logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: reincarnation
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2016-11-26 02:18
Kobato (manga, vol. 6) by CLAMP, translated by William Flanagan
Kobato, Vol. 06 - CLAMP

Kobato meets with Okiura without telling anyone, but Fujimoto finds her anyway and overhears her telling Okiura that she believes Fujimoto hates her. That isn't true, of course, but that doesn't stop Kobato from

fulfilling Sayaka's wish, to be free of Okiura's father, in the belief that Fujimoto would be happiest if Sayaka were happy. Fulfilling the wish leads to Kobato's death, but that's okay, because she gets reincarnated. Her new incarnation remembers Fujimoto and all the people in her past life, so she heads to them, even knowing that they probably won't remember her. What she doesn't realize is that Ginsei made a wish for Fujimoto to remember her, and so the two love birds are reunited (never mind that Kobato is 16 or so and Fujimoto is maybe in his late 30s). Suishou, the angel who helped Kobato live a little longer, is still within her until at least her next life, but after that the angel will be reunited with Iorogi.

(spoiler show)


While requesting manga volumes prior to my vacation, I remembered that I was only one volume away from finishing this series. I figured I should take care of that, but I made a mistake – I should have requested volume 5, and maybe volume 4 too, to remind me of what had happened and who everyone was. I last read those volumes way back in 2014, so I had gotten out of the flow of the series' emotional content, although my volume summaries at least helped me remember some of what was going on.

So, this was more than a bit confusing to get back to. I had forgotten how many crossover characters it had, for one thing. Only 20 pages in, and I'd spotted Chitose, Chi, and her sister (not as the actual characters from Chobits, of course, but rather alternate universe versions of themselves), as well as Kohaku from Wish. It should be noted that Kohaku really is the angel from Wish, and that Kobato is apparently set in the same universe as that series, just a few decades or so later. If I had taken the time to think about the implications of that, the ending might have been less of a surprise.

I still don't know that I'd have seen the ending coming, though, because it was just so much. Like, every happy ending CLAMP could possibly cram in there, whether or not it really fit. If I remember correctly, the original setup for this series indicated that someone would have to make a sacrifice – either Suishou would need to fade away in order for Kobato to live out her life with Fujimoto, or Kobato would need to die for Suishou to be free to go back to Iorogi and for Iorogi to get his original form back. Instead, literally everybody got to be with the person they loved. I like happy endings, I do, but I also want them to feel like they were earned, and this just seemed to fall into everyone's laps. Even though

reincarnation is part of this world's rules

(spoiler show)

, it still felt kind of like CLAMP had cheated.

I wonder how I'd feel about this series if I hadn't already read Wish? To my mind, this seemed like a cardboard cutout version of that series, with some of the same issues and themes but less tightly focused and with a little less charm. Then again, it's been a while since I've read Wish, and maybe my memories of it are rosier than it deserves. I'll have to add it to my “reread sometime soon-ish” list.

 

(Original review posted on A Library Girl's Familiar Diversions.)

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2016-09-30 22:42
Love that transcends time itself
The Gargoyle - Andrew Davidson

I know that there's a popular saying that you "shouldn't judge a book by its cover" but we all know that's a load of hooey because if we didn't care about covers then a large portion of the publishing industry would be out of a job. That being said, I totally picked up today's book because of its cover. In fact, it was the UK edition specifically that I coveted and so I ordered a used copy from overseas. It took me a few months to get to it but I truly wasn't expecting what it delivered. The book in question is The Gargoyle by Andrew Davidson. (It's his debut novel.) If you can make it through the first quarter of the book without your jaw dropping or gasping out loud then you're doing well. Warning: If you're squeamish in any way then I must caution you that this book discusses injuries of a severe nature in explicit (and excruciating) detail. It starts with a bang (actually a crash) and the action crests and dips from there. It's the story of a man who finds love in a most unusual way. The story flips between present day and various other times in history (medieval for instance). Honestly, I haven't made up my mind whether or not I really liked this book. I certainly found myself gripped when I was reading it but I always hesitated before picking it back up again. I think a large part of that is the dearth of details which I mentioned before. It felt a bit like overkill much of the time. Also, I didn't feel much of a connection to the characters (except perhaps the psychiatrist at the hospital whose last name I couldn't even begin to pronounce). It's an intricately woven tale and extremely ambitious for a debut novel. Davidson clearly knows his history and I tend to think he must be a hopeless romantic. I'd say this was a 6.5/10 for me. 

