logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: ripley-read
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-08-22 07:26
Brilliant mind spook
The Talented Mr. Ripley - Patricia Highsmith

This is an unsettling book.

Ripley is a non-entity, whiny, unimpressive. A nobody, as Marge very insightfully observes in a letter. Which makes him eerie, and by all rights not a character we should wish to root for. Yet from the middle on, I found myself anxious over the instability of his position. That's some writing for you.

The other way the book is brilliant is the subtle, but steadily rising, feeling that Tom is... not right. Even from page one there is this undefinable wrongness. Then there is some point around a third in where all the exclamation progress-posts start, and I totally got it when I reached it. That's one scary, sick puppy.

Think about it: he's a fast stepper, but he's no genius, and he likes to take chances; but he's a cool cucumber, and can mimic to convince even himself. No one realizes. Translate it to the real world now.

It is the horror of the uncanny valley, made all the scarier because we understated the only reason we know it is that we are reading from the inside of his head. Cheery though for before bed, huh?

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2017-08-22 06:57
Reading progress update: I've read 240 out of 249 pages.
The Talented Mr. Ripley - Patricia Highsmith

"In a way it was asking for trouble, Tom thought."

 

Ya think?

 

"The very chanciness of trying for all of Dickie's money, the peril of it, was irresistible to him. He was so bored after the dreary, eventless weeks in Venice,"

 

That's character consistence for you.

 

 

And then BOOM! More excitement than you bargained for

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2017-08-22 00:28
Reading progress update: I've read 150 out of 249 pages.
The Talented Mr. Ripley - Patricia Highsmith

When it rains, it pours.

 

Now this is amazing: I have NO sympathy for Ripley, the whinny psycho, yet reading all crumble under him makes me anxious as hell.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2017-08-20 22:02
Reading progress update: I've read 110 out of 249 pages.
The Talented Mr. Ripley - Patricia Highsmith

It was a good idea to practice jumping into his own character again, because the time might come when he would need to in a matter of seconds, and it was strangely easy to forget the exact timbre of Tom Ripley's voice.

 

He truly does not have an identity. I think this is the scariest thing. He's not a whole person, but a husk of clay.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-08-20 20:14
The Talented Mr. Ripley
The Talented Mr. Ripley - Patricia Highsmith

Rereading The Talented Mr. Ripley has been so much fun and it´s a book that actually improves during the second read. Knowing the basic outline of the story makes this a more satisfying read, because you can focus on all the fine nuances the story has to offer.

 

Tom Ripley is a delightfully creepy and amoral character (he himself not being aware of it) and following his sociopathic behaviour is a blast. From his point of view there is a kind of logic to his behaviour, everything he does makes sense to him and I couldn´t help but to be appalled and fascinated at the same time by his character. Since Highsmith tells the story from Tom´s perspective, I began simultaeously to root for him as soon as his lifestyle was threatened by outside forces and to keep my fingers crossed that he may get caught.  

 

There is nothing more I could add to my initial review, which I wrote two years ago when I first read the book. One thing has changed, though. I still have a strong sense of justice, but now I think the ending of the novel is perfect.

 

I felt a wicked delight everytime Tom experienced a bout of paranoia, that nagging feeling that he may get caught at all times. I hope he may live for all eternity in this state of unrest.

(spoiler show)
More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?