logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: retirement
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-07-09 13:22
Insidious and disquieting horror. Great evil characters, a very satisfying ending.
Doctor Perry - Kirsten McKenzie

I write this review as a member of Rosie’s Book Review Team and thank Rosie Amber (check here if you would like to have your book reviewed) and the author for providing me with an ARC copy of this novel, that I freely chose to review.

I read and reviewed Kirsten McKenzie’s book Painted a while back and thoroughly enjoyed the experience, so when I heard about her new novel, and after reading the description, I knew I should read it.

Although the topic is quite different, there are many similarities between this story and the author’s previous incursion into the horror genre. The setting is not quite as important as the old house was in Painted, but Rose Haven, the retirement home where much of the action takes place, plays a central role in the story. This home, which had previously been a motel, has not much to recommend it, other than being cheap. There are a few sympathetic members of staff, but mostly, from the director to the nursing and auxiliary staff, people are in it for what they can get, try to do as little as possible, and some are downright dangerous. Caring professionals they are not, that’s for sure. What comes across more than anything is how dehumanised and dehumanising a place it is, but there are also gothic elements to it, particularly the doctor’s lab, that seems to have come right out of Frankenstein or Doctor Jekyll and Mr Hyde. The novel also has a timeless feel, as there is talk about television and the news, but no mention of social media or modern technology, and the action is set in the recent past, or in a parallel time-frame, similar but not quite the same as our present. Even with the outdoors scenes and the many settings, the novel manages to create a sense of claustrophobia that makes readers feel uneasy as if they were also trapped and caught up in the conspiracy.

I found this novel much more plot-driven than the previous one. The cast of characters is much larger here (there is a list at the end, which is quite useful), and it is not always easy to keep them separate, as some of them don’t have major roles, and sometimes the only difference between them might be their degree of nastiness or their specific bad habits (drug use, thieving, violence…). Some characters we don’t know well enough to be able to make our minds up about, like the police officers or some of Dr Perry’s patients. There are not many truly sympathetic characters, and even those (like Elijah and Sulia) show a certain degree of moral ambiguity that makes the novel much more interesting and realistic in my opinion. The book is full of characters that show psychopathic tendencies, and its shining star is Doctor Perry. I’ll try not to reveal any spoilers, but from the cover of the book and the description, I think anybody reading the book will know who the main baddie is (as I said, he’s not alone, but he is in a league of his own). He is a fascinating character, and we learn more and more about him as we read, although there’s enough left to readers’ imagination to keep him alive in our minds for a long time. Oh, there are two other characters that are quite high up in the malevolent league, but I’ll let you discover them yourselves. (I love them!)

The author uses the same peculiar point of view she used in Painted to narrate the story. The novel is written in the third person, from the point of view of most of the characters, from the residents in the hospital to the receptionist, and of course, the doctor, while also having moments when we are told things from an outside observer’s perspective (it is not a third-person omniscient POV but it is not a third-person limited point of view either, but a combination of the two), and that increases the intrigue and adds to the novel rhythm and pacing. There is head-hopping, as a chapter can be experienced through several different characters, and I recommend paying attention to all the details, although the main characters are very distinct and their points of view easy to tell apart. The mystery, in this case, is not who the guilty party is (that is evident from the beginning) but what exactly is happening and who the next victim will be. And also, how it will all end. In case you’re wondering, and although I won’t give you any specifics, I enjoyed the ending.

There are great descriptions of places, characters’ thoughts, and their sensations (including those due to chronic illness, which are portrayed in a realistic and accurate way), and also of some of the ‘supernatural’ (I can’t be more precise not to ruin the surprise) processes that take place. There is more gore in this novel than in the previous one, and although it is not extreme, I would not recommend it to people who are hypersensitive and have a vivid imagination unless they like horror. If you can easily “feel the pain” of the characters, this could be torture.

Another fascinating novel by Kirsten McKenzie, and one that will make readers think beyond the plot to related subjects (elderly abuse, unethical behaviours by caring professionals…). Great evil characters and a very satisfying ending. I recommend it to readers of horror who enjoy a gothic touch, and to those who prefer their horror ambiguous, insidious, and disquieting.

(Don’t miss the mention of a real orphanage in Florida and the link to donate to their important cause).

Like Reblog Comment
review 2017-04-23 05:56
Not your average grandparents!
The Little Old Lady Who Broke All the Rules: A Novel - Catharina Ingelman-Sundberg

A delightful and funny read!!

Martha and her group of friends had decided that they were all going to live in the same retirement home. For the first few years, things were good. But when management changed, they find their luxury living is coming to an end. Nurse Barbara is a constant thorn in their sides. They are bored and looking for excitement.
That is when Martha gets the bright idea to commit a crime so that they can go to prison, where they would get better food and have a bit more freedom. But when they commit their crime, and go to the police to confess, they are initially brushed off as crazy. But they lay out how they have committed the crime, the police have no choice but to charge them and bring them to trial. As they spend their time in prison, they find it is not all what it was cracked up to be. But they spend their time working on planning new crimes, trying to figure out what happened to part of their ransom money, and wanting to get away with the next one.
Brains and Martha find a way to send messages back and forth through a clergyman who has been visiting them.
What transpires is a tale of hilarity, with the League of Pensioners center stage working to get a better life, and find a way to help other senior citizens who are in the same boat that they are.

This book was such a delight to read. It was funny and engaging. The characters were well fleshed out, and one can almost imagine Martha being their grandmother! This is a book that everyone needs to read and pass on to someone else to enjoy!

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2016-06-16 08:27
Retirement is Murder by Alex England
Retirement is Murder - Alex England

Retirement is Murder by Alex England is a mystery. I gave it four stars. The dialogue is snappy, even when the protagonist is talking only to himself. I needed to consult a dictionary for many of the Yiddish expressions used.

 

Rushmore Oshansky wants to retire to Palm Springs. His wife, Marsha is dead set against it. After he caught her cheating they divorced. Then he moved to Palm Springs. While it was a great place, the 117 degree temperature caught him off guard.

He got lucky finding a great condo & signed a two year lease. The real estate agent told him that many of the women living in the Villa were hot. "Hot to trot plus that mountain view, Oshansky mused, just might make up for any lack of kosher corned beef."

 

He went to the Men's Political Discussion Group & they asked him to tell them about himself: "'Jewish, divorced, & retired.' Oshansky had just summed up his life in three words. He wondered if most people's lives can be described in less words than the average grocery list."

 

He wanted to enjoy his prime rib in peace when a red haired Brenda Glickman, a former elementary school principal, seated herself at his table & started talking. She finished his scotch without warning. She went on to describe condo living. "The men only care about their stock portfolios. And sex. To be more explicit, whether their stocks are up or down & whether their privates are up or down. As for the women, they care only about snaring one of the men, hoping everything is on the up--privates & portfolios."

 

I received a complimentary copy from Amazon. That did not change my opinion for this review.

 

Link to purchase: https://www.amazon.com/Retirement-Murder-Alex-England-ebook/dp/B019S3IVGO

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?