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photo 2016-07-20 09:29

New York Times bestselling author Steve Silberman on THE EAGLE TREE

"The Eagle Tree is a gorgeously written novel that features one of the most accurate, finely drawn and memorable autistic protagonists in literature. The hero of the book is like a 14-year-old Walt Whitman with autism, seeking communion with the ancient magnificent beings that tower over the landscape around Olympia, Washington. Ned Hayes plays with the conventions of the unreliable narrator so that you end up feeling like March is a very reliable narrator of glorious and terrifying aspects of the world that neurotypicals can’t see. Credible, authentic, powerful. A must-read.”

– Steve Silberman, author of NeuroTribes: The Legacy of Autism and the Future of Neurodiversity, winner of the Samuel Johnson Prize for non-fiction.

Source: theeagletree.com
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text 2016-05-02 13:00
April Wrap-Up & May Reading List
A Ghost In The Machine - Caroline Graham
The Nine Tailors - Dorothy L. Sayers
Murder in Baker Street: New Tales of Sherlock Holmes - Jon Lellenberg,Martin H. Greenberg,Daniel Stashower
The Black Country - Alex Grecian
For Dead Men Only: An Alexandra Gladstone Mystery - Paula Paul
NeuroTribes: The Legacy of Autism and the Future of Neurodiversity - Steve Silberman
The World's Finest Mystery and Crime Stories: 4: Fourth Annual Collection - Ed Gorman
Infinite Jest - David Foster Wallace
Lord of Chaos - Robert Jordan
Wish You Well - David Baldacci

April Wrap-Up

 

I completed eight books in April. Here's the breakdown:

 

5 stars: 1

The Annotated Sherlock Holmes Volume II by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

4 stars: 0

 

3 stars: 5

Death of a Hollow Man by Caroline Graham

The Secret of High  Eldersham by Miles Burton

The Yard by Alex Grecian

The Color of Magic by Terry Pratchett

The Light Fantastic by Terry Pratchett

 

2 stars: 2

Death in Disguise by Caroline Graham

Veronica's Grave by Barbara Bracht Donsky

 

Reviews: 8

 

I participated in Dewey's 24 Hour Readathon this month and managed to read 2 1/2 books during the 24 hours. I also finally finished adding all my books to Leafmarks.

 

May Reading List

 

I'm treating May as my cleanup month. The books that I didn't get to in March and April are on my reading list this month.

 

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text 2016-04-28 12:11
Steve Silberman Endorsement – The Eagle Tree

 

“The Eagle Tree is a gorgeously written novel that features one of the most accurate, finely drawn and memorable autistic protagonists in literature. The hero of the book is like a 14-year-old Walt Whitman with autism, seeking communion with the ancient magnificent beings that tower over the landscape around Olympia, Washington. Ned Hayes plays with the conventions of the unreliable narrator so that you end up feeling like March is a very reliable narrator of glorious and terrifying aspects of the world that neurotypicals can’t see. Credible, authentic, powerful. A must-read.”

 

Steve Silberman, New York Times bestselling author of NeuroTribes: The Legacy of Autism and the Future of Neurodiversity, winner of the Samuel Johnson Prize for non-fiction.

Source: theeagletree.com
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text 2016-04-04 14:28
March Wrap-Up & April Reading List
Death In Disguise - Caroline Graham
A Ghost In The Machine - Caroline Graham
The Nine Tailors - Dorothy L. Sayers
Murder in Baker Street: New Tales of Sherlock Holmes - Jon Lellenberg,Martin H. Greenberg,Daniel Stashower
The Yard - Alex Grecian
The Black Country - Alex Grecian
The Secret of High Eldersham: A British Library Crime Classic (British Library Crime Classics) - Miles Burton
For Dead Men Only: An Alexandra Gladstone Mystery - Paula Paul
NeuroTribes: The Legacy of Autism and the Future of Neurodiversity - Steve Silberman
The World's Finest Mystery and Crime Stories: 4: Fourth Annual Collection - Ed Gorman

 

March Wrap-Up

 

March wasn’t as a great a month as I thought it would be -- too much overtime, too little sleep. I read nine books in March and here's the breakdown:

 

5 Stars: 1

Sherlock: Chronicles by Steve Tribe

 

4 Stars: 2

The Killings at Badger's Drift by Caroline Graham

Death in the Tunnel by Miles Burton

 

3 Stars: 4

Death of a Hollow Man by Caroline Graham

The Dragon Throne by Chrys Cymri

Relativity by James Swallow

Superman: Secret Identity by Kurt Busiek, Stuart Immonen

 

2 Stars: 1

The Force Awakens by Alan Dean Foster

 

1 Star: 1

The Apple Tart of Hope by Sarah Moore Fitzgerald - I'm still kind of angry about this one.

 

Reviews: 9

 

DNF: 1.5

Planet X - This is already in a pile ready to be donated or passed off to my nieces if they want it.

The Indomitable Ten - I plan on giving this book one more chance before writing it off. I might start on the short stories in the back and work my way forward.

 

I didn’t get to Lord of Chaos in The Wheel of Time series. I had planned on reading it toward the end of the month, but I made the mistake of picking up The Indomitable Ten first and it kind of killed my desire to read anything too intense or long, ditto for Infinite Jest. I did not complete the second volume of The Annotated Sherlock Holmes -- I have a little more than 200 pages left to go. I’ve also been slowly duplicating my library and reviews on Leafmarks based on the recommendations from both Murder by Death and Bookstooge’s Reviews on Board. Thanks guys!

 

 

April Reading List

 

My reading list for April isn’t too set in stone. I'm in the mood for Mystery right now, so most of my TBR is made up of that genre. Of course based on previous experiences, I'll plow through 5 or 6 books and then decide I need some Fantasy or Sci-Fi. Dewey’s 24 Hour Readathon is April 23rd (two days before my birthday) and I have a tentative list, but that might change once again, depending on whether or not I burn out on Mystery earlier in the month.

 

 

 

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photo 2016-02-22 13:55

Early review of new novel THE EAGLE TREE (May 2016) from Steve Silberman, author of NEUROTRIBES -- on FiveBooks.com

 

"Creating credible autistic protagonists is tricky for neurotypical writers. It took me about a year to drill down through the clinical clichés in my head and be able to portray people on the spectrum with as little unconscious stereotyping as possible. One of the Jedi mind-tricks of NeuroTribes is that the autistic person in any scene is almost always the emotional center of the scene, even if clinicians or parents are also in the room: a subversive reversal of the usual framing of autistic lives."

 

"But The Eagle Tree, a gorgeously written novel, features one of the most accurate, finely drawn and memorable autistic protagonists I’ve come across in literature: a boy named March whose passion is finding out everything he can about trees and then climbing them. Instead of portraying March in the usual clueless-Aspie way – as “obsessed” with trees and “perseverating” on them to the exasperation of everyone around him – the hero of the book is like a 14-year-old Walt Whitman with autism, seeking communion with the ancient magnificent beings that tower over the landscape around Olympia, Washington. Even when March is missing the import of the chatter of the adults who exert control over his life, Hayes plays with the conventions of the unreliable narrator so that you end up feeling like March is a very reliable narrator of glorious and terrifying aspects of the world that neurotypicals can’t see."

Source: theeagletree.com
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