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text 2017-10-12 13:08
BookLikes How to: book search tips

 

Searching books isn't always a piece of cake, especially with a never-ending virtual bookshelf and a catalog with multiple editions. Jenn, to the rescue with some handy tips for all BookLikers! 

 

-- A guest post by Jenn, Murder by Death

 

The first and best way to find a title in the book database is to search by ISBN (or ASIN).  There are a couple of benefits to using ISBN for searching:  it will find the edition you have in your hand, and if it isn’t in the database, searching by ISBN/ASIN will kick off an import of the book, saving you all the work of having to either add it yourself, or asking a librarian to add it for you.

 

(Tip:  If you search by ISBN and multiple entries of the same title come up, let a librarian know by filing a book report.  That way they can merge the multiple records into one correct edition.)

 

Sometimes you don’t have the ISBN/ASIN handy, or the book is too old to have one.  Then it’s helpful to know a few tips about how to get the most out of BookLikes search.

 

Note: there are two search fields covered in today’s tips:  the BookLikes database, which is the field at the top right corner of the BookLikes pages, and the search field on your shelf page, which only searches the books you’ve shelved and has a different set of rules.

 

 

Searching the BookLikes book database

 

Generally, searching by title is very straightforward, especially for unusual titles, like The Maul and the Pear Tree, but the infinite variety of titles guarantees that some will work better than others without having to tweak how you search. 

 

Partial titles work. If they’re unusual enough.  So using The Maul and the Pear Tree, I can get away with searching The Maul and, although just searching The Maul is not enough: 

 

 

 

Articles A / An / The are optional:  UNLESS it’s a really common title.  So while The Wychford Poisoning Case and Wychford Poisoning Case will both return the book I’m looking for, if I try to search for A Shock to the System by Simon Brett, I’m better off including that A. 

 

 

 

 

Special characters:  The book database search is pretty forgiving overall (see note below) when it comes to &, apostrophes, commas, non-english alpha characters etc.  So searching for Mr. Pottermack’s Oversight will work as well as Mr Pottermacks Oversight, although the number of results returned might vary.    

 

 

 

Likewise, searching Jo Nesbø will return results for Jo Nesbo and vice versa.

 

(Note: there are some exceptions for non-english characters; when in doubt, try both.  This also holds true for the ampersand [&]; while I generally find it is interchangeable with ‘and’ there have been exceptions, so it’s always good to try both.)

 

 

When you’re getting too many results and none of them are the book you’re looking for.

 

Let’s say I’m looking for Ten by Gretchen McNeil. This is like searching ‘cats’ on google.  It’s too common a word and I’m going to get results that look like this:

 

 

 

Of course searching Ten Gretchen McNeil works, but generally the less typing, the better.  With that in mind, I tweak the search so that it says Ten Gretchen. Now I get:

 

 

Ten McNeil also works, but gives us two results. It’s always better to use the least common words when you have the choice to do so.  So if you’re trying to find a title that’s likely to return a lot of results, using part or all of the author’s name too will find your book faster.

 

 

Omnibuses are omnipresent

Because the BL database searches for all records that match the words you searched for, omnibus editions, if they exist, will appear in the results.  So searching for Murder on the Orient Express will return the single title edition as well as any omnibuses that include it as part of the title.   Most of the time the single edition title will appear at the top, but sometimes the omnibuses will overtake them and you’ll have to do a bit of scrolling.

 

 

PLEASE NOTE:  At the time of this writing, books that have been published under different titles in different countries and tied/combined together in the system can only be found by one of the titles (the ‘main’ one).  For example, Agatha Christie’s book Lord Edgware Dies was published in the US as Thirteen at Dinner.  As it’s the same book, they’re combined under Lord Edgware Dies.  This means that, at present, a search for Thirteen at Dinner only turns up omnibuses that contain that story.  This is a bug and it has been reported to BookLikes.  In the meantime, if you can’t find your book and you know of an alternate title, try searching by that title.

 

 

 

Searching your shelves

 

The search function for your shelves (the field that sits atop your shelves instead of at the top right of the page) is an entirely different beast from the book database search and can be summed up briefly:  This is an EXACT MATCH search function.  If a title has apostrophes, commas or any other special characters and you don’t include them, the search won’t find your books.