 

It's slightly hard to tell from this photo but the edges of the pages are black and the cover gives the appearance of being singed. Foreshadowing, anyone?

 

Source: inky-pages.blogspot.com

Source: readingfortheheckofit.blogspot.com
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2016-08-22 22:02
The Vengeful Half
The Vengeful Half (The Atlantis Families Book 1) - Jaclyn Dolamore

(I got a copy through NetGalley, in exchange for an honest review.)

This is one of those overdue reviews, since I've had this book on my tablet for quite a while. I remember requesting it partly because of its cover (the paperback one -- by comparison, the Kindle cover on Amazon is pretty bland), which seemed quite ominous to me. What can I say, I'm weak when faced with a certain type of cover.

The plot was intriguing, for sure. A hidden world full of family secrets, alliances to be had, strange magic (the doll people and the potions), ancient feuds, revelations aplenty, and a hidden enemy who's been bidding her time and is now bent on getting what she wants: possibly revenge... or something else? There's almost too much going on at times. At first I thought it would be more a quest-like story, with Olivia going after her mother and braving danger to save her. It didn't turn out like that, but that was alright, the kind of plot and intrigue it led to was pretty fine with me as well.

The characters: we have that girl, Olivia, who knows she's from another world/civilisation, without having been brought up in it, which leaves room for showing this land to the reader, without necessarily having to explain *all* of it, since Olivia already knows part of it and we can dispense with. We have Alfred, rich heir and future boss to a crime family, who's blind almost since birth and goes his way without whining about this—he's used to it, he has trouble with some things but has found ways to cope. Alfred also has to constantly remind other people that he can do, not everything but a lot of things: a conundrum close, I think, to quite a few double standards going around disabled people (pitied and treated like children almost, or blamed for "not making enough efforts" by many, instead of being considered as human beings first and foremost...). There's also Thessia, Alfred's fiancée, who could have been a nasty bitch and/or a jealous whiner, especially since she fits the too-beautiful-to-be-true girl, and turns out to be an idealist, an activist, and, well, a fairly decent person to be around, even though she has her downside (Atlantean rich society seems to be hell-bent on having its girls marry rich heirs, and gods forbid they want to have a career of their own...).

So, all in all, a lot of interesting things here. Unfortunately, a lot more annoyed me, causing me not to enjoy this story in the end.

From the start, something kept nagging at me, and it took me a while to put my finger on it. At some point, the author mentioned when the story originated (more about that later), back when she was still a child or teenager; I think this was what I "felt" about it, for having gone myself through the same conundrum of taking a story I first created when I was 12 or so, and trying to trim it and make it something worth reading. This was something I found extremely hard to do, because what we perceive as wonderful plot twists and concepts when we're younger aren't necessarily good things to leave as is... yet "upgrading" them is easier said than done. And so, I had that strange feeling that I was reading something I might have written when I was younger, and my reaction to it was a little similar. It's hard to explain. I could sum it up with "this feels like a very early work, and it needs more editing."

Another thing that bothered me, when it comes to this theme of parallel/hidden worlds, is how close to ours the latter was, when a parallel world could pave the way to so many other things. Let me develop a bit more by giving a personal example: I grew up in France, with a lot of dubbed TV shows originating from the USA, and at the time I had that fascination for the USA. If I wrote a story, I set it in some imaginary US town. Not my home country, no, it wasn't "good enough": it had to be like the USA, feel like the USA, whatever. Obviously it didn't occur to me at the time that Stephen King, for instance, set his stories in his country because that's what he knew, and that I was under the impression everything was better there only because I hadn't been exposed to shows from other countries. (Bear with me, I was 12-something.) And somehow, the way Atlantis people lived reminded me of this: their world felt like it hadn't been so much evolving as trying to mimic Earth's, and more specifically, well, you guess it. "Everything's better if it looks like our world." Kind of like being promised a walk in quaint little streets with exotic market stalls, and finding yourself in a mall instead—Atlanteans driving Ferraris didn't exactly impress me. I'd stand with Olivia on that one, who was expecting a high fantasy world at first and found a place with chocolate and soda cans instead.

(To be fair, though, all this might still hold more appeal to a teenage audience than it did to me: I also remember thinking "those are plot devices/themes I would've used myself, since I loved them, when I was in my teens." I had that thing going for telepathy and psychic powers in general, and parallel worlds, and "aliens/people with powers coming from those worlds to live hidden on Earth". I seriously doubt I was the only one.)

