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photo 2017-04-27 18:31

Well, barring the seconds it took me to screenshot and post.  Find your start time at http://www.timeanddate.com/worldclock/fixedtime.html?msg=April+2017+Dewey%27s+24+Hour+Readathon&iso=20170429T08&p1=179&ah=23&am=5

Source: www.timeanddate.com/worldclock/fixedtime.html?msg=April+2017+Dewey%27s+24+Hour+Readathon&iso=20170429T08&p1=179&ah=23&am=55
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review 2017-04-27 16:56
A Find Yourself on Your Dreams Romance
The Wild Woman's Guide to Traveling the World: A Novel - Kristin Rockaway

Travel, love, happiness, dreams and real life.
Sophie did everything right, college, career, savings, her plan set and followed. She works at one of the top businesses in NY and gets to travel, her dream. She take a semi vacation with a childhood friend where everything starts crumbling in her oh so ordered and controlled life. She is dumped, found and released for some deep soul searching and adventures that will lead her to a HEA ? yes there is one, this is not a downer read.
I enjoy my wanderlust and I love reading about other's travels nearly as much as my own. This novel was so well written it read almost like a travel memoir in parts it was so vivid and alive in the descriptions. I was surprised to find it held a message, a lesson for living a wonderful life. The romance was toe curling, the jerks were class A jerks, the side characters all well developed. I admit to be a bit disappointed int he beginning by some choices being made, but, well read it for the but, you'll see. Overall a really enjoyable read, a great summer vacation book

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review 2017-04-27 04:18
The Girl Who Was Taken
The Girl Who Was Taken - Charlie Donlea

By:  Charlie Donlea

ISBN: 1496701003

Publisher:  Kensington

Publication Date: 4/25/2017 

Format: Hardcover

My Rating:  3.5 Stars

 

Charlie Donlea returns following his debut, Summit Lake with THE GIRL WHO WAS TAKEN – a disturbing, and evil sadistic game of kidnapping and abduction goes bad. The Capture Club. More than one monster? An abandoned haunted subdivision Stellar Heights. A psychopath. Lies and secrets. A sister who will not give up.

Set in a small southeastern town of North Carolina (not in an area worthy of scenery or landmarks), we meet a rebellious teen. A selfish, self-centered girl who is out of control. However, she has cried wolf too many times. Now she really needs help and it may be too late for saving.

Flashing back and forth, we learn of two girls who go missing. Megan McDonald and Nichole Cutty. Megan was taken, the daughter of Emerson Bay’s Sherriff in the summer of 2016. Nichole was taken about the same time. Megan goes free. Nichole is still missing.

One year later, Megan is out with a book, called Missing. A so-called true story account of her abduction and courageous escape. Did the killer let her go, or did she escape? Does she remember the events or has she repressed the horrific events?

However, turns out Megan is not forthcoming about the real truths of her abduction. It was a front to keep people at bay. She had been on her way to Duke University. Everyone wanted to know the morbid details of her captivity. She needed to be a success story. Her abductor had let her go.

Nichole was still missing. What happened to Nichole and what is Megan hiding?

“A life might end, but sometimes their case lives forever.” - Gerald Colt, MC

Donlea spends most of the book featuring Livia Cutty, the sister of Nichole. She chose forensics as a career because someday her parents would get the call that her sister’s body had been found. There would be questions about what happened to her and what they did to her. She needed to be the person to gather those answers. She chose to take a position in Raleigh, NC, close to where she grew up in Emerson Bay. Livia, a pathologist was happy to be a part of a well-funded program run by Dr. Gerland Colt, widely considered in the world of forensics as a pioneer.

She had to do something for her sister. She was not there when Nichole placed the call that night. It was always drama with Nichole. Livia could only imagine finding redemption in some form and be able to help her sister in the future.

A body comes in which is thought to be a suicide. Turns out the guy, Casey had dated her sister Nichole. However, was it suicide or murder? Her sister was wild, and out of control before she was taken. What had she gotten herself into with someone like this?

Livia thought something was off about Megan’s book and her account of her abduction. However, the book was the closest thing she had gotten about the real details of the night Megan and Nichole were taken.

However, were they actually taken at the same time? What really happened and how are these two connected? What about other girls that were taken. Are they connected? A similar drug was used. We learn about the events leading up to the abduction. (did not find this very interesting).