 

This means if I’m trying to find The Devil’s Novice by Ellis Peters on my shelves and I type in The Devils Novice (no apostrophe), it’s going to return zero results. 

 

How to get around this:  I either have to include all the punctuation in the title OR just search for a part of the title.  So searching Novice (or novice - it’s not case sensitive) will bring up my shelved book.  Other searches that will work include:  Devil (because it will search partial words), and Ellis Peters although these will return multiple results.

 

Note: you cannot use partial words combined with additional terms:  Devil Ellis or Devil Ellis Peters does NOT work; partial words must be used alone.

 

The best rule of thumb for searching your shelves is, unless you know the EXACT name of the book, stick to a few words of the title: Miss Peregrine instead of Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children.  The shorter the search terms (while still keeping them effective) the smaller the margin of error.

 

Still not finding your book?

  1. Is it spelled right? It’s always worth double checking, as BL doesn’t have “did you mean” functionality.  If the book has been published under an alternate title and you know it, try searching by that title instead and then looking under “other editions” on the book page.
  2. Search by ISBN/ASIN: if it’s not in the system, it will be by the time the search finishes.
  3. If there’s no ISBN/ASIN on the book, try searching by author; sometimes a record will have the wrong language setting, keeping it from appearing in the results.
  4. Add the book. If it’s still nowhere to be found, please consider taking the time to add the book to the database so that it will be there when the next reader comes looking.

 

 

Have you had a particularly challenging time trying to find a book?  If so, please share it in the comments below; sometimes a title needs some special love from the librarians (bad imports leaving languages out, etc), or someone else might have a tip to make those searches work better.

 

Happy BookLiking!

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text 2017-10-05 21:13
Share your favorite quote: 50 most powerful quotes from literature

 

Thanks to quotes readers can peek into the book just like through the keyhole. Quotes are wise, touching, inspirational, they are also powerful. A quote may become a motto, a leader's pitch, a brand. Let's appreciate the words by sharing your favorite quotes.

 

If you're curious how to find quotes on your BookLikes Dashboard, make sure you choose one of the Dashboard view on the right. Choose "Quote" view and your Dash will presents quote posts from blogs you follow.

 

 

If you enjoy sharing quotes, use the Quote post -- then your writing will be published within a special quote template.

 

 

You can also add a blockquote in your text. Simply mark the words and click the quotation mark on the top border of the editor box and the quote will receive a central placing in your writing. You can switch on/off the blockquote option for the paragraph any time

 

Your Quotes

 

If you follow BookLikes blog you've noticed the Friday Follow Friday with book bloggers interviews where readers are asked to share their favorite quotes. If you've missed the reading, click here to catch up.

 

Charles William Eliot's quote picked by Jennifer's Books

 

Neil Gaiman quote picked by Momma Says to Read

 

Quote from Coraline - Neil Gaiman  picked by Silence in the library

 

Quote fromBlue Lightning by Ann Cleeves  published on Obsession with words blog.

 

C.S. Lewis' quote published on Obsidian Blue blog

 

 

The following graphics presents 50 Most Powerful Quotes From Literature prepared by Essay Writing. And what are your top book quotes?

 

Source: essaywritingserviceuk.co.uk/blog/50-most-powerful-quotes-literature
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text 2017-09-22 00:00
BookLikes How-to: How to Edit the Book Catalog / E-mail notifications note

BookLikes is a blog platform dedicated to book lovers but it's also an open book catalog which shares author pages and book records of the already published titles, the new releases and the upcoming books. Any BookLikes' member can search the catalog, add a new book record, edit the existing one and update the author page.

 

The group of BookLikes Librarians takes care of the catalog and watches on the accuracy of the data and works really hard to keep it well organized and lucid. Today, we've asked two of them to share some core tips on editing the book records. Read on and keep on editing.

 

Thank you so much, BookLikes Librarians! Keep up the great work!

 

*

 

A guest post by Libromancer's Apprentice & Murder by Death

 

Parts of a Record

 

Cover:

Cover should match the edition/ISBN/ASIN - and that’s what we’ll check against.  Make sure you include a valid source code (or “book in hand” or “owned book”) when you are trying to change a cover:  missing/invalid sources will cause the edit to be rejected.

