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text 2016-09-30 16:22
Lyrically Justified - Urban Word Collective,Shaun Clarke For me, 'Lyrically Justified' encapsulates a new and exciting movement in poetry. This collection of poems, lyrics and urban rhyme grants literary space to marginalised perspectives and voices, exploring raw themes that traditional poetry sometimes cannot do justice. With lines such as 'Great Britain, What's great about a country that is broke' (page 140), the stark reality of these poems force the reader to actually face the problems addressed within the UK and beyond. In that sense, beyond everything 'Lyrically Justified' is extremely eye-opening. Many topics are covered, from addiction to migration, from consumerism to war. However, despite the disparity of subjects, the collection feels distinctly inclusive. Each piece is written in a completely different style to the next, yet when reading them as a whole a collective sense of anger and frustration is conveyed, in which this new wave of poetry is perfect in capturing. Although the collection is free from swearing, the colloquial use of urban slang, repetition and references to modern entities provides the collection with a certain rawness. Paired with poetical prowess, these young artists, poets, singers and writers prove that they are 'lyrically justified when (they) stand up and say what's right'.
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text 2016-08-24 14:55
Reading progress update: I've read 6 out of 128 pages.
DMZ, Vol. 10: Collective Punishment - Andrea Mutti,Cliff Chiang,Nathan Fox,David Lapham,Brian Wood,Danijel Žeželj

unfortunately, I don't get any Riccardo Burchielli artwork this time around, which is a downer--but Danijel Zezelj is on board for some of the pencilling, and for me that's a big upper!

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review 2016-05-04 07:05
Sensation by Nick Mamatas
Sensation (Spectacular Fiction) - Nick Mamatas

It all starts with a wasps' nest in Raymond's mother's basement. The wasps are Hymenoepimescis sp., which usually reproduces by attacking the Plesiometa argyra spider and laying its eggs within the spider's abdomen. As the larvae feed off the spider, they change its behavior, compelling it to create a web that can allow them to finish their development. When the spider is done with its work, the larvae kill it. (The spider and wasp species are real – nature is freaky and horrifying.)

Hymenoepimescis sp. doesn't usually build a nest or use humans as its hosts, but in this case it was affected by the unusually high radon levels in Raymond's mother's basement. Julia, Raymond's wife, is attacked by one of these wasps and unknowingly has its eggs injected into her. Over the course of the next few months, the larvae gradually affect her behavior in various ways, until one day she decides to leave Raymond. From that point on, she proceeds to become famous, carrying out an assassination and inspiring a nameless political movement which has no apparent goal. What neither she nor Raymond realizes is that they are both pawns in an ancient war between Hymenoepimescis sp. and Plesiometa argyra.

I'm not sure how I feel about this book. Part of the problem was that “war” was maybe too strong of a word for what was going on between the spiders and the wasps. Although the spiders were an intelligent collective and were, in fact, the book's narrator, the wasps were just doing their thing. When their hosts were spiders, “their thing” meant inspiring behaviors that would allow their larvae to survive and become adult wasps. They weren't intelligent and hadn't evolved to grow inside and control human hosts, so their effect on humans was more aimless and chaotic. The end result left me wondering what the point was supposed to be, and the story became more tedious than interesting.

I did enjoy the bulk of this book, though. I was drawn in by Julia's erratic behavior. I wanted to know what she'd do next and what sorts of actions she'd inspire (although she was the only one being directly affected by the wasps, she seemed to inspire changes in everyone around her, apparently without even meaning to). Raymond watched her antics on the news and desperately tried to make some sense of it all, unable to truly move on.

The main reason why I decided to read this book was because of the intelligent spiders. I liked that the story was told from their collective point of view, both as individual spiders trying to keep track of the movements of the various characters and as spider-controlled masses of webbing designed to look like “men of indeterminate ethnicity.” There were moments when I felt that the author occasionally slipped up, including details that Raymond would have known (about his own experiences and feelings, for example) that the spiders probably wouldn't have. Still, it was interesting, and I liked their very alien perspective on how they should behave and what sorts of things humans might feel comfortable with and enjoy. I wish there had been more of that.

The world-building didn't really work for me. I could deal with the way the wasps mutated to be able to inject their eggs into Julia (honestly, it wasn't much different than accepting that radiation could create superheroes), and the author did eventually (a bit later than I'd have liked) provide some of the history of the spiders' influence on humans. However, there were lots of things I wanted to know more about, and instead I got vagueness or absolutely nothing. I'm still wondering how a giant mass of spiders could create a believably human-looking being, especially since the spiders didn't always seem to be confident about their ability to successfully communicate like humans or create natural human facial expressions. And why weren't they more confident about their mimicry, considering how long they'd existed alongside humans?

