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review 2017-04-14 22:57
#25 - The Wicked Will Rise by Danielle Paige
The Wicked Will Rise (Dorothy Must Die) - Danielle Paige

It was a nice continuation to the series. Some parts were weird and I could not really understand what the author was trying to do... but the story is not over, so I guess I will have some answers in the next books.

 

I love seeing new characters, and I love the fact that I could identify them. I'm not done with the original Oz books yet, I still have a bunch to read. But it was nice to meet the daughter of the Rainbow and Button Bright. I really, really love this retelling (almost as much as I love the original story... almost)!

 

This second book was not as great as the first one though (and was also way shorter), but it was still really pleasant. I'm excited about the rest of the series!

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review 2017-04-13 13:00
Book Tour Review that I am Involved with.
Rise of the Branded (The Scar of the Downers Book 2) - Scott Keen

Rise of the Branded
Scott Keen
(Scar of the Downers, #2)
Publication date: November 22nd 2016
Genres: Fantasy, Young Adult

Pursued into the wild by the soldiers of Ungstah, former slave Crik and the other freed Downers encounter the magical and terrifying nature of their world. They face spectral Shepherds, man-eating Rukmush, and the ancient giants of the earth. When two of their group are captured, Crik is distraught and powerless.

Meanwhile back in the city, Durgan, former Captain of the King’s Guard who allowed Crik and his friends to escape from Ungstah, is now a Downer, one of the Branded. Amid the murmurings of an uprising among the Branded, Durgan just wants to be left alone to search for his missing son. But in the process, he discovers how dark the powers of Sulfus the king truly are. Durgan must take a stand in the coming war between the Branded and the powerful armies of Sulfus.

To kill any hope of escape for the city’s Branded, the army comes after Crik and his friends to make an example of them. The answers for Durgan, Crik and freedom for all Downers lie hidden in the dark recesses of the Northern Reaches, in the treacherous places Crik and his companions are about to enter.

Goodreads / Amazon / Barnes & Noble

My Review

Just like the first book I really loved the friendship between Crik and Jak, even though there more like brothers. This one had a lot of even more things happening, then the first book. 

One character that is really interesting me in this book is a guy by the name of Durgan. In the first book something happened and him and his wife became a Downer, if you read the book or the description above you'll know what he did. I am really interested in what is going to happen to him and his wife. 

There are so many other interesting individuals in this series. I feel really bad about things that happened to Crik in this book. I really hope things work out for both Crik and Jak in the end.

I have to say I think after this book, the next book is probably going to be pretty explosive, and very action pack. So I can't wait to find out when the next book will be available, because I will definitely be wanting to read it as soon as it's available. I really want that book in my greedy little hands right now. But I will try and be a good girl and wait, but it will definitely be hard.

I am so glad I voluntarily requested to take part in this awesome book blog tour, it was a lot of fun.

 

Author Bio:

Scott grew up in Black River, NY, the youngest of three children. While in law school, he realized he didn’t want to be a lawyer. So he did the practical thing – he became a writer. Now, many years later with an MFA in script and screenwriting, he is married with four daughters, two of whom he home schools.

Website / Goodreads

 

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review 2017-04-09 22:04
Tyrant: Rise of the Beast by Brian Godawa
Tyrant: Rise of the Beast (Chronicles of the Apocalypse Book 1) - Brian Godawa

Although I do not hold to the preterist view of Revelation that the author does, this book was very compelling and quickly drew me in. My only critique is that is was too short, (it ends at 50% and the rest is an appendix), but the appendix did hold a wealth of information that was just as fascinating!
A great start to a new trilogy which follows after the Chronicles of the Nephilim series.
Highly recommended!

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text 2017-03-31 20:01
My March 2017
Everything Reminds You of Something Else - Elana Wolff
Entsetzen - Karin Slaughter
Rise of the Chosen - Anna Kopp
All the strangest things are true. - April Genevieve Tucholke,Anne Brauner
The Best We Could Do - Thi Bui
Shadow of a Girl - Shannon Greenland
Ein Gerücht kommt selten allein - Brigitte Teufl-Heimhilcher
Everything Reminds You of Something Else - 3 stars
Entsetzen - 5 stars
Rise of the Chosen - 3 stars
All the strangest things are true. - 3 stars
The Best We Could Do - 5 stars
Shadow of a Girl - 5 stars
Ein Gerücht kommt selten allein - 4 stars

 

 

Favorite book(s) of the month: Entsetzen, The Best we Could Do

 

Books started this month but haven't finished yet: Tote Augen

 

7 books, man. What is happening at the moment? I can't believe I'm getting through so many books. I also haven't read any book this month that I didn't enjoy, so I'm pretty happy with my reading choices in march.

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review 2017-03-28 17:48
An insightful and clear introduction to Laing’s life and work in time for his rediscovery
Ronald Laing: The rise and fall and rise of a radical psychiatrist - David Boyle

I’m writing this review as a member of Rosie’s Book Review Team. I was provided with an ARC copy of the book that I voluntarily chose to review.

I’m a psychiatrist and although I studied Medicine in Spain I have trained as a psychiatrist in the UK. Despite that, R.D. Laing and his ideas weren’t a part of our curriculum (I don’t know if things have changed now, as that was almost 25 years ago). During one of my training jobs, one of the psychotherapy tutors showed us a recording of an interview with R.D. Laing and he talked to us about him. He came across as a fascinating man with very interesting ideas, quite contrary to the standard focus on biological psychiatry, evidence-based interventions and emphasis on classification and symptoms rather than people. I read several of his books at the time and although I was fascinated by his ideas I didn’t have the time to study his figure and the rest of his work in detail.

This short book (the text takes up around 88% of the book as after that there are some extracts from other books from the same publisher, The Real Press) does an excellent job of highlighting both the person (the biography is succinct but it manages to include the salient points of his family life, his work experience and how both influenced his ideas) and his works. It also places Laing’s figure in its historical and socio-political era, linking it to other thinkers and movements of the time (hippy movement, antipsychiatry, existentialism, LSD culture…). Due to its length, it is not an exhaustive study of the individual works but it presents a good overview that will allow those who’ve never heard of R.D. Laing to gain some familiarity with his life and his work, and will bring together loose ends for those who might have read some of his works but don’t know how they fit into his career (because, as the author points out, some of Laing’s books are very difficult to understand). This text also provides a good guide to students interested in going deeper into Laing’s work and offers suggestions for further reading (both of Laing’s own works and of works about him). The book is being launched to coincide with the premier of a movie about Laing called ‘Mad to Be Normal’ starring David Tennant, and it should be a great complement to those who might come out of the movie intrigued and wanting to know more without embarking on complex theoretical books (that are very much of their time).

Boyle does a great job of extracting the most important aspects of Laing’s work and life and shows a good understanding and empathy towards the man and his ideas. Rather than focus exclusively on the most scandalous aspects of his life, he emphasises his care for patients, his own disturbed childhood, and how he insisted patients were unique and not just cogs in a machine that had to learn to show the required and accepted behaviour. Although many of his ideas have been discredited, his feelings about the profession and his insistence on listening to patients and putting their needs first resonate today as much as they did at the time. Personally, I’m pleased to see his figure is being re-evaluated. Never too soon.

Laing is one of these people whose life and scandals throw a big shadow over his work, but this book and, hopefully, the movie, might help new generations to rediscover him.

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