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Search tags: the-eye-of-the-world
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text 2019-01-20 02:13
Movie Review: Jurassic World

 

Title: Jurassic World
Release Date: 2015
Starring: Chris Pratt, Bryce Dallas Howard, Vincent D’Onofrio, Ty Simpkins
Length: 2h 4min
Rating: PG

 

Favourite character: Claire


Crush: Owen
Least favourite character: Hoskins

Favourite line: Monster is a relative term. To a canary, a cat is a monster. We’re just used to being the cat.

 

Mini-Review: This is one of my favourite Jurassic movies. Bryce Dallas Howard is a queen. She’s so beautiful and talented. Chris Pratt was awesome. I loved how we got siblings again and I loved the call-back to the first one, where the Raptors are trying to kill Alan and co. when the T-Rex saves them and in this one Blue and Rexy fight the Indominus together. I love this movie. I cannot wait for the next one (it’s my favourite).

 

 

 

 

 

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review 2019-01-19 23:18
Bright Ruin by Vic James
Bright Ruin - Vic James

 

Book #3 in the Dark Gifts Trilogy 

 

๏ ๏ ๏ Highlights ๏ ๏ ๏

 
Alternate/Dystopian-ish Society
Magic
Fantastical Elements
Intrigue
Good Triumphing Over Evil
A Small Splish of Romance

Audiobook Narrated by Evita Jay
 

 

๏ ๏ ๏  My Thoughts ๏ ๏ ๏ 

 
What can I say...that was a satisfying ending to an intriguing series.  While I found the first book in this series hard to decipher with all the ginormous words that I never heard before being thrown around like everyday language,  I honestly didn't know if I would continue the series.  That is until I tried the Audio version with book #2.  With the easy to understand narration from Evita Jay, I found a way to like this sesquipedalian*writing style of Vic James.

The unique alternative slash dystopian-ish modern day British setting and the captivating characters...from the good to the bad and the completely unusual made this possible for me to really get into the story, despite being confused at times.  The ending was unexpected, but it completely worked.

*I totally looked that word up...and I think I used it correctly.
 

๏ ๏ ๏  MY RATING ๏ ๏ ๏ 

 
☆4.3☆STARS - GRADE=A-
 
 
 
 

๏ Breakdown of Ratings ๏ 

Plot⇝ 4.2/5
Narration Performance⇝ 4.3/5
Main Characters⇝ 4/5
Secondary Characters⇝ 4/5
The Feels⇝ 4/5
Pacing⇝ 4/5
Addictiveness⇝ 3.8/5
Theme or Tone⇝ 4/5
Flow (Writing Style)⇝ 3.8/5
Backdrop (World Building)⇝ 3.8/5
Originality⇝ 5/5
Ending⇝ 4.7/5 Cliffhanger⇝ Nah...
๏ ๏ ๏
Book Cover⇝  It's amazing...
Setting⇝ An Alternate Britain
Source⇝ Audiobook (Library)
๏ ๏ ๏
  

๏ ๏ ๏ Links ๏ ๏ ๏

Kindle eBook | Audio

Add to Goodreads | Add to Booklikes 


Disclaimer: As an Amazon Associate, I earn from qualifying purchases.



 

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text 2019-01-19 03:03
Movie Review: Jurassic Park: The Lost World

 

Title: Jurassic Park: The Lost World
Release Date: 1997
Starring: Jeff Goldblum, Julianne Moore, Vince Vaughn, Pete Postlethwaite
Length: 2h 9min
Rating: 14A

 

Favourite character: Kelly


Crush: Ian Malcolm & Nick Van Owen
Least favourite character: Dieter Stark
Favourite line: Basically everything Ian Malcolm says

 

Mini-Review: These movies always make me feel slightly sick to be completely honest. I tend to veer away from movies like this, monster dinosaur movies that eat people. Scares the crap out of me. But I watched these movies for a kid I babysit and became strangely fascinated. So while I watch, nauseated, I just focus on Jeff Goldblum. That’s all I really have to say.