 

If you think your cover is one of several correct covers for an edition, please file a book report instead of a book edit, with a note that it’s an alternate cover for that edition. Include the URL to the cover you added too, please.

 

When covers do NOT need a source:

  • If you’re adding a cover to a book that has NO cover (green box)
  • You’re replacing a bad quality image with the SAME image at higher quality
  • You’re replacing a ‘cover coming soon’ placeholder

 

Covers can be .jpg, .gif or .png but must not exceed 250mb in size.

 

Title:

We want *just* the title and subtitles for books.  Series title should go in the Series Field.  As a general rule, there should be nothing in the title field within a set of parentheses.

 

For Graphic Novels we have to bend the rules a little due to their serial nature… and multiple systems of collecting issues. Please still fill out the series field as appropriate.

For comic books that have multiple different series under the exact same name (particularly superhero comics), the years of that series are used to designate the difference between the distinct runs.  So you may have “[Series Title] (YEAR-YEAR).

 

Where it gets a bit sticky is for Graphic Novels we want you to keep the series title in the title (we know!  We just told you not to do this for records)!  This is because the series title in this case is most often a very integral part of the volume title.

 

Example: The Wicked + the Divine, Vol. 1: the Faust Act

 

“The Faust Act” on it’s own is not the proper title, so we include the series.  Note, we used “Vol.” instead of “Volume” because the abbreviation is inclusive of the full word.

 

We don’t have a perfect solution for single issues of comic books yet, since they have UPCs instead of ISBNs (though, digital versions often have ASINs).  For single issues, use #[Issue Number] in the title.

 

Author:

Enter the author name, then wait - the database will search for records that match that name and return a list of three results. Choose the one that matches the book’s author. 

 

If search returns “no results” - please check the spelling of the author’s name carefully: if it is spelled correctly, hit “enter” to create a new record.  (There have been reports that this doesn’t work for non-librarians, if you find it didn’t assign the book to the proper author, flag the new book as ‘wrong author’ and note the correct name in the report.)

 

If search returns multiple results:  if your author has a name that is likely to be unique (i.e. J.K. Rowling, or Jo Nesbo), and the search returns multiple results, it’s an indication that there are author records that need to be merged.  Choose the author record at the top of the search results, and after saving the record, please flag us and let us know there are author records that need to be merged.

 

Author records should NOT have titles or qualifications:  for example:

  • Sir Arthur Conan Doyle - WRONG
  • Arthur Conan Doyle - CORRECT

 

(No Sir, Dr., Mr., Mrs., Dames, etc.)

 

  • Kathy Reichs, M.D., PhD, D.A.B.F.A. - WRONG
  • Kathy Reichs - CORRECT

 

(No MDs, PhDs or Jr., Sr, etc.)

 

If you are adding narrators, translators, etc. please be sure to label them accordingly; this will make the sort by author function on people’s shelves work a little bit more accurately.

 

What are these other roles?

  • Author: whoever wrote the work, or a significant part of the work.
  • Narrator: The performer of the work, such as in an audio book.
  • Translator: Translated the author’s writing into a different language.
  • Illustrator: an artist for the work.
  • Editor: did not write the work, but shaped it, such as the editor of an anthology.
  • Contributor: someone who added to the work in some other way, such as writing the Foreward.

 

Series:

Type in the series, and wait a second to let it try and find matches.  If it does find a match, select that series.  If it doesn’t, hit Enter/Return on your keyboard to add the Series.

 

 

Position in Series:

The system will accept whole numbers and decimals  (ex. 0.5, or 3.5).  Please do NOT include multiple series’ numbers.  If a book is part of multiple series, choose the main series, and assign it the appropriate place in that series.

 

What is a series:  multiple books with the same cast of characters, set in the same universe with a continuing or evolving progression. Progression is the key word: Sherlock Holmes is NOT a series; the stories were published without any timeline continuity.  Each story acts as a complete stand-alone and can be read in any order.  

 

What is NOT a series: Publisher imprints (Harlequin for example), that publish stand alone books, but number them within the imprints printing history.

