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text 2018-07-10 18:45
June 2018-That's A Wrap!
Providence: A Novel - Caroline Kepnes
Born a Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood - Trevor Noah
Hyenas - Michael Sellars
The Tea Party - Charles L. Grant,Matt Godfrey
Lucifer, Book One - Neil Gaiman,Ryan Kelly,James Hodgkins,Dean Ormston,Peter Gross,Chris Weston,Scott Hampton,Mike Carey
The Cabin at the End of the World - Paul Tremblay
Sea of Rust - C. Robert Cargill
They Feed - Jason Parent
The Woman in the Woods - John Connolly
An Exorcism of Angels - Stephanie M. Wytovich,Corinne Gahan

I only read 11 books last month! 

 

 

Graphic Novels

 

 

Lucifer, Book One by Mike Carey 5*

 

Total: 1

 

Novellas

 

Total: 0

 

Audiobooks 

 

Born a Crime: Stories From A South African Childhood by Trevor Noah 5*

The Tea Party by Charles Grant, narrated by Matt Godfrey 4*

An Exorcism of Angels by Stephanie M. Wytovich, (poetry) narrated by Corinne Gahan 4*

Sea of Rust by C. Robert Cargill, narrated by Eva Kaminski 3.5*

 

Total: 4

 

ARCS/Reads for Review

 

Hyenas by Michael Sellars 4*

Providence by Caroline Kepnes 4.5*

The Cabin at the End of the World by Paul Tremblay 4*

The Woman in the Woods by John Connolly 5*

Springfield Confidential: Jokes, Secrets & Outright Lies From a Lifetime of Writing for The Simpsons by Mike Reiss 4*

They Feed by Jason Parent 4*

 

Total: 6

 

 

 

Horror Aficionados Mount TBR Challenge:

Challenge: Read 40 Books Already on my TBR

 

1. City of the Dead by Brian Keene

2. The Warblers by Amber Fallon

3. October by Michael Rowe

4. It's A Bad, Bad, Bad, Bad World by Curtis Lawson

5. Bad Pennies by John Leonard

6.Cold in July by Joe Lansdale

7. Sea of Rust by C. Robert Cargill

 

 Running Total: 85

 

 

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review 2018-07-03 23:41
Born a Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood by Trevor Noah
Born a Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood - Trevor Noah

What a disappointment. Mr. Noah is at times really tone deaf to the point where he is quite the asshole troll you find on social media. No reflections, no really growth as a person can be found in these memoirs; Noah is emotionally stunted 19 year old. 

 

I did find his writing on apartheid interesting (in a completely horrifying way) and these parts of the book added to my (very limited) knowledge of South Africa. Growing up in the 1980s, the only things I knew about apartheid were that performers were outspoken against it and would not perform in SA and that Nelson Mandela was in jail because he worked to end apartheid. Seeing apartheid affect daily life through the stories Noah writes about gives me a deeper sense of how fucking evil white supremacy can be. 

 

Anything after apartheid ended and SA adapted to life with more freedoms, Noah loses me. By that time, he is a preteen/ young teenager and he is just a destructive asshole. WHY, O WHY, DID I HAVE TO READ ABOUT NOAH'S PHILOSPHY ABOUT DEFECTION? Seriously, the shitting went on for pages. Then when he wasn't shitting, he was setting things on fire, including setting a shed and house on fire - all without one ounce of remorse (because it was a white person's house and white people have insurance, so NBD). He and a friend stole from a candy store for weeks; when they were finally caught on camera, his friend got in trouble, but Noah didn't due to his skin color coming up too light (white) for him to be recognized.

 

Peak of Noah's "apartheid bad, unless I can use it to my advantage/use as an excuse" was the chapter on his DJing career and his dance posse. His friend, and best dancer in the crew, was named Hitler....Noah explained why names of evil assholes from Western (white) history are popular among South Africans, but when he took a job DJing at a Jewish school, there was not connection of his friend's name with the Holocaust. So a chant of his friend's name ended the show early and Noah getting into a heated exchange with the school's teachers. No looking back and seeing how this was a possibly upsetting, no sense of remorse for his actions or words, nothing. Just a pissed teenage Noah yelling at "some white lady". 

 

Honestly, I will look for other books on apartheid for more information. I don't think I got a lot out of the book re: apartheid to make up for all the other crap coming from Noah.

