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review 2018-06-13 16:32
The Shepherd's Crown (Discworld #41, Tiffany Aching #5)
The Shepherd's Crown (Tiffany Aching) - Terry Pratchett

Endings are sad no matter if it happens suddenly or you know it’s been coming for some time, but all good things come to an end.  The Shepherd’s Crown is the final book of Tiffany Aching journey into mature witch as well as the 41st and last Discworld book by Terry Pratchett.  Not only was this the last book, finished before Pratchett’s death, but saw the biggest development in the series ever—warning spoilers below.

 

While Tiffany Aching continues work as the Chalk’s witch both see and Jeannie the kelda feel something is about to happen, which it does with the death of Granny Weatherwax in Lancre that sets off a chain of events.  Granny leaves everything, including her steading, to Tiffany thus making her be seen as “first among equals” amongst witches.  But the death of Granny results in a weakened barrier between the Disc and Fairyland as many elves seeing the Queen as scared and cautious after her defeat by Tiffany years before and it only grows when they learn goblins have been accepted in human society and that iron—railways—now rule the land.  The Queen is usurped by Lord Peaseblossom who begins raiding into Lancre and the Chalk, which adds to Tiffany’s burden of covering two steadings in to locales that becomes a bit easier when a Geoffrey leaves his noble family and travels to Lancre to become a witch and turns out to have some talent—for a man.  Gathering together witch allies, the Feegles, elderly men looking for a fight, and the deposed Queen to battle an invasion, Tiffany uses the power in the Chalk to defeat Peaseblossom—who killed the Queen in battle—then summon the King of the Elves—who kills the usurper for killing his wife—to prevent them from ever returning.  Afterwards Tiffany knowing no witch can replace Granny give the Lancre steading to Geoffrey then builds herself a hut from the bones of her own grandmother’s hut to have an official residence of her own.

 

Pratchett did not complete this book as he would have liked to as Neil Gaiman stated in a later interview and the clues were there for a more emotional ending and closure for fans, but this unfortunate missed opportunity does not detract seriously from the book.  On the whole, the plot and character developments were nearly perfect with the only except of Mrs. Earwig who felt like she had more to be developed but that Pratchett hadn’t had enough time to provide it.

 

The Shepherd’s Crown is a book of endings for numerous reasons and because of that some people do not want to read it, especially those who have been fans longer than I have.  However eventually I hope those people will eventually read Terry Pratchett’s last Discworld book and see that even right up to his own meeting with Death that he strove to create something that made you think and show your emotions.

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review 2017-12-18 16:43
The Shepherd's Crown (Tiffany Aching) - Terry Pratchett

I was so afraid to read this. It is Sir Terry's last work, and the last we will learn of wonderful, beloved, human Tiffany Aching and her steading, her story, her universe. It could be more perfect but it is perfect enough. The book is dedicated to Esme Weatherwax, and she is as she would be and as she is needed to be, and so I say, Terry: same to you, thank you, thank you, thank you.

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review 2017-05-21 00:00
Review: The Shepherd's Crown (Discworld Book 49 of 49ish!)
The Shepherd's Crown (Tiffany Aching) - Terry Pratchett

The Shepherd’s Crown is the last Tiffany Aching book and, published after the author’s death, it’s the last book in the entire Discworld series.  It’s very short, not having been completely fleshed out by Pratchett before his death, but it tells a complete story.  Tiffany, now a full-fledged witch, finds her responsibilities increasing beyond her ability to keep up.  Meanwhile, the elves are getting up to mischief again.

 

Unlike the last Discworld book I had read, the characters didn’t feel off to me, with one possible exception from a character who was only in the book for a page or two.  I also enjoyed the story pretty well.  It wasn’t one of the best, but it didn’t bore me either.  However, one major aspect of this story was spoiled for me months ago, so the story had much less impact than it would have had otherwise. 

 

And so here I am, after starting the very first book one year and twenty-one days ago, at the end of the series.  I started it with skepticism, not really expecting to care for it since I don’t normally do well with satirical, wink-at-the-reader type humor.  I love humor in my books, but I’ve always preferred humor that feels like a natural extension of the story and its characters whereas this type of humor tends to pull me out of the story to admire the author’s cleverness and consider the real-world parallels.  Maybe I was in the right frame of mind when I decided to try this series, or maybe Pratchett just did it exceptionally well.  Whatever the reason, I enjoyed this series quite a bit. 

 

I don’t think I ever rated any of the books higher than four stars, because these aren’t the type of stories that I get completely wrapped up in.  And yet the fact that these books didn’t completely absorb me is one of the things I liked about them.  There were some I liked more than others but, in general, they were light, fun, and usually entertaining.  They were particularly excellent travel books because they didn’t demand my full attention.  I’m not much of a re-reader, but I could see myself picking some of them up again someday, maybe in a few years, as reading material while traveling.  It might also be fun to try them as audio books.

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review 2015-11-03 00:23
bysinginglight.wordpress.com/2015/11/02/october-2015-round-up
The Shepherd's Crown (Tiffany Aching) - Terry Pratchett

The last Tiffany Aching book, which just typing that makes me want to cry. There were many, many tears shed over this book, which was a perfect leave-taking for Tiffany and Pratchett himself. Even the dedication made me cry. Tiffany was my entrance into Pratchett’s books, so it seems extra-special to say good-bye to him with this one.

Source: bysinginglight.wordpress.com/2015/11/02/october-2015-round-up
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review 2015-10-12 09:47
The Shepherd's Crown by Terry Pratchett
The Shepherd's Crown (Tiffany Aching) - Terry Pratchett

Terry Pratchett was not able to fully complete this novel before his death. This is sad but also brings us so much closer to him: In the afterword we can read how he wrote his novels, that he had several scenes on his mind and then constructed the story as he went along. Most of The Shepherd's Crown is finished but there are also some scenes which don't seem to be much connected with the rest of the stoy. That doesn't matter, however. The book is still a fun and quick read.
But at the same time it's a sad read, not only because it's the final Discwolrd novel but also because of Granny Weatherwax's death. She was such a great character and Discworld is just not the same without her.

We will miss you, Terry Pratchett!

(I received a free digital copy via Netgalley/the publisher. Thanks for the opportunity!)

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