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review 2017-10-14 16:32
The Malice by Peter Newman
The Malice - Peter C. Newman

Series: The Vagrant #2

 

Years have passed since the events of The Vagrant. I'm not certain of how many, but one review I found said it had been twelve years, which is consistent with how Vesper acts. Vesper, the little baby from the first book, takes centre stage as the main character of this one. When the Vagrant, whom she calls Father, doesn't answer Gamma's sword's call (the Malice), Vesper tries to take it to those who would help. Instead of being accompanied by the old goat, Vesper takes along the old goat's baby kid who is adorable and instrumental in the story (and not just as bait). The kid held the book at three stars, despite some of the clumsiness in parts.

 

This is basically an alternate fantasy world with technology that has fallen into a kind of Dystopia after the world is invaded by the infernals through the Breach (a kind of crack in reality). Infernals take over human bodies (sometimes in gross combinations) in order to survive in the new world. Something massive that's being called the Yearning is making its way through the Breach with potentially dire results for everybody, even for the infernals already there, halfbreeds and tainted humans. It is hoped that the Malice will be able to stop the Yearning, which is why Vesper journeys south.

 

Despite feeling fuzzy on how much time has passed since the events of the first book, I'm pretty confident that the source I found stating twelve years is pretty close if not spot on because Vesper certainly acts like she's twelve or thirteen and by the end of the book she's physically grown a bit. So I'm comfortable using this for the "Chilling Children" square for the Halloween Bingo. It could also be used the "Supernatural" and "Genre: Horror" squares, I think.

 

I know I mentioned that the kid is adorable but he's seriously adorable.

 

Previous update:

13 %

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text 2017-10-11 18:30
Reading progress update: I've read 13%.
The Malice - Peter C. Newman

I'm trying to read this for "Chilling Children" but I don't have a clear idea of how old Vesper is. She sounds young and is referred to as a "girl" but if there are clues in the text, I've missed them. I don't remember how long it was after the world was invaded that she was born.

 

I did find this blog article that indicates that she's about twelve, which would match how old she seems, but I don't know if that's right. If it is, then I should be able to use this book for "Chilling Children". I tried reading "The Turn of the Screw" because it was short but I didn't make it more than two pages into it before I gave up...

 

There is an adorable baby goat following Vesper around though. Actually, I've just noticed that she's carrying it on the cover.

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text 2017-08-01 22:12
England (the Southern / Central Part), from East to West and Back: Bookish Souvenirs
Jane Austen's Hampshire - Terry Townsend
The Book of Margery Kempe - Margery Kempe,Barry Windeatt
Intimate Letters of England's Queens - Margaret Sanders
1415: Henry V's Year of Glory - Ian Mortimer
Bosworth: The Birth of the Tudors - Chris Skidmore
Constable in Love: Love, Landscape, Money and the Making of a Great Painter - Martin Gayford
The Invention of Nature: The Adventures of Alexander von Humboldt, the Lost Hero of Science - Andrea Wulf
The House of Rothschild: Volume 2: The World's Banker: 1849-1999 - Niall Ferguson
The Malice of Unnatural Death - Michael Jecks
The Late Show - Michael Connelly

The Trip:

* Chiltern Hills and Thames Valley (to mystery lovers, aka "Midsomer County" -- though given that this is an area chock-full of quintessential(ly) English villages, it's no surprise that it also routinely provides locations for other series, such as Inspector Morse, The Vicar of Dibley, and of course, adaptations of Agatha Christie's mysteries ... Christie herself, after all, also spent her last years in this area, in a village just outside of Wallingford, where she is also buried.)

* Chawton: Jane Austen's home

* Gloucester and Malmesbury

* The Welsh Borderland: The Welsh Marches, Herefordshire, and Shropshire

* Bosworth and Leicester

* East Anglia: Norfolk, Ely, and Stour Valley (aka [John] Constable Country)

 

 

The Souvenirs:

* Jane Austen:

- Pride and Prejudice -- an imitation leather-bound miniature copy of the book's first edition

- Lady Susan -- audio version performed, inter alia, by Harriet Walter

- Teenage Writings (including, inter alia, Cassandra, Love and Freindship, and The History of England)

 

* Terry Townsend: Jane Austen's Hampshire (gorgeously illustrated hardcover)

* Hugh Thomson:

- Illustrations to Sense and Sensibility, Northanger Abbey, and Persuasion

- Illustrations to Mansfield Park and Emma

* Pen Vogler: Tea with Jane Austen

 

... plus other Austen-related bits, such as a playing card set featuring Hugh Thomson's illustrations for Pride and Prejudice, Sense and Sensibility, Emma, and Persuasion, two Austen first edition refrigerator magnets, two "Austen 200" designer pens, a Chawton wallpaper design notepad, and a set of Austen-related postcards.