Livia was ten years older than Nichole. Still, Livia knew most of Nichole’s friends from that time. Jessica Tanner had been one of her sister’s closest friends. She receives a call about Casey. The guy they had pulled out of the bay. He was the guy Nichole was dating that summer before she disappeared.

From here the bulk of the book goes on and on about the sick immature games Nichole played and the Capture Club (pretty far out). Nichole was self-centered, narcissistic, jealous, and manipulated everyone, seeking attention from everyone, mostly guys. Rebellion. She was part of this cult-club, who enjoyed playing games obsessed with abductions. (So tired of hearing about this girl, was hoping she would never be found).

A dangerous dark game. Nichole was jealous of Megan. Games she played. However, her plan backfires. A cast of characters from boyfriends promiscuous behavior, drugs, sex, and more abductions. Casey was creepy as well as many others. A bag over the head. Where are these bodies going?

We hear about all gory details of the bodies coming into the examiner’s office and not so realistic attempts by Livia to investigate the whereabouts of her sister and other missing elements. She finally teams up with Megan leading them to the real horror of the night both girls were taken.

My take: This was a difficult review to write as for why I have delayed posting. I hate to be negative; however, being honest here with a much lower rating than the first book. I really enjoyed Summit Lake, Donlea’s debut; however, was not fully engaged on any level with The Girl Who Was Taken.

Not many likable characters here and the best part of the book starts about 80%. Fast action and suspense. Then after all the buildup for an entire book, the identity of the killer is revealed, and like nothing happens. It ends. This would have been an opportunity for an entire book here. Very similar to another book I just finished (another 3 star).

Livia and Megan learn the identity and (it was like, now OK, and let’s move on- what’s for dinner)? From both sides. No why or explanation? No flushing out. No emotion. I am not a fan of cutting off a book this abruptly. Would like to have more focus and time spent on the latter part and less on the teenage disturbing events. Will not go into more details, with spoilers. I would have liked to hear more from Megan, her childhood and parents. Would have been an intriguing story here.

However, Donlea does a good job with the forensics, even though most folks in her situation would not be allowed all the liberties, but again this is fiction. The author offers suspense and action with a number of red herrings.

Sure the book will attract a variety of readers on a more positive note since it was outside- the-box. Would like to have a much more interesting city in NC for the setting, which was not expanded upon here. Really enjoy this author, so hoping for something different next go around.

I think my overall reading interests are changing to less dark thrillers, and enjoying more: domestic suspense, literary and historical fiction. Finding the more I read my book interests (genre) change.

A special thank you to Kensington and NetGalley for an early reading copy.

JDCMustReadBooks

Source: www.judithdcollinsconsulting.com/single-post/2016/09/06/The-Girl-Who-Was-Taken
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review 2017-04-27 03:41
Hexed by Kevin Hearne
Hexed - Kevin Hearne

Series: Iron Druid Chronicles #2

 

This was another fun installment in this series. It’s light reading, just a fun urban fantasy adventure series with a two thousand year old druid as a main character who tries to blend in by talking like a college student. In this one, Atticus faces an evil German witch coven he’s encountered before. I don’t have much else to say about it, so I’ll just throw in some links to my updates (I liked quite a few of the passages):

24%

71%

89%

 

I read this for square #16 “Read a book set in Illinois, Missouri, Kansas, Oklahoma, Texas, New Mexico, Arizona or California” for the booklikes-opoly game since it takes place in Arizona. The paperback is 320 pages so that’s another $3 for my bank, bringing my total to $43. And I get to roll tomorrow!

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review 2017-04-27 01:12
Love, love, love!
Daredevil (2015-) #19 - Charles Soule,Marc Laming,Dan Panosian

Sorry guys, I got into this review, and realized I had a lot to say about the comic book industry, characters, and how people perceive people who want more diversity.   It all does tie into Matt Murdock/Daredevil eventually.

 

I was looking up Marvel's latest sales and recently fell into the hell hole of Brietbart when I clicked on a link, not realizing it led there.   I read some of the comments and felt a bit ill, but the guest is: they believe that anyone who wants diversity and progressive storylines also hates the thought of white men as superheroes - um, not true - or anything that's conservative.   (Matt Murdock, who also goes by the name Daredevil, the Man Without Fear, is Catholic.   The reason I bring this up is Christianity and traditional family values - which often correlate to religious values - seem to be under attack.)   I've been thinking about this, as well as some breakdowns of who buys what.   (Messier than it seems: female led titles, and people of color as leads do lead to a more diverse audience, but they can also appeal to white liberals.   Furthermore, women don't only buy female led titles.   As a teen, I picked up comics that were mostly mixed teams - with, yes, quite a few women - or that had male leads, like Wolverine, whose titles I slavishly bought and followed.)

