logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: three-little-pigs
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
review 2018-02-23 02:56
Piggie Pie
Piggie Pie! - Margie Palatini,Howard Fine

Are you smart enough to outsmart a witch? Thats what you should ask young readers when they finish this story! Piggie Pie is a precious book that details the story of a witch on the prowl for some piggies. This book is full of adjectives and alliterations! Students could go on an adjective search while reading this book. I would personally love to work with other teachers on my grade level to produce a live reading of this text using our students as actors!

 

Piggie Pie play: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EwZAbhgbtUc

 

Guided Reading - L

Lexile - 420L

DRA - 20

AR - 2.5

Like Reblog Comment
review 2018-02-06 23:41
Whose Side Are You On?
The True Story of the 3 Little Pigs - Jon Scieszka,Lane Smith

AR: 3.0

Grade Level: 2-4

Summary: We've all read some form of The Three Little Pigs, right? Well, THE TRUE STORY OF THE 3 LITTLE PIGS! is an excellent book to read to young readers. It's even an excellent book for them to read even to themselves! This particular book is all about perspective, from the text even to the illustrations! It's extremely hilarious, even with relatable moments. 

Idea: I will use this book in my classroom for a unit about perspective. I may even have my students take the role of either a pig or the wolf, and act out how each character sees things from their pespective. 

Like Reblog Comment
review 2018-02-04 19:42
Charlotte's Web
Charlotte's Web - E.B. White,Garth Williams,Rosemary Wells

I can not say enough good things about this story. I read this book as a child, and have re-read it as an adult. The message still holds true! The text is so rich and filled with sensory details. I would love to do an entire novel study on this book. I would start by reading the chapters aloud to students. This would be a wonderful time to reflect on the language and have them turn and talk to discuss specific phrases. I would use this book in science lessons and study spiders! I would ask students to draw and label the parts of a spider. I would also extend this theme into writing. I would give the students several prompts while covering this text, such as: Would you like to have a pet pig? How did Charlotte save Wilbur's life? Choose an adjective that describes you; draw it in a web and write a paragraph explaining why you chose it. A fun way to end this unit would be to act out the story, or to watch the movie!

 

Guided Reading - R

Lexile - 680L

DRA - 40 

AR - 4.4

 

 

Like Reblog Comment
review 2018-02-04 18:54
If You Give A Pig A Pancake
If You Give a Pig a Pancake - Laura Joffe Numeroff,Felicia Bond

If You Give A Pig A Pancake is one of my FAVORITE stories. I can recite this story without looking at the words! The text is easy to read, silly, and accompanied by beautiful illustrations. There are so many activities that can accompany this title! I used this book to demonstrate a cooking lesson with preschoolers! I allowed them to make their own pancake batter. They made predictions about what would happen when they added specific ingredients. They especially loved enjoying a yummy snack! A sequencing map would be easy to include while covering this text. I think it would be fun for students to write about their favorite pancake toppings or construct a recipe and describe how to cook pancakes.

 

Guided Reading - L

Lexile - 480L

DRA - 18

AR - 2.5

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-01-17 19:43
Pigs in Heaven by Barbara Kingsolver
Pigs In Heaven - Barbara Kingsolver

I have a theory about the genesis of this novel. By the time she wrote her first novel, the beloved The Bean Trees, it’s clear that Kingsolver was already deeply invested in social justice issues. But she missed one when her protagonist, a young woman named Taylor, traveled through Cherokee tribal lands in Oklahoma just long enough to unwittingly rescue a battered native toddler dumped on her by a frightened aunt. And when Taylor returned, with the best of intentions, it was to fraudulently adopt the child without the knowledge of the tribe.

As I envision events, a Cherokee reader talked to Kingsolver about this, pointing out that Cherokee have large extended families who would miss the child; that after a long history of genocide and other abuses at the hands of white America, including the removal of children, tribes need to hang onto their kids if they are to survive (hence the Indian Child Welfare Act, which among other things prohibits outside adoptions without the tribe’s consent); and that Taylor, who is physically and culturally white despite a Cherokee great-grandparent, is unequipped to teach Turtle about her heritage or how to deal with racism.

So Kingsolver, as we all should do when confronted with our oversights, recognized the problem and set out to fix it. And this sequel was born.

Pigs in Heaven picks up three years after the end of The Bean Trees. Turtle gets her fifteen minutes of fame when she witnesses an accident, and a newly-minted Cherokee lawyer named Annawake – who has a personal stake in ICWA – hears her story and realizes something is fishy. After a visit from Annawake, Taylor panics and takes off with Turtle, but her mother, Alice – just out of a brief and unsatisfying marriage – takes a different tack, going to stay with a relative on tribal lands in hopes of amicably resolving the problem and getting to know Turtle’s extended family.

I actually liked this book better than The Bean Trees; Kingsolver has clearly matured as an author. The plot is more focused and cohesive and flows smoothly, without ever feeling slow. It follows several major characters while keeping everything moving and the reader eager to know what will happen next. It examines the central issues from all sides and with empathy for everyone involved, all of whom make mistakes but are trying to do the best they can for Turtle. Yes, it can be predictable, but in this case I don’t see that as a flaw; this story is built not on suspense but on family relationships, and I enjoyed sinking into the characters’ journey and guessing at where it would lead them. The writing style is good and endows the book with warmth and wisdom.

Meanwhile, Kingsolver seems to have done her research, or rather the friends she credits in the acknowledgments did a thorough job of educating her. I read a legit Cherokee book right after this in part to check her facts, which checked out. But there are also subtle things, like the story that’s told to two different people and slightly differently each time, that readers familiar with Cherokee culture will likely appreciate. If anything, life on tribal lands seems a little idealized – there’s a lot of family values, community and tradition, with social problems acknowledged but kept out of sight – though much of this is related through Alice’s point-of-view, and I suspect that her experiences as a visitor to tribal lands were, reasonably enough, based on Kingsolver’s.

My two issues with the book aren’t with the writing. One is that there are several continuity errors between the first book and this one. The legal first name (April) that Taylor gave Turtle on adoption vanishes; Alice and Taylor’s Cherokee ancestor changes from a grandfather to a grandmother (significant because clan passes through the female line); Taylor’s father goes from a mystery man about whom Alice would only say that he was nobody Taylor knew to an ex-husband about whom she’s not reluctant to speak when necessary. The other is more about judging other people’s parenting than anything else. Taylor makes several questionable choices that are never called out in the narrative, from moving herself and Turtle in with a boyfriend about whom she’s not that serious, to telling the real story of her abandonment on national TV – which is not only stupid because it’s inconsistent with official records, but publicly telling the story in front of Turtle and allowing it to be made light of seems hurtful. But real people aren't perfect, so characters shouldn't be either.

Overall, I really enjoyed this book, which tells a compelling story about contemporary issues, with good writing and populated by sympathetic characters. I read it quickly and was fully engaged with the story and characters, which doesn't happen as often as I'd like these days. I recommend it, whether or not you read The Bean Trees first.

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?