 

 

 

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text 2019-01-18 01:00
Around the World in 80 Books Mostly by Female Authors: Master Update Post

[World map created with Mapchart.net]

 

The aim: To diversify my reading and read as many books as possible (not necessarily 80) set in, and by authors from, countries all over the world.  Female authors preferred.  If a book is set in a location other than that of the author's nationality, it can apply to either (but not both).

 

On the map I'm only tracking new reads, not also rereads.

 

The Books:

Africa

 

 

 

Americas

USA

Michelle Obama: Becoming (new)

 

 

 

Asia

China

Xinran: The Good Women of China (new)

 

Japan

Shizuko Natsuki: Murder at Mt. Fuji (new)

 

 

 

Australia / Oceania

 

 

 

Europe

United Kingdom

Lorna Nicholl Morgan: Another Little Murder (new)

Stephen Fry, John Woolf, Nick Baker: Stephen Fry's Victorian Secrets (new)

 

Ireland

Tana French: The Witch Elm (new)

 

Greece

Stephen Fry: Mythos (new)

 

 

 

 

 

The "Gender Wars" Stats:

Read to date, in 2019:

Books by female authors: 5

- new: 5

- rereads:

 

Books by male authors: 2

- new: 2

- rereads:

 

Books by F & M mixed teams / anthologies:

- new:

- rereads:

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review 2019-01-16 18:50
Christie-esque? Hardly.
Murder at Mt. Fuji - Shizuko Natsuki

Ugh.  If I believed the publisher's hype that this is among the best that Japanese crime fiction has to offer, I'd be done with Japanese crime fiction here and now.

 

Natsuki knows how to write "atmosphere", but how she could ever have become (according to her American publisher) "one of Japan's most popular mystery writers" is utterly beyond me.  And while I do believe that Natsuki really was trying to copycat Agatha Christie, all she produces is an overly convoluted plot and a novel brimming with inconsistencies.  From egregious scene continuity issues to essential information being gathered "off stage" by teams of policemen elsewhere, to characters behaving purely as the author's plot sequencing and writerly convenience dictates (with little to no regard for, and repeatedly even contrary to what should have been both their inner and their outer response to events), to a clichéd "woman facing off against villain during dark and stormy night" final scene, the novel abounds with things that either should have been weeded out in the editing process or should have prevented it from being published altogether. 

 

Worst IMHO, however, are the police, who

 

* let a family -- all of whom are suspects -- merrily go on living in the very house that constitutes the crime scene without having cleared the scene first (thus affording the suspects plenty of opportunity to tamper with the scene ... which promptly happens),

* give press conferences in the very building that constitutes the crime scene (again before the scene has been cleared -- allowing for the reporters to further muddy the scene),

* allow the suspects to be present at those press conferences (oddly, without a single reporter showing any interest in approaching the suspects -- instead, the reporters wait until most of them have finally departed to Tokyo, to then fruitlessly stalk the premises from outside at night),

* reveal every last scrap of information -- including and in particular things only known to the police and the culprit(s) -- to the press,

* and involve a civilian who only a day earlier had still been one of the suspects (and should actually be charged with conspiring to conceal a crime / as an accomplice after the fact) in an ill-conceived, risk-prone, and promptly almost fatally derailed scheme to entrap the killer.

 

Oh, and did I mention that -- though I can't comment on the substantive details of the Japanese legal provision central to the plot (which gets cite-checked to numbing point in the final part of the novel) -- Natsuki's research, if any, on the legal issues that I can comment on is seriously off as well?  (Which, in turn, may actually explain the otherwise inexplicably stupid behaviour of one particular character.)

 

Well, I guess at least I finally get to check this one off my TBR ... and check off Japan on my "Around the World in 80 Books" challenge.

 

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