 

I do enjoy diversity, particularly when written by diverse creators, as I feel it gives me a point of view that I haven't read.   But I enjoy a lot of white male superheroes; have since I got dragged into a comic store as a girlfriend of a boy who loved comics.  I saw zero appeal at the time, until I stumbled upon both X-Men and Wolverine.   Wolverine was my first comic book love, and you don't forget that; I still have soft spot in my heart for him, although I'm not quite as fond of Old Man Logan in general.   Daredevil was the superhero I ended up connecting with the most; I own a bust of him, and of no other superhero.   (I thought I was going blind when I was in the teens, and was so serious about this I learned braille.   Daredevil, as a blind superhero - despite his abilities pretty much erasing his disability - not only appealed to me, but in a lot of ways gave me comfort and helped me overcome my fear.)   At that point, I needed that: white, black, blue, or yellow, man, woman, trans, gay, straight, Jewish, Christian, whatever.  I didn't care.  I just wanted that blind superhero, I needed it desperately.  

 

I don't even want Matt Murdock changed or replaced.   While I enjoy the new Wolverine, Laura Kinney doesn't have the same nostalgia, didn't make the same connection with me, as Logan did.   I like my white, male superheroes.   But I like a lot of the women superheroes, the black superheroes, the Muslim and Jewish superheroes.   (I am Jewish, just full disclosure here.)   Matt Murdock is slightly more conservative than other superheroes because of his Catholic upbringing - but he's not imposing that on anyone.   It doesn't become preachy.   And while I understand that many other series, as well as Daredevil, have become too liberal for some readers, they only have to stop reading.  Should Marvel go to a heavy conservative, much less alt-right, position, no doubt they'll have liberals dropping titles.   They have instead made the choice to keep politics out of their titles.   Probably a smart move: I enjoyed comics before they became politicized as they have now, and I liked them after - mostly because they were mouthpieces for how I felt.   (A lot of comic writers are liberals.   I suspect the comics will lean that way, even if they aren't as politicized.  I do wonder what will happen to The Champions, which was a heavily liberal mouthpiece - and which I loved for making all the statements I loved.   Slightly worried, but I will simply stop reading if it gets too weird for me, say so, and then move on unless I'm asked about it in the future.  Or I suspect this will happen.)

 

And what's weird is now I feel like I have to defend myself: no, no, I can have a vagina and like male superheroes!  Or maybe explaining why I can be white, and liberal, and still like white heroes.   And the thing is: if superheroes weren't interesting, I wouldn't read them.  I stopped reading the black, female Iron Man because I had too little time and energy to keep up with yet another title, and because I was already more invested in heroes like Daredevil, Moon Girl, Blue Beetle, and the like.  (Same  with Infamous Ironman, which starred another white boy, but I found myself more interested in because of the villain-to-hero aspect, and why that happened and how it happened.)   But, yes, the point is: I can like what I like.   I'm a little unsettled by everyone trying to unpack what I like and bottling it up by race or liberal or not.   That's not how it works all the time.  I liked Logan because he had to struggle to keep cool, because he had interesting journey, and I liked DD because the blindness resonated with my own fears.  I like Moon Girl because she hangs out with a huge red dinosaur - at least at first.   Now I love her for being smarter than so many of her peers and struggling with that, because I did, too.   I like superheroes for various reasons.  Or I have holes that I fill with literature: emotional, mental, or just holes in my knowledge.   I use different titles to fill those and I can't always tell what will strike my fancy.  

 

This storyline - which has been going on for a couple issues - is a confessional - quite literally.   Daredevil is finally revealing how the Purple Man - or his children or both - managed to get the whole world to forget he's Daredevil.   Not only that, every time I think I have a bead on what's happening, it changes.   I'm loving being continually surprised, without feeling like anything that happens is nonsensical.   Most of this takes place in Matt Murdock's mind while Zeb Kilgrave tries to manipulate him into doing the worst thing he can think of.   It's quite telling.   

 

But the ending.  Ah, the ending is the real kicker. 

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