logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: toni
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2018-02-10 02:43
Reading progress update: I've read 136 out of 229 pages.
Jazz - Toni Morrison

Spring has sprung in the City; months gone by since, that Violet, Violent, at the funeral. author still takes us backwards while we go forwards, sometimes--a bit of Joe Trace's history, some of it downright scary, some of it with the kind of gaps you don't want to have. 

 

terrific book...I shall finish it tomorrow.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2018-02-10 00:54
Reading progress update: I've read 88 out of 229 pages.
Jazz - Toni Morrison

I love it. I was hoping I would...and I do. we have that whole "poetry in the prose" thing going on, which I love, when I'm in the mood, and the author is good at it...which she is. we've got the "bits and pieces of plot scattered about, with hidden care" approach flowing right along, which is great, when I want that, and when the author does an amazing job...which she does. wish it was longer...glad she has more books.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2018-02-09 14:44
Reading progress update: I've read 2 out of 229 pages.
Jazz - Toni Morrison

so, as of now, every second book--not counting graphic novels--will be a way of celebrating Black History Month, either because I am experiencing a Black author's words, or reading something like Darktown, which fits in with my goal too. naturally, the main focus is on Black authors. Jazz seems like a good place to start, because I love Jazz music, almost as much as Blues, and I love reading about the 1920s, and I have never read Toni Morrison. I read the Foreward already, and loved the way that was written, so I'm anticipating a great time with this book. I've got an Ethel Payne (journalist) biography handy--bought it just as I was about to start Tong Wars as my Nonfiction pick of the month, and debated putting Tong Wars aside at the time, but that's fine, I'll do two Nonfiction books this month--and Octavia Butler's Parable of the Sower is waiting on my shelves too. if I need something else to keep to the plan, late in the month, I'll visit the bookstore. meanwhile...Jazz!

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-02-01 21:17
Romance and murder.
A Cold Dark Place - Toni Anderson

I sometimes think that listening to the audio version of a thriller makes it harder to follow. No matter how well narrated it is, it's still difficult to go back over the bits you've missed, and as I'm usually doing something else at the same time, driving, ironing, washing-up, it's also easier to find yourself in that position. So, in order to write this review I have just been back and replayed the beginning of each chapter - especially the finalé. It was quite interesting listening again, knowing who was guilty.

Mallory Rooney is an FBI agent. She was parted from her twin sister eighteen years previously, when Paton was abducted from their bedroom. Mallory has joined the FBI in the hope that she might be able to shed some light on her sister's disappearance, and she is definitely not looking for a romantic relationship.
Professional assassin, Alex Parker, is also not looking for a love interest, but he and Mallory are drawn to each other from their very first meeting.

There is a killer on the loose, who is targeting young women; and women who go missing for no apparent reason have been tuning up some time later, dead, with the initials 'PR' cut into their skin. Mallory wonders about the coincidence that these were her sister's initials, but has no reason to connect the two.
However, it is when Mallory starts to suspect that she may be the killer's next target, that the tension builds.

Interestingly, there are a few chapters narrated from the point of view of the killer, although we do not know who s/he is. A couple of the victims have a chance to air their POVs.

Eric G. Dove did an excellent job of narrating A Cold Dark Place, although I found myself surprised that it was narrated by a man, I felt I'd expected a female narrator, given that a lot of the story was told from a woman's perspective.

My only problem with the book was the rather overplayed love scenes, which could have been seriously edited, but that's just my opinion.

 

 

 



 

 

 

 

 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-01-31 06:52
Games Creatures Play ed. by Charlaine Harris & Toni L.P. Kelner
Games Creatures Play - Charlaine Harris,Toni L.P. Kelner

Welcome to the wide world of paranormal pastimes, where striking out might strike you dead. Editors Charlaine Harris and Toni L. P. Kelner are your announcers for this all-new story collection of the most peculiar plays ever made… Sports fans live and die by their teams’ successes and failures—though not literally. But these fourteen authors have written spirited—in more ways than one—new tales of killer competitions that would make even the most die-hard players ask to be benched. These supernatural sporting stories are guaranteed to have you rooting for the home team…or else…

Goodreads.com

 

 

 

Edited by Charlaine Harris of Sookie Stackhouse series fame, along with co-editor Toni L.P. Kelner (they've previously collaborated on similar anthologies), these short stories are crafted by some of the biggest names in the supernatural / fantasy / sci-fi genres. Oh, and speaking of Sookie Stackhouse by the way, Harris includes a story featuring her into this mix.

 

Here, the stories are given a sports-themed twist just to keep things interesting. That's the concept anyway. After my reading experience, I came away feeling more like these were kind of like campfire stories... fun and mildly spooky in the moment but quickly forgettable once you're distanced from them. I also found the sports connection in many of the stories pretty loosely done. 

 

Each author gets a (usually comedic) bio blurb at the start of their story. I suspect each author wrote their own, but who knows. I'd say my favorite is the one for Mercedes Lackey, which opens with: "Mercedes Lackey was born in Chicago, Illinois on June 24, 1950. The very next day, the Korean War was declared. It is hoped that there is no connection between the two events."

 

Then there was the bio blurb of Adam-Troy Castro, the author of the Gustav Gloom series: "Adam-Troy Castro has historically brought the suck to any sport he has ever been coaxed into playing, but he has had a little bit more luck as a writer."

 

No surprise, my very favorite story in this collection was "Jammed" by Seanan McGuire, as she is one of my favorite authors and seeing her name on the cover was a primary reason for me purchasing the book in the first place. I can always count on her to come out with highly unique and wildly entertaining plots! I haven't yet gotten into the InCrytpid series, but I hear this story is supposed to fit into that world. 

 

In "Jammed", Antimony Price comes from a long line of monster hunters, but the Price family was supposed to be wiped out centuries ago. In this modern age she needs to keep a low profile, so she takes up the persona Annie Thompson, social worker / roller derby competitor (playing under the name Final Girl). At one of the roller derby meets, a girl from another team is murdered, her severed leg all that's left to identify. Looking at the leg, Antimony determines this was likely a non-human attacker. So, you can imagine that low-profile life is quickly eliminated as an option!

 

"I shove my phone into my pocket, shouting, 'Mom! I'm going to go fight a monster I can't identify yet!"

 

"Don't get decapitated, dear," she called back. 

 

I shook my head. "Parental oversight," I muttered, stepping outside. Sometimes it's hard to forget that I'm the youngest child in the family -- I came after the heir AND the spare, and my parents are happy if I make it through the day without setting anything on fire or dropping anyone who doesn't deserve it down a pit trap. Great for doing whatever I want without worrying about rules getting in my way, lousy if what I want is for my mother to realize that I'm running off to get myself killed and at least offer me an extra knife or something."

 

~ from "Jammed" by Seanan McGuire

 

The collection opens and closes with offerings from editors Harris & Kelner. It's a fun enough gathering of names in that you get to see them doing a little something different, creatively, with their craft, but most of these didn't leave me mindblown. I'd recommend solely off the Seanan McGuire story. 

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?