I also had issues with the characters. Just about every female character in the book behaved, at one time or another, like she was Julia under the influence of wasps. It didn't seem like they were consistently themselves. And the thing was, I'd probably have been able to put up with that, and my issues with the world-building, if it had all amounted to something.

I really liked the premise and the unusual POV. I just wish the finale had been as good as the buildup.

Additional Comments:

I counted at least six typos or instances of missing words. That doesn't sound like a lot, but it was more than I expected in a work this short, and the errors were really noticeable.

 

(Original review posted on A Library Girl's Familiar Diversions.)

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text 2015-10-25 18:28
Cover Reveal for Hameln-13 and a Surprise Gift

My subscribers already saw the cover for my upcoming Collective SF story, Hameln-13, and yesterday at the Halloween party I had my official cover and synopsis reveal.

 

Just to give you some quick background info for those who don’t know, The Collective SF is a group of authors who write in a shared universe where slave-scribes toil tethered to a seemingly immortal entity known only as the God-Machine. Their duty is to record newly created histories and chronicle the past. Only something is horribly wrong. Instead of factual history, the God-Machine is mistaking fairy tales and lore for historical fact.

 

And this is where The Collective SF comes in. We take existing fairytales and legends and re-imagine them as historical fact. We give them science fiction settings and we inject the stories with a substantial dose of Embrosis.

 

My scribe, Wifelier Docht, is tasked with recording the legend of The Pied Piper of Hamelin, but in his augmented reality the legend is known as Hameln-13, named after the outpost planet where the events took place.

 

And here is the cover:

 

 

Xavier Granville designed the cover and I tell you, it’s an awesome thing when you plan a story and someone shows you the packaging that makes out part of your book. I love the cover because it embodies the tone I imagined for the planet Hameln-13.

 

As for the synopsis:

 

After their spacecraft tumbles from orbit, a small group of scientists, engineers, and soldiers is left stranded on a planet in a remote galaxy not yet fully mapped. With resources quickly dwindling and unable to communicate with Earth, they are forced to venture further out into the unknown alien landscape in search of alternative resources.

 

They should never have done that. Hameln-13 hides a terrible evil for underneath its surface the Murr patiently wait to feed. And they are hungry. They have not eaten in over a century.

 

Let’s call this a teaser for now. I’m still writing the story and I don’t want to spoil anything should the tale decide to go a different route. Suffice to say, I’m aiming for a Lovecraftian finish. Oh, and the “Pied Piper” in my story is a freaky alien called Decan Lude. There is some significance to my choosing this name. I bet you can’t figure it out.

 

The release date is officially scheduled for January 2016.

 

Lastly, I have one more surprise for you. If you subscribe to The Collective SF newsletter here, you’ll get access to our Starter Library–for free. The library consists of six books, including The Seals of Abgal. Yes, that is correct. You’ll get The Seals of Abgal free when you subscribe to the Collective SF’s site.

 

It’s not a bad deal at all. Damn, I’m giving all my books away and have nothing left to sell. I guess I should write more and faster.

 

Cheers!

 

Woelf

 

(Originally posted on woelfdietrich.com on 25/10/2015)

Source: woelfdietrich.com/2015/10/25/hameln-13-cover-reveal-and-a-surprise-gift
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text 2015-10-10 09:10
Halloween With The Collective SF

 

I’m busy with a novel called, Hameln-13, for The Collective SF that will come out either in December or January next year. This is another shared universe setup, but with a slight difference.

 

On The Collective SF’s blog, we have log entries from various “scribes” tethered to an entity known only as the God-Machine. Their duty is to record newly created histories and chronicle the past. Only something goes horribly wrong and instead of factual history, fairy tales and lore are mistaken for historical fact. 

 

Hameln-13 is my retelling of the Pied Piper of Hamelin legend, but in this version the setting is a remote alien planet in a star system not yet fully mapped.

 

Which brings me to the reason for today’s post: The Collective SF is hosting a pre-Halloween Halloween party. We’ll be revealing some awesome stuff, including covers for our forthcoming stories.

 

Join us!

 

Woelf

Source: www.facebook.com/events/1659831217637006
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