Third annoying bit: the somewhat sexist, somewhat dismissive way a few characters tended to act. Alfred disappointed me towards the end when it came to Thessia (pretty assholish move to make if you ask me, and then she's left to go away with the equivalent of "kthxbye see ya later, ah women, they always need some time to calm down huh"). Or what I mentioned above regarding heiresses only good enough to marry—any female character with a position/job of her own seemed to be either a villain or a reject/castaway/fugitive, as if no "proper woman" could hold her own. Although was pointed as backwards thinking, I felt a dichotomy, a certain hypocrisy in how it was mentioned, yet the people mentioning it still kept buying into the patriarchal model nonetheless.

Fourth: so many tropes. So, so many. You've got it all: pretty boy with a beautiful fiancée against which the main character feels so plain (but still becomes a love interest fairly quickly); people who were supposed to be dead but aren't; telepathy/psychic powers being used and thrown in in vague descriptions, solving things a little too easily at times; mandatory love triangle; elite school in which talking to The Wrong Person will turn you into a black sheep, instantly, just add water. It felt like a soap opera at times, and since I'm not particularly keen on those, it didn't help.

On the fence: the drawings, comic strips and short inserts. I didn't care about the style, but I can certainly understand the appeal, and who would fault an author for including those and being enthusiastic about it? Not me! However, I think they disrupted the flow of the story in some cases, either by revealing too much about the characters at that specific point or by just being there in the middle (did we really need pictures of the various soda brands?). More annoying though were the written inserts: in between two chapters, we get a bit (twice!) about how the story was born. Not uninteresting, yet... this could and should be put at the end, otherwise it's either disruptive or meant to be skipped, which would defeat the whole point.

Conclusion: could've been for me, but... nope, sorry.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2016-06-11 19:59
Still Cleaning Up
Krampus: Shadow of Saint Nicholas - Michael Dougherty
Junction True - Ray Fawkes,Vince Locke
New Construction: Two More Stories - Sam Alden
Sleepy Hollow Vol. 1 - Marguerite Bennett,Jorge Coehlo
The Honor Student at Magic High School, Vol. 1 - Tsutomu Satou
Mushoku Tensei: Jobless Reincarnation Vo... Mushoku Tensei: Jobless Reincarnation Vol. 1 - Rifujin na Magonote,Yuka Fujikawa

Krampus 

A bizarre Christmas horror story, following a somewhat Scrooge-like story line.  Did you ever play the game Bully?  Remember the drunk Santa Jimmy helped out?  The main character is that guy, only a little younger.  

 

A group of flawed characters, drunken santa, a dysfunctional cop, the local rich scrooge, and a hit and run driver all try to escape Krampus and his legions as they all reap what they've sown.

 

It's amusing, but the plot was a bit lacking and the ending left a lot to be desired.  The group of scrappy kids were probably the best part of this story.

 

Junction True

 

This one was beyond strange.  It's a story of blind trust, betrayal and revenge.  In the future fashion has taken on an (even more) dangerous fad, parasitical body modifications.  Skeletal pseudo punks (Neumods) pose braced against the concrete with tape worms visible under their stretched skin or genetically engineered leeches glowing with Rave colors across their bodies.

 

On the edge of this scene is the newest and most dangerous mod, a modification that would link two people together, one completely dependent on the other to live, two become one.

 

Dirk, our main character, is completely in love with Teralyn, a leader in the Neumod movement, always on the edge of cool and quick to abandon old trends and lovers.  But, Dirk trusts her and after a dangerous and illegal surgery puts his life in her hands.

 

It doesn't take long for Teralyn to bore of taking care of Dirk and her abandonment means death for him, he can't survive without linking to her.  Luckily he has friends and on deaths door he reunites once more with Teralyn for one more surgery.

 

It's a creepy story about lust, love, betrayal and the cut-throat nature of society, where some are given license to take advantage just based on status and celebrity and not punished for their irresponsible actions.

 

New Construction

 

Sam Alden is another artist whose work I follow.  I really enjoyed the two stories collected in this book, Household and Backyard.  One is about two siblings sharing their memories of their father, and dealing with their mixed up feelings.  Household was my favorite of the two and is about a commune where one of the kids totally disassociates and begins living in the yard as a dog. 

 

Both comics have a subdued quality that I find so true to life.  Things that seem bizarre to others, like why we do certain things, or have different relationships with our families/friends than what the majority would consider 'normal' isn't bizarre to the people living it, it's just life.