 

There’s no ISBN/ASIN yet checkbox:

Only use this checkbox if your book is pre-1970’s or is scheduled to be published in the future, if the book is online-only, or fanfic.  In all cases, a valid source code must be included at the bottom of the edit page.

 

ISBN/ASIN:

Generally an either/or situation, with ASIN’s applying to Kindle books and Audible audiobooks.

However, there is a known bug that will sometimes mark valid ASINs as invalid, so at this time we are *not* splitting off combined ebook and Kindle editions.

 

If you need to edit a record and it doesn’t like the valid ASIN included, Librarians are recommending that non-Librarians remove the ASIN and submit the edit.  We check the record when ISBNs and ASINs are removed in an edit, and can specifically not approve that part of the edit.

 

ASINs are always a combination of letters and numbers - so if you see a string of just numerals, that can be cleared right now.  Similarly, ISBNs are only numeric (though you will see the occasional ISBN 10 ending with an “X”), so if you see something in an ISBN field that’s a mix, that needs to be fixed!  Also, an ASIN and ISBN should never be identical, if they are listed as such, one of them needs correcting!

 

Records with invalid (or missing both altogether) ISBNs/ASINs need to be merged.

 

Publisher:

Start out by typing in the publisher name, it should then generate a drop down list of options, sometimes with duplicates or odd one-off variations.  Please choose the “cleanest” version if there are duplicates (for example, a lot of them have dates after the name - avoid those if you can).

 

Librarians can’t remove or merge duplicates or one-off variations of publisher names, but we do submit them to the BookLikes staff for handling.

 

Date Published:

Date published for that edition, at least the year, more if you have it.

 

Format:

For the most part, format should be relatively straightforward, such as with a hardcover or paperback, but there are some areas, especially with digital formats, that may trip you up.

 

For digital items:

  • If your record has an ASIN choose “kindle”
  • If your record has an ISBN choose “ebook”
  • If you have a digital audio file, choose “audiobook”
  • If it’s fanfiction or a online only digital short, choose “online only”

 

Special physical formats:

  • “Library Binding” is generally a third party publisher rebinding and selling a softcover book or a collection of serial publications together with a hardcover.  One example is the company PawPrints that does this with children's books, and if you look at the page with the publication and Library of Congress information the ISBN will be different than the ISBN on the back cover barcode.
  • “MP3 CD” is a specific type of book-on-cd, where 10+ hrs of listening are on a single disc.

 

 

Description:

 

Book synopsis only please - do not include author plugs, or sale information, or series information in this field.

 

Genre:

 

This is optional, but please try to limit it to four genre tags; this may not always be possible, but it keeps the book record easy to read.   Note that if you search genres for “suspense”, books that are also “romantic suspense” will come up too, so there is no need to assign “romance” and “suspense” and “romantic suspense”  to a book.  

 

 

Duplicate Records

 

What qualifies as a Duplicate?

 

The obvious stuff:

  • Books with duplicate ISBNs
  • Books with duplicate ASINs

 

The not-so-obvious stuff:

  • Older pre-ISBN editions - do they have the same publisher and/or publish date?

 

If a record has any of the above, or lacks so much information that it is impossible to tell which physical book it’s a record of, it will get merged. Bare minimum for disambiguation is:

  • Title
  • Author
  • Publisher
  • Publish Date

 

The important thing here is that if a book has a different valid ISBN or ASIN, it is not a Duplicate, which leads us to...

 

 

New Book vs New Editions

 

If you have a book that you can find the title and author but not a record that matches on ISBN/ASIN, you can “Add New Edition” from the existing book page. This ties your book record to the other versions of the same book.

 

Sometimes a book isn’t in our system at all, and that’s when it’s time to add a New Book. Before that stage, try the search a few ways first, just in case something has changed between our initial record import and the publication in hand.  For example, sometimes authors change titles.

-Search by ISBN or ASIN

-Try altering your title search slightly to include all or a portion of the author’s name.  So if you search: The Scandal of It all and come up with nothing, try:  The Scandal of It all Jordan, OR:   The Scandal of it all Sophie.

 

 

Bad book records:  How to spot them

 

If you open a book on your shelves and think it might be a ‘bad one’ here are some things to look for:

 

Does the title have random brackets, extra words, or really really funky punctuation?