 


* Margery Kempe: The Book of Margery Kempe
* Julian of Norwich: Revelations of Divine Love

(have read bits of pieces of both, but never yet the whole thing(s) -- something to be remedied soonish)

* Margaret Sanders (ed.):

- Letters of England's Queens

- Letters of England's Kings

("Queens" looks decidedly more interesting, but I figured since there were both volumes there ... Unfortunately, neither contains any Plantagenet correspondence, though; they both start with the Tudors.)

* Terry Jones: Medieval Lives

* Ian Mortimer:

- The Greatest Traitor: The Life of Sir Roger Mortimer, Ruler of England 1327-1330

- 1415: Henry V's Year of Glory

* Chris Skidmore: Bosworth -- The Birth of the Tudors

* David Baldwin: Richard III

* Richard Hayman: The Tudor Reformation

* Glyn E. German: Welsh History

(The last two are decidedly more on the "outline" side, but they're useful as fast, basic references)

* Martin Gayford: Constable in Love -- the painter John Constable, that is.

* Andrea Wulf: The Invention of Nature (yeah, I know, late to the party, but anyway ... and at least I got the edition with the black cover!)

* Chris Beardshaw: 100 Plants that almost changed the World (as title and cover imply, nothing too serious, but a collection of interesting tidbits nevertheless)

* Niall Ferguson: The House of Rothschild -- The World's Banker, 1849-1999

 

 

* Michael Jecks, Knights Templar:

- The Leper's Return

- The Boy-Bishop's Glovemaker

- The Devil's Acolyte

- The Chapel of Bones

- The Butcher of St. Peter's

- The Malice of Unnatural Death

   

* Shirley McKay: Hue & Cry (a mystery set in Jacobean St. Andrews, Scotland)

 

... and finally, two present-day mystery/thrillers, just to balance off (well, not really, but anyway ...) all that history:

 

* Jo Nesbø: The Snowman

* Michael Connelly: The Late Show
 

... plus several more mugs for my collection (because I clearly don't own enough of those yet), two Celtic knot bookmarks, a Celtic knot T-shirt, a Celic knot pin, a Celtic knot designer pen (can you tell I really like Celtic knot designs?), assorted handmade soaps and lavender sachets, and assorted further postcards and sticky notes, plus in-depth guidebooks of pretty much every major place I visited (which guidebooks I sent ahead by mail before leaving England, so they're currently still en route to my home).

 

ETA:

Oh, and then there's John le Carré's The Pigeon Tunnel, which I bought at the airport right before my departure and am currently reading.  Books that you buy at the departure for a trip do qualify for a vacation book haul, don't they?

 

 


Merken

Merken

Merken

Merken

Merken

Merken

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text 2017-04-30 15:24
Good things come to those who wait...
The Malice - Peter C. Newman
The Vagrant - Peter C. Newman
The Stars Are Legion - Kameron Hurley

Sweet! Kobo has a sale that actually includes a book I want!

 

Their Explore titles that are out of this world sale has several interesting books on for $3.99 and under (Canadian, not sure where else the sale is applicable if anywhere), including The Malice by Peter Newman, which I had been dithering about buying because it's normally $13.99. Now it's $2.99! So I won't be getting it from the library after all.

  

The first book in the series, The Vagrant, is on sale too ($1.99), but I already have that. The Stars Are Legion by Kameron Hurley is on sale for $3.99 in case someone has been looking for an excuse to pick that up (it's pretty awesome).

 

The sale is on until May 8th. Currently looking through the lists for more pleasant surprises...

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review 2016-07-10 15:57
Book Review: The Malice by Peter Newman
The Malice - Peter C. Newman


In the south, the Breach stirs.

Gamma’s sword, the Malice, wakes, calling to be taken to battle once more.

But the Vagrant has found a home now, made a life and so he turns his back, ignoring its call.

The sword cries out, frustrated, until another answers.

Her name is Vesper.

 

 

Thanks to Harper Voyager Australia for the review copy. 

 

I love Newman's writing. It's as poetic as it is intelligent, beautiful as it is brutal. However, The Malice wandered about feeling plotless for the first 300 pages. I just didn't feel.. Involved? Not sure if that's the right word exactly, but when a book takes me a month to finish, there's usually a good reason that it's just not gripping me by the lapels and screaming into my face to finish it. In this case, I believe it's because it felt muddled until around page 350..

I suppose I could understand it from an academic standpoint; there's possibly a literary device there to help underpin and highlight Vesper's unplanned adventure. The reader feels just as lost as the MC. You feel that 'not sure what's next' feeling. I just didn't really want to feel so lost.. I've got real life to do that in.. :)

 

 

To be utterly honest, the most empathy I felt for a character, was for the kid goat... And I really need that connection to at least one character, to feel truly involved. I don't have to like the characters, but I do need to feel something toward them. Dislike  is just as powerful..

 

It's entirely possible it was just the wrong time for me to read it, as I felt nothing of this during The Vagrant. I almost feel like I'm betraying The Vagrant by being so apathetic toward The Malice! 

I will absolutely still read #3; there's a need in me to understand this world more fully, and the enjoyment I feel from Newman's wordery is worth every second spent. So, let the adventure continue.... 

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