logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: space-and-time
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2019-12-10 21:36
A solid if unremarkable pair of adventures
The Man Who Mastered Time / Overlords From Space - Joseph Kelleam,Ray Cummings

The more Ace Doubles I read, the more I come to appreciate how varied the experience of reading them can be. For all of their similarity of their size, their plot-driven approach, and their cover art (which typically consists of square-jawed white dudes inflicting violence on aliens or some other evildoers, often with a woman somewhere in the scene recoiling in terror), the quality and nature of the books can vary widely.

 

This pair provided the best reflection yet of these differences. Ray Cummings's The Man Who Mastered Time was unusual in that it was not an original work but a reprint of a 1920s story which reads like a riff on H.G. Wells's famous novelette The Time Machine. In it, a father-and-son duo of scientists stumble across a process that allows them to peer into the indeterminate future. Witnessing a beautiful girl imperiled by a thuggish brute, the two turn a hoverable aeroplane into a time machine, which the hormonally-driven son uses to travel thousands of years into the future to rescue the maiden. He soon finds himself in the midst of a political struggle between the people of an ice-age north and the remaining civilization, which has retreated to the Caribbean and reflects a class divide that ol' Herbert George would have found familiar (seriously, it wouldn't surprise me in the least to find that he sued for copyright infringement). The young man soon summons his father for aid, and with the help of a friend, aid the civilized underdogs against the barbarian hordes. There are some aspects of the novel – such as the employment of "girls" in combat – that but for the most part it's a prime piece of pulp science fiction, and while it had it's share of problematic elements (the scientist's friend zeroing in on the beautiful girl's teenage sister seemed a little predatory even for the time) I enjoyed it for the action adventure it was.

 

The other novel was Joseph Kelleam's Overlords from Space. Here there was a real contrast with Cummings's novel; whereas Cummings has heroic adventurers as his protagonist, Kelleam's novel centers around humans enslaved by the Zarles, an alien species who conquered the Earth two centuries before. Though their domination of the Earth seems absolute, the ostensibly immortal Zarles are slowly dying from terrestrial disease. Worse they cannot reproduce, and the remaining Zarles are contemplating destroying the Earth and moving on elsewhere. It's a different premise from the ones I expect from the time, though the plot itself moves to familiar beats involving freedom, the discovery of resources and allies that can even the odds, and a climactic battle in which the outcome isn't really in doubt. In this respect it's as much a product of its time as Cummings's older novel (which ends, I kid you not, with a Jazz Age party), though one that proved entertaining enough to see through to its end.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2019-12-10 03:40
Reading progress update: I've read 173 out of 320 pages.
The Man Who Mastered Time / Overlords From Space - Joseph Kelleam,Ray Cummings

From the point at which I last left off the novel developed into a fairly standard good-guys-versus-bad-guys match-up. The time machine's inventor and his friend join the inventor's son in the future to fight the bad guy. Is it really a spoiler to tell you that the good guys emerge triumphant? And in the end they all live happily ever after in the best Gatsby-era New York style, dressed in formal wear and sipping cocktails while listing to one of their number belt out a tune on a piano. So utterly devoid of suspense or imagination. I enjoyed every pulpy page of it.

 

Now it's on to Joseph Kelleam's Overlords from Space. I suspect I won't be quite the square-jawed adventure of Cummings's tale.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2019-12-09 12:46
Reading progress update: I've read 60 out of 320 pages.
The Man Who Mastered Time / Overlords From Space - Joseph Kelleam,Ray Cummings

For this Ace Double I decided to start with Ray Cummings's The Man Who Mastered Time, which was a reprinting of a book originally published in the 1920s. Cummings was a very prolific author, and though this is the first of his books of his that I've ever read I figured out how he was able to churn out dozens upon dozens of novels over his career, as so far it reads like a cribbing of H.G. Wells' The Time Machine. I'm at the point, though, where, having traveled to the far future and saved the pretty, childlike girl the time traveler (in the case, the inventor's son) communicates with the past to summon reinforcements to fight the bad guys, so we're about to diverge from Wells's story. I look forward to discovering from what source Cummings is borrowing from for the next part of his book,

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-11-11 17:28
2 Escudos: "NewTales of Space And Time" by Raymond J. Healy
New Tales of Space and Time - Ray Bradbury,Isaac Asimov,Anthony Boucher,A.E. van Vogt,Kris Neville,Reginald Bretnor,Cleve Cartmill,P. Schuyler Miller,Gerald Heard,Raymond J. Healy,Frank Fenton,Joseph Petracca

(Original Review, 1980-09-11)


I tend to think in too cynical channels, and some comments sort of swept me back to the days when I found a Pocketbook (that's the trademarked name, not the generic) called NEW TALES OF SPACE AND TIME on the racks in our local US Import bookshop, plunked down my 2 escudos, and got COMPLETELY blown away on SF.
 
 
If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review.
 
 

 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-06-13 13:43
Secret of the Time Tablets (Cleopatra in Space #3) - Mike Maihack
For more reviews, check out my blog: Craft-Cycle

Awesome continuation of the Cleopatra in Space series. This is the third book in the series and I highly recommend reading the first two before reading this one. A lot happens with this one in terms of the prophesy, time tablets, and overall story arch. There are many references to what happened in the previous books, but I think it's best to just read them. They are just as amazing as this one.

As with the first two, great artwork and funny dialogue. This one has a sort of Western/cowboy style to it. It is a fun adventure story sure to delight anyone who is a fan of space adventure, ancient prophecies, and kick-butt historical figures. I really love the characters.

This one is a bit darker than the other ones and death is much more common, but it is still a fascinating and exciting adventure. Loved it. Can't wait for the next book. 
More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?