logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: quantum-physics
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-01-15 15:13
Real Quanta: Simplifying Quantum Physics for Einstein and Bohr
Real Quanta: Simplifying Quantum Physics for Einstein and Bohr - Martijn van Calmthout

by Martijn van Calmthout

 

Non-fiction

 

This is a book about Einstein and how his theories have extrapolated into Quantum Physics. It's written in an accessible way, much like a novel, though it does read a little dry at times.

 

The author places himself in a scene where he is interviewing the famous scientists Einstein and Bohr and explains within that context some of the prevailing theories of Physics that came from their studies and ideas. This is definitely a book for people who are very interested in these theories, but for those of us in that category it is amazingly easy to follow and the fictional aspect of the 'interview' seems like a little fun.

 

This would also be a good book for a student about to study Physics who might find it intimidating. There are no equations to decipher, just theory on a philosophical level that any reasonably intelligent person could follow.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-10-14 21:30
Entangled Strings: "Theories of Everything" by Frank Close
Theories of Everything: Ideas in Profile - Frank Close
I’ve got a theory that the rules of the universe ARE created by people thinking up theories about it. Although due to elitism bias, i am yet to receive any funding for my groundbreaking “hypothesis.” Fucking scientist bastards, getting paid for thinking about stuff they think I can’t understand... what a scam.
 
I suspect that a lot of the hostility and rejection of science by people who can't understand it is because it makes them feel stupid. It is, after all, fundamental to understanding how the world works. Some people are scientists; some people are not, but know what science is; but some people not only don't understand science, but don't know that they don't know, because they can't even see it. This is a bit analogous to being able to read. Some can go into a library and read in a few languages, some only in one, others can know what books are but not be able to read, and some don't actually know what books are and feel stupid, so pretend that they either don't exist or are some sort of conspiracy against them, which makes them feel important. There are theories around which involved such complex mathematics only a handful of people in the entire world can understand them. Peer review not much use here and enter this new age of egg-heads trying to “out-complexify” each other.
 
 
If you're into Physics and Loop Quantum Gravity, read on.
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2016-11-23 05:38
The Quantum Age by Brian Clegg
The Quantum Age: How the Physics of the Very Small has Transformed Our Lives - Brian Clegg

Brain Clegg has written an interesting, if somewhat light, look at the origins, nature and uses of quantum physics.  Easy to read and understand.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2016-06-13 02:15

When I'm not writing fiction I'm often out walking and pondering the nature of consciousness. This video makes the point that Quantum Physics proves that consciousness brings material reality into being. It then hodge-podges its way into a discussion of how the brain creates consciousness. So how can material reality and consciousness mutually create each other? 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2016-04-10 01:11
Not yet convinced
The Self-Aware Universe: How Consciousness Creates the Material World - Amit Goswami, With Maggie Goswami, Foreword by Fred Alan Wolf

Here's a dilemma: Most psychologists are materialists and consider thoughts and consciousness to be epiphenomena. An epiphenomena is one that occurs parallel to the phenomena under study. It's there, but psychologists can't measure it like behavior, or treat it like a physical object. It's ephemeral, and undescribed. Materialists deal with matter, and thoughts aren't that. Whatever thoughts may be, they are not something that materialists are comfortable with examining.

 

Quantum physics presents a picture of reality that is very different than the one   presented by classical, Newtonian physics. Although quantum physics was born over a century ago, some scientists cling to the materialism that grew out of pre-quantum, Newtonian physics. This works well for describing reality most of the time, but occasionally it biases what we consider possible, or restricts our methods of inquiry.

 

Quantum physics has called traditional materialism into question, and Amit Goswami questions materialist explanations of consciousness as well. Quantum physics proves that observers can't be separated from observations. Before an observation is made, little can be said about atomic particles--they only exist as probability waves. Only when observation collapses a probability wave, creating a measurement, can anything certain be said about particles. This finding has baffled many and continues to do so. Goswami believes it implies that consciousness is a force in nature. As such, consciousness is unitary in nature, however people experience themselves as individuals and only occasionally become aware of the One that they are expressions of. For hundreds of years religious mystics have sought direct experience of the One through prayer, meditation, fasting, sitting vigils, etc. For mystics, direct experience constitutes proof. For scientists, experimental results are required.

 

Goswami provides no experimental proof. He doesn't even suggest an experimental path to test his theory. Physicists critical of String Theory acknowledge its elegance, but complain that it lacks testability. Goswami's theory is likewise elegant but lacking testability. He suggests that proof may come through paranormal research, but much of that research is highly controversial. Too many paranormal-leaning scientists have accepted results that stage magicians have easily refuted. In the end, Goswami's ideas are more suggestive than explanatory. I'd recommend another book with a more convincing explanation of consciousness, but I haven't found it yet.

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?