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review 2021-07-24 21:13
The List of Things That Will Not Change
The List of Things That Will Not Change - Rebecca Stead

As I’ve grown older, I realize how my perspective has changed, especially when I read different genres and consider which character I am relating to the most. When I read Middle Grade fiction, there is still a tiny part of me that unabashedly relates to the main character, despite what my appearance would lead you to believe. In Rebecca Stead’s newest book, I am acutely aware of being a parent, and in awe of the kindness, empathy, and generosity she has given to her characters. The “list” provides a brilliant device for Bea to work through the lows and highs of divorce and new beginnings. Stead, with her sharp, moving and compelling writing, shows all of us how to approach a complicated life with grace and humor.

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review 2021-06-29 03:01
The Past And Other Things That Should Stay Buried - Shaun David Hutchinson
The Past and Other Things that Should Stay Buried - Shaun David Hutchinson
What an incredible story of friendship and love.
I wasn't sure I was going to enjoy this book. Not the biggest ghost story/zombie lover, but let me tell you how well this story was written. You know when you're younger, and you get a boyfriend or girlfriend and they become your world. Your friends always take a back seat, so-to-speak. It always happens, not purposely, but still.  Now imagine if that friend of yours died suddenly. You'd be so stunned at how to deal, so many unsaid things.
Well, this story does that with an unusual twist. 
That twist actually turned out to be good too! I devoured this book, 'cause I had to know what was going to happen. Would they get a resolution? 
Every question was answered and it is now one of my favorites from this author!
On a side note, I had no idea I was reading a LGBTQ book during Pride month and that made me smile too! Love Is Love!
 
 
Source: www.fredasvoice.com/2021/06/the-past-and-other-things-that-should.html
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review 2020-10-05 05:43
All Things Huge and Hideous by G. Scott Huggins
All Things Huge And Hideous - G. Scott Huggins

TITLE: All Things Huge and Hideous

 

AUTHOR:  G. Scott Huggins

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DESCRIPTION:

 

"IF YOU CAN READ THIS, THANK A TEACHER.IF YOU CAN READ THIS AND YOU HAVEN'T BEEN FED TO THE DRAGON, THANK A VET.That's me, Dr. James DeGrande. Fire-lizards deflamed, dire-rats spayed, flea and tick removal a speciality. I'm your local veterinarian, but I'm also a slave of the Dark Lord. I've hired a new assistant Harriet, who is almost a witch. I just hope that she can do better than my last assistant who ... almost survived.There's no more heroes anymore. That's because they were all fed to the Dark Lord's pet Dragon after the last War.It's not the easiest position from which to make the world a better place, but I might be able to do something about the dragon. If His Darkness's vampiric Prime Minister doesn't do something about me first. It's time to go see my patients, and hope they don't see me first."

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REVIEW:

 

This is a compilation of vignettes in the life of the Dark Lord's human veterinarian and his assistant.  Entertaining and amusing. 

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review 2020-09-05 01:18
THE HOLLOW PLACES BY: T. KINGFISHER
The Hollow Places - T. Kingfisher

I think this book will stay with me for awhile, I'm afraid the willows have taken root. I know many people draw the obvious parallels with Lovecraft, but for me this one also had some vibes that brought up touchstones from The Mist (Stephen King) and a smidge of Pan's Labyrinth. Definitely that dark otherworldliness but also the religious and/or mythical undertones throughout.

 

Sometimes the vastness and imagination that goes into multiverses can be overwhelming but I thought this was beautifully balanced by the characters, with their lightness and their dark humor and being so down-to-earth (which is funny, all things considered!). Carrot and Simon, and even Uncle Earl help even things out and brought levity to a quagmire of disturbing otherness.

 

The disquieting undertones all throughout was classic horror that I greatly appreciate. It's like a feeling you get that something is behind you and that paralyzing moment where you're deciding whether to look or not, to quickly escape or rationalize it away. In willow world or not, that feeling stays with you throughout the story and it's fabulously unsettling. On the flip side the vivid picture painted with some of the more in your face creepy situations, like the bus or Sturdivant, was grotesquely clear and so easily visualized.

I think my favorite part of all though was the last part in the Museum. It brought a whole new heartwarming element to the tale that I wasn't expecting. For lack of a better term, there really is no place like home, and the idea that your home might feel that way about you too is quite touching. All in all this was a fast paced enthralling read and I definitely look forward to reading more from this author in the future.

 

I received an arc of this book from Gallery Books via Netgalley and this is my honest review.

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review 2020-08-17 09:49
German: Biography of a Language by Ruth H. Sanders
German: Biography of a Language - Ruth H. Sanders

TITLE: German: Biography of a Language

 

AUTHOR:  Ruth H. Sanders

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DESCRIPTION:

"Thousands of years ago, seafront clans in Denmark began speaking the earliest form of Germanic language--the first of six "signal events" that Ruth Sanders highlights in this marvelous history of the German language.

Blending linguistic, anthropological, and historical research, Sanders presents a brilliant biography of the language as it evolved across the millennia. She sheds light on the influence of such events as the bloody three-day Battle of Kalkriese, which permanently halted the incursion of both the Romans and the Latin language into northern Europe, and the publication of Martin Luther's German Bible translation, a "People's" Bible which in effect forged from a dozen spoken dialects a single German language. The narrative ranges through the turbulent Middle Ages, the spread of the printing press, the formation of the nineteenth-century German Empire which united the German-speaking territories north of the Alps, and Germany's twentieth-century military and cultural horrors. The book also covers topics such as the Gothic language (now extinct), the vast expansion of Germanic tribes during the Roman era, the role of the Vikings in spreading the Norse language, the branching off of Yiddish, the lasting impact of the Thirty Years War on the German psyche, the revolution of 1848, and much more.

Ranging from prehistoric times to modern, post-war Germany, this engaging volume offers a fascinating account of the evolution of a major European language as well as a unique look at the history of the German people. It will appeal to everyone interested in German language, culture, or history.
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REVIEW:

 

Interesting and informative, but too repetitive.

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