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Search tags: true-stories
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review 2017-04-08 23:09
A Trip Down Memory Lane
Open Season: True Stories of the Maine Warden Service - Daren Worcester

As a young lad, I remember listening in amazement to the stories my father and his game warden friends would tell while sitting around a table playing cards.  Their exploits and adventures made me think they were like gods. Now, 50 some odd years later, Worcester has reminded me of those times. His chronicle of conservation wardens in Maine tell so many wonderful stories. The short but well written chapters tell of events that were frightening, funny and sad. Each one can be read at leisure, in any order the reader wants. The book serves as a great reminder of the men who dedicate their lives in a daily struggle to protect the fish and game of our country. A wonderful read!

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text 2017-01-16 01:49
Gunpowder Girls: The True Stories of Three Civil War Tragedies - Tanya Anderson This was a quick read, but certainly not an easy one. Ms. Anderson does a wonderful job of making the reader care about her subjects, making the tragedies of which she writes all the more heartbreaking. In addition, I learned quite a bit about the process of ammo making during the Civil War. Disclaimer: I received a free copy for review
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review 2016-12-26 22:41
#CBR8 Book 124: Where Am I Now? True Stories of Girlhood and Accidental Fame by Mara Wilson
Where Am I Now?: True Stories of Girlhood and Accidental Fame - Mara Wilson

I wasn't initially going to get this book. While I've seen Mrs. Doubtfire and Matilda, possibly the two films that Mara Wilson is most famous for, I haven't really watched any of the others she was a child star in, nor do I follow her Twitter or writing career as an adult. It just didn't seem like this would be all that interesting to me. Nonetheless, this book got a lot of positive write-ups from people with good taste, including Patrick Rothfuss and Wil Wheaton (himself a child star once upon a time) and several of my Goodreads friends. I do like an entertaining audio book, so I changed my mind and used a credit on it. Now I'm glad I did. 

 

As with a lot of celebrity autobiographies, Ms. Wilson reads the book herself, and she has a very wry and self-deprecating way of telling the stories about herself. As she reveals later in the book that one of the things she does for a living now is storytelling, it should come as no surprise that this is a well-told book. The book is an anthology of observations, many dealing with Ms. Wilson's childhood, not just as a child actress, but also dealing with her anxiety and OCD, the death of her mother and how and why she made the choice to give up acting when she became a teenager. There's an open letter to Matilda, the character she is most famous for, and there are stories about her college years and her writing as an adult. The chapter dealing with her mother's death and how it feels growing up without a mother, even though she seems to have a lovely stepmother; the one where she talks about determining the fairly severe levels of her OCD, not to mention the one where she talks about Robin Williams and learning about his death were probably the ones that affected me the most.

 

The reason this book doesn't quite get one of my highest rating is that it really is quite short. I was surprised at how quickly it was finished, and some of the stories are just not all that interesting and felt a bit like filler. This book was written before Ms. Wilson came out openly as bisexual, and as others have already pointed out in their reviews, I suspect some of the chapters would may have been written a bit differently if this was public knowledge. It's a good book, and Wilson is a witty story teller. While not on the same level as Craig Ferguson's or Amy Poehler's books, it was stil a good read.

 

Judging a book by its cover: It's a fairly simple cover, and shows Mara Wilson as she is probably most well-known and recognised. As a little girl, from her role as Matilda. I suspect most people don't know what Wilson looks like as an adult (I had to do a Google image search), so putting one of her most iconic images on the cover of a book that deals with her life as a child star, and has several chapters dealing with Matilda, it seems like good marketing strategy. I know she says in the book that she hates being called cute, but she really was.

Source: kingmagu.blogspot.no/2016/12/cbr8-book-124-where-am-i-now-true.html
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review 2016-12-26 10:35
The Darwin Awards
The Darwin Awards: 180 Bizarre True Stories of How Dumb Humans Have Met Their Maker - Wendy Northcutt

Not much I can say about this one: it's a collection of Darwin award winners (and the honourable mentions) and their stories.  It's both hilarious and possibly a sad commentary on the advancement, or lack thereof, of common sense.

 

For anyone who might not be familiar with the Darwin Awards, they are given each year for:

significantly improve the gene pool by eliminating themselves from the human race in an obviously stupid way. They are self-selected examples of the dangers inherent in a lack of common sense, and all human races, cultures, and socioeconomic groups are eligible to compete. Actual winners must meet the following criteria:

 

Reproduction
   Out of the gene pool: dead or sterile.
Excellence
   Astounding misapplication of judgment.
Self-Selection
   Cause one's own demise.
Maturity
   Capable of sound judgment. 
Veracity
   The event must be true.

 

(source: darwinawards.com/rules)

 

Always good for a chuckle!

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review 2016-12-02 04:57
Scottish Crime
Scottish Crime: True Crime Stories: True Crime Books Series - Book 1 - Roger Harrington

See this and all of my reviews at Mystereity Reviews

Scottish Crime: True Crime Stories details several heinous crimes that occurred in Scotland over the last century.

It is very short, with only a few cases highlighted, but each each case is extensively explored, with a lot of background and facts. However, it’s heavily in need of editing to clean up the grammatical errors and confusing passages. If this book was expanded to include more cases, it would easily be a 5 star book. If Scottish history is as rich in crime as the author claims, it shouldn’t be hard to make this a full length book.

Overall, I enjoyed Scottish Crime, but it wasn’t without problems. I still think it was worth the read, especially for people with an interest in true crime.

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