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text 2018-01-03 19:40
Blog Tour & Giveaway for GOING GONE by Anita Dickason
 
Going Gone!
by Anita Dickason 
GENRE:  Political Suspense/Thriller
 
 
 
 
Code Name Trackers: The elite of the elite. FBI agents, each with a secret, an extraordinary ability that defies reason and logic.
 
An intricate scheme to kidnap the children of high-ranking politicians on Capitol Hill gets disrupted when private investigator Kerry Branson rescues one of the victims.
 
Teamed with FBI Tracker Ryan Barr, they discover the plot extends to the Office of the President and—the horrific plan has drug cartels and terrorist cells lined up to cash in.
 
 
 
Though they had spoken on the phone, Scott had never met Arthur Larkin. Close to sixty years of age, he looked ten years younger and was the exception to the rule presidents aged quickly. At six-foot, one-eighty, with streaks of gray in the dark hair, he had a commanding presence. He walked around the desk to shake hands with Scott.
 
A door opened, and Director of Homeland Security, Vance Whitaker, walked in. Whitaker greeted Scott as the President motioned the two Directors to a sofa and Scott to a chair before settling on the other couch. The fact he was seated in front of them didn’t escape Scott’s notice. I’m the man in the hot seat. Perched on the edge of his chair, unable to relax, trepidation over the outcome of the meeting had his heart racing and nerves tingling.
 
Larkin said, “Scott, I’ve received several reports regarding your extraordinary ability in resolving difficult cases. I’m sure you are aware the carte blanche given to your new command is unprecedented in the history of the FBI. When Director Daykin first broached the concept for the Trackers Unit, I must say I was skeptical, but his articulate arguments convinced me.” The President stopped to look at Daykin, who smiled and nodded his head in agreement.
 
Turning back to Scott, Larkin said, “This current situation is unparalleled. Where do we stand on the investigation?”
 
Showtime—would he still have a job when he walked out the door?
 
 
 
 
 
 
Award winning author, Anita Dickason, is a retired Dallas Police Officer. Anita served as a patrol officer, undercover narcotics officer, advanced accident investigator, and SWAT entry/sniper.
Upon retirement, she became involved in a research project that dealt with the death of a witness to the Kennedy assassination. The research led to her first book, JFK Assassination Eyewitness: Rush to Conspiracy, that details the results of her reconstruction of the 1966 motor vehicle accident that killed Lee Bowers, Jr.
The project jump-started a new career as an author and publisher, and she started a new business: Mystic Circle Books & Designs, LLC.
 
As an author, her fictional works are suspense/thrillers with a touch of paranormal and romance. Characters with unexpected skills, that extra edge for overcoming danger and adversity, have always intrigued her. Adding an infatuation with ancient myths and legends of Native American Indians, and Scottish and Irish folklore creates the backdrop for her characters.
As a publisher, her diverse background has proven to be an invaluable asset. Assisting other authors to publish their works utilizes the gamut of her experience. Graphics design has become one of her favorite endeavors.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Anita will be awarding a $25 Amazon GC to a randomly drawn winner via rafflecopter during the tour.
 
 
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review 2017-12-20 20:46
Thinking ahead
The Great Questions of Tomorrow (TED Books) - David Rothkopf

Have you guys ever watched a TED Talk? Well, apparently some of those Ted Talks are turned into published works so that the ideas can be delved into a little deeper. (To see more you can visit their website here. (They haven't asked me to review today's book by the way.)) I hadn't watched David Rothkopf's talk but The Great Questions of Tomorrow was featured in my regular 'what's new at Simon & Schuster' email and it seemed to be calling my name. Rothkopf is exploring a very wide and diverse range of topics with a central theme of  'what does this mean for the future?' running through them all. I guess it should come as no surprise that this book thoroughly freaked me out while at the same time fascinating me. Have you thought about the future of drone warfare and whether or not it might constitute the necessity for intelligent machines to have rights as members of society? WELL, NOW YOU ARE. He jumped from frightening scenarios like that to ones that hadn't even occurred to me such as complete mobile banking which would see the demise of physical currency and brick and mortar banks. O_O I especially enjoyed his take on government and how we should be trying to elect leaders who not only understand technology but can look towards the future to prepare accordingly. His example of how this was not done was that just because there was one shoe bomber it shouldn't mean we have to remove our shoes at airports into perpetuity. All in all, it was a fascinating read that I zipped right through. It's great for the people in your life (or yourself!) that enjoy philosophical discussions about the future and how actions of today and yesterday have and should continue to have direct bearing on how we handle events in the future. 10/10

 

Rothkopf's original TED Talk "How fear drives American politics"

 

 

What's Up Next: Find the Good: Unexpected Life Lessons From a Small-Town Obituary Writer by Heather Lende

 

What I'm Currently Reading: Mine Own Execution by Nigel Balchin

Source: readingfortheheckofit.blogspot.com
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text 2017-12-15 13:48
Reading progress update: I've read 153 out of 448 pages.
Ambition, Pragmatism, and Party: A Political Biography of Gerald R. Ford - Scott Barry Kaufman

This is proving to be a straightforward, workmanlike study of Ford's political career. It may not be on the level of Caro's "The Years of Lyndon Johnson," but it's definitely giving me the overview of America's 38th president that I've long wanted to read.

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review 2017-12-06 00:57
A River of Darkness by Masaji Ishikawa
A River in Darkness: One Man's Escape from North Korea - Masaji Ishikawa,Risa Kobayashi,Martin Brown A compelling journey that was both horrifying and heart-breaking! This one was hard to put down; I read it in one sitting. An eyewitness look into the North Korea behind the façade that it likes to portray.
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review 2017-12-01 16:09
Little boys at war
The Red Badge of Courage - Stephen Crane,Alfred Kazin

Today's book is a classic that I have wanted to read for quite some time but never got around to...until now. Stephen Crane's The Red Badge of Courage covers the American Civil War from the point of view of a Union soldier. It's the gritty portrayal of life at the front and just what it's like to lay down your life for a cause that you don't fully understand. In fact, our protagonist has almost no clue what it is that he's fighting for or against. He joined up because it was the done thing which seems to be the case for the rest of his regiment as well. There are those that brag about their bravado but when the time comes for the bullets to fly they are the first to turn and run. At first, our soldier is condescending towards these 'cowards' as he sees them but he very quickly sees the futility of their regiment's actions as they seem to be merely feinting and arbitrarily gaining and losing ground. It is a gritty, raw description of battle and defeat which is undercut with confusion and fear. These are children playacting warfare but the injuries and death are very real. Crane's insistence on not holding back lends a realistic, deadening of the senses feel to what it's like on the battlefield when you are surrounded by death and horror at every turn. He was making a commentary on the futility of war and how those who are a part of the 'war machine' are generally lost as to the meaning of why and who they are fighting. I am immensely glad that I finally picked this book up and gave it a read. I encourage ya'll to do the same. It's a slim volume and will take no time at all (though I don't promise you'll want a break every now and again from the bloodshed). 9/10

 

Here are a few more covers which I thought were worth sharing because they tell slightly different stories (and illustrate the point that covers do matter):

 

This one screams patriotism. Source: Goodreads

 

 

Yes, that is a bald eagle. [Source: Waldina]

 

 

Just so you get the message. [Source: Goodreads]

 

 

And my fave because RAINBOW. [Source: Amazon]

 

What's Up Next: Science of the Magical: From the Holy Grail to Love Potions to Superpowers by Matt Kaplan

 

What I'm Currently Reading: Slightly Foxed: Issues 50-53

Source: readingfortheheckofit.blogspot.com
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