 

 

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text 2018-06-22 12:00
Friday Reads - June 22, 2018
Wishing Lake (A Finding Home Novel) - Regina Hart
After the Eclipse: A Mother's Murder, a Daughter's Search - Sarah Perry
The Spirit of '76: From Politics to Technology, the Year America Went Rock & Roll (Kindle Single) - David Browne
Born a Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood - Trevor Noah
Cafe Au Lait - Liane Spicer
Welcome to Last Chance - Cathleen Armstrong
If Ever I Would Leave You: A Montana Rescue Prequel - Susan May Warren
Submerged - Dani Pettrey

This week I read Wishing Lake by Regina Hart (my favorite in the Finding Home series...so far), After the Eclipse by Sarah Perry, and The Spirit of '76 by David Browne. I hope to get to reviewing those books over the weekend.

 

Something is screwy with USAFE's e-lending system, so I had to put One in a Million on the backburner until the system is working again.

 

This weekend I want to get Trevor Noah's Born a Crime (borrowed a physical copy from library) and Café Au Lait by Liane Spicer (PRIME lending library borrow) read. I need to write my personal essay and resume for my grad school applications. Transcripts have been ordered (I swear the Air Force loves to make easy, mundane tasks HELLA complicated via the Internet....). Waiting on my mentor/friend for the recommendation letter. Oh man....it's really happening!!!!

 

Next week I want to get to Welcome to Last Chance (Last Chance #1) by Cathleen Armstrong, If Ever I Would Leave You (Montana Rescue #0.5) by Susan May Warren, and Submerged (Alaskan Courage #1) by Dani Petry. The first and last book are Prime lending library reads and it is my hope I can be done with these books and cancel my Prime membership by the end of the month. As if I don't have enough series to keep track of, now I am starting new ones.

 

Happy Reading!

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review 2018-06-14 18:45
BORN A CRIME: STORIES FROM A SOUTH AFRICAN CHILDHOOD written and narrated by Trevor Noah
Born a Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood - Trevor Noah

 

BORN A CRIME: STORIES FROM A SOUTH AFRICAN CHILDHOOD is hands-down, one of the most hilarious and informative audio books EVER. Seriously, it's outstanding.

 

I admit that I stopped watching THE DAILY SHOW after Jon Stewart left. I didn't know much about Trevor Noah other than the fact that he was a comedian before coming to that television show. I know a lot more now and I've started watching TDS again.

 

I remember hearing about Apartheid, but I didn't have a clear understanding as to how it affected people. Now, I understand a little better. This is Trevor's story about growing up in South Africa, his family-specifically his walking miracle of a mother, ("Jesus is my health insurance."), his father and his stepfather. It's about family life, church, music, and so much more. It's funny and entertaining, but it's also painfully honest at times, and it's those times that bring this book home. (I have never laughed at any story that involves the name Hitler. With this book and Trevor's Hitler story? I swear to all that's holy, I almost peed my pants.)

 

As the title suggests, this story only covers Trevor's time in South Africa. I can only hope that he will write another book about how his career as a comedian began and how he came to be hosting THE DAILY SHOW. Please, Mr. Noah, please write some more!

 

The audio is the only way to go with this book. Trevor Noah's accent and delivery make his special story even better. BORN A CRIME is worth your time. (Thanks to Ctgt, Petra and to Melissa for their reviews of this book, which you can find herehere, and here, respectively. 

 

My highest recommendation!

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review 2018-04-25 02:38
Born a Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood (Audiobook)
Born a Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood - Trevor Noah

Trevor Noah narrates his own autobiography with humor and passion. Even when he's describing things as crippling as apartheid, racism, and domestic abuse, he's able to relate the events in a way that not only educates the listener about the horrible cruelty that crippled a country under the laws of apartheid but also allows the listener to laugh - or cry - with him at the absurdity of some of the situations. 

 

As an American, I know very little about apartheid, except that Nelson Mendela helped bring it to an end and that it made Jim Crow look like a Sunday brunch. Trevor Noah explains the ways that the South African government, ruled by the minority white population, overcame the majority black population, split them up and took the power from them. He's able to convey the lessons he learned growing up in this system - which made his very existence as a half-white/half-black child a crime - and how his mother found ways to get around the system time and time again. 

 

In a lot of ways, there are many things here that many can relate to - your first pet, feeling left out of the crowd, struggling to make ends meet - but the constant presence of apartheid and its aftermath turns those things on their head. His observations on life, people, the power of language and empathy, and the laws that surround us and shape us are astute and timely, even today. Maybe even especially today. 

 

I wasn't sure what I was going to get with this story, and didn't realize that Noah was that guy from the Daily Show until after I finished it, but I enjoyed this a great deal, which is a weird thing to say about a book filled with such heavy topics.

 

“Nelson Mandela once said, 'If you talk to a man in a language he understands, that goes to his head. If you talk to him in his language, that goes to his heart.' He was so right. When you make the effort to speak someone else's language, even if it's just basic phrases here and there, you are saying to them, 'I understand that you have a culture and identity that exists beyond me. I see you as a human being.”

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