 

Two perfect slice of life comics that engrossed me in their worlds.

 

Sleepy Hollow

 

Perhaps you have to like the television series to enjoy this, but I found it pretty boring.  This adaptation of Ichabod Crane is perhaps the most ridiculous I've ever seen.  It's like Angel (the Buffy the Vampire Slayer/Detective spinoff), it jumped the shark before it ever aired.  

 

Basically, items across Sleepy Hollow, New York, cause people to go nutso, imbued with demonic entities trying to bring about the apocalypse.  Ichabod Crane who somehow pulled a Rip Van Winkle and woke up in the present day, teams with local detective to solve these diabolical crimes.

 

The artwork is good, but not unique.  If you like supernatural goings on with a bit of a procedural bent, try this out.

 

The Honor Student at Magic High School

 

Creepy, creepy, creepy.  The story revolves around a bishoujo girl and her sweet crush on her...brother!?  Yes, a sweet love story about a (thankfully) unrequited incestuous crush. 

 

As I look at other reviews of this book I'm baffled by the fact that reviewers don't seem to mention this bizarre aspect of the novel, or just say it's 'cute.'  It would be cute if she wasn't quite so enamored and it was more like an brother as a hero type story, but it seems she's sincere in her beyond familial affections for him...and it's just creepy as hell.

 

Truthfully I was so weirded out by the romance aspect of this story that I couldn't tell you what the plot was about.  The main character is in class 1, with a higher magical ability than her ugh beloved bro, who is barely able to magic anything and therefore gets bullied.

 

Too weird for me.

 

Mushoku Tensei: Jobless Reincarnation Vol. 1

 

 

Okay, moving on.  Here is a manga about a hikkikomori otaku who gets kicked out of his house when his parents die.  Then he gets hit by a truck.  Then he is resurrected in a fantasy world as an adorable little kid.  Actually, I think he was literally born and went through being a baby too, which thankfully is skipped over. Weird enough for you yet?

 

So, this pervy otaku is stuck in the body of a little boy, which in itself is creepy, yet also a little funny.

 

His parents are undecided about how they want him to grow up, will he be fighter like his dad, or a mage like his mom?  Because of his 34-year old otaku intelligence he is able to use magic from a young age, so his parents bring in a tutor (who of course is an adorable big chested tsundere (nice when alone, but gruff when around others)).  At first he gives into his perverted otaku tendencies, but soon decides to live a better life from then on.  

 

This volume follows his childhood adventures, fighting with bullies, making friends and convincing his mom to forgive his dad when the maid gets pregnant.  Yeah, normal stuff like that.  

 

This is really one of the most bizarre mangas I've read (which says a lot) and yet it kinda works too.  I'll probably check out another volume of this one.

29966699

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2016-05-08 00:24
I want to believe
The Forgetting Time - Sharon Guskin

When it comes to reincarnation, I’m like Mulder in “The X-Files” – I want to believe. What a wonderful concept to think that we have another life ahead of us with a second chance to live a better life. 

 

Noah is a 4-year-old boy who lives with his single mom, Janie. She has always thought that he was precocious as he seemed to know about things he was never taught.  But his terror of bathing is getting worse as is his longing for his “other mother” and his desire to go home, even when he’s in his own bed with Janie beside him.  When the school gets involved, Janie knows that something more must be done to help her child.

 

Jerome Anderson is a psychology professor who has been diagnosed with aphasia and is gradually losing words and his understanding of language. He longs to have enough time to finish his work researching children who have memories of previous lives.  Noah may be the child whose memories can help Jerry finish his work.

 

This is a book for everyone, no matter what your beliefs may be regarding any type of afterlife. It’s beautifully written and will touch your heart in so many ways.  But be prepared to have your mind opened, if it isn’t already, to the possibility of lives other than the one you’re living at the moment.  This fictional novel is very believable and contains quotes telling of actual case histories of children with memories of previous lives from the book “Life Before Life” by Dr. Jim Tucker.

 

This is Sharon Guskin’s first novel and it’s obvious that she’ll have quite a career ahead of her. This book has so many layers to it.  It’s a thought-provoking study about reincarnation.  It’s a suspenseful murder mystery.  It’s a story about the strong bond between a mother and child.  It’s the story of a man losing both written and spoken language and facing the end of his life.  It’s about the connections that humans have to each other.

 

Highly recommended.

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?