sons of Ares was great. There was the perfect amount of action. The dialogue was believable. The plot was interesting and I was happy by the end of the volume because I felt like it had been a solid mini story arc. I didn’t like Fitchner, but I don’t feel like I was supposed to like him either. I did like Brynn, though, and there were a few panels that had me cheering her.

My only issue with the graphic novel was the art. The quick, sketchy art style always looks to me like they were more concerned with pushing the issues out rather than taking their time and doing it properly. I’m aware some people like it and feel that it suits the story. I’m not one of them. So I really think it’s just personal preference.

Overall, Red Rising: Sons of Ares is a captivating story that managed to keep my attention even when the art did nothing for me. I know it’s a prequel, but given that I haven’t managed to read the books themselves, I can’t say if it gives any spoilers for the series.

It’s worth checking out.


Disclaimer: I received a copy of this from Edelweiss for review consideration.
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url 2018-01-23 12:58
"Cold Hands: Warm Reads" in Science Fiction
The Sea Beast Takes a Lover: Stories - Michael Andreasen
Redwood - Mark Z. Danielewski
Thrawn (Star Wars) - Timothy Zahn
Artemis: A Novel - Andy Weir
The Gone World - Thomas Sweterlitsch
Gnomon - Nick Harkaway
Iron Gold - Pierce Brown
Adventure: The Atari 2600 Game Journal - Atari

List is from publishing house Penguin Random House's email newsletter.

Source: forms.em.penguinrandomhouse.com/ats/msg.aspx?sg1=6f3147f6c4cd8e0d831165f5f45b3b2d&ref=PRHAB653FE4CC3C&linkid=PRHAB653FE4CC3C&cdi=23CF0F9E33762BF3E0534FD66B0A902E&template_id=8102&aid=randohouseinc49531-20
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