 

Does it have an author?  -  Some imports came through with corrupted author fields, leaving these records with blank or empty authors

 

When you’re looking at the book page, can you see any other books by that author listed on the right?  Does anyone else have that book shelved (also listed on the right)?  These aren’t always 100% accurate indications of a bad record, but they can often be a big indicator - if you click on your edition of Pet Cemetery and it’s not displaying any other Stephen King books, or it looks like you’re the only person on BookLikes who has read it, it’s a bad record.

 

Can you see a language?  ALL records must have a language assigned to them and you can see it in the block of information on each book page.  Like the bad author imports I mentioned above, some imports brought in records without any language assigned. These records will not appear in searches at all, and need to be corrected.

 

Is it an empty record - does it have nothing save the title and author?  For most books, that means that even if it’s not a bad record, it probably has a much better defined twin in the database somewhere, (unless you’re shelving the super-obscure titles), and should be merged properly.

 

Example:

 

*

Thank you!

 

 P.S.

E-mail notifications

 

You've probably noticed that your mail boxes have no BookLikes e-mails :( SO sorry for this silence!

 

We're experiencing some mailing issues that's why you have not received the e-mail notification for some time now. We're working to fix the problematic issues and we do hope everything will be back to normal any day now.

 

So sorry for this inconvenience! Your notifications on the service should be working fine so you can still stay up to date with the comments, likes, reblogs and discussions. Just check the notification spot next to the main menu button on the top of your Dashboard.

 

With any questions or concerns, please don't hesitate and mail Kate@booklikes.com

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text 2017-09-05 08:39
Building tables in HTML, or, how to get your spreadsheet on BookLikes

I'm using the spreadsheet I made in RL on BookLikes to track my Halloween 2017 Bingo reads and I've been asked by a couple of people how they can go about doing their own. 

 

BookLikes supports HTML tables in posts, but it's not obvious how to go about doing it.  There are basically two parts involved:  knowing where to put the table and building the table (or copy/pasting).  

 

I'm going to cover building the table - because there are a couple of different routes you can take to do that - first.  Then I'll cover where to put it, because there's only one way to do that and it applies to everybody.

 

So first: the code.  For advanced users, this is what I did:  I created my spreadsheet and converted it to HTML**, then opened that HTML up in an editor (any text editor will work) and cleaned it up (most apps put a LOT of extraneous crap in that won't work in BL).  For BookLikes you only need the table itself:  the HTML tag, head tag and body tag will only mess things up.

 

(**Excel will export to web page.  Mac users using Numbers app need a middle step: Copy the table from Numbers.  Create a new document in TextEdit and make sure Rich Text Format is turned ON. Paste the table into TextEdit - make sure it looks like the one you copied.  Save the document as an HTML page.)

 

For the person who does not want anything at all to do with the table creation:  if you are willing to PM me your email address, I'll send you the code I used and you can paste that into your post and alter it to suit your books/style.  It can also be had by doing a "view source" on my blog page and doing a copy/paste.

 

If you want to try building your own table from scratch, I'm assuming you know a bit about HTML and CSS.  Below are two screenshots: one of the beginning of my table and one of the end of it (it's stupidly too long to put in as one screenshot).  Feel free to use this as a guide to achieving the coloured rows, etc.  Some of the styles are overkill, but it was easier to leave them than it was to delete them.

 

 

[...]

 

Note:  I used a div tag to center the table in the post; span didn't work; I didn't try table align=center, ymmv

 

This post would go on forever if I explained each style, but if you are looking for a specific result, or want to know what any of them means, please ask in the comments and I'll be happy to explain further.  

 

Now once you've decided how you're going to get your table, you need to know where to put it.  On the Create new post page, in the toolbar, you want the button at the end:

 

 

When you click on that you'll get a pop up window for another text input box called Source Code.  If you've already started your post, you'll see the text and HTML code in this window.  It'll likely look messy.

 

If you've copied your table code from somewhere else, place your text cursor where you want the table to go in the post, and paste.  If you are starting from scratch, this is where you start typing. 

 

You can use this 'source code' button whenever you want to add a bit of flair, or tweak your post - I often use it to adjust the padding around my images (i.e. I want padding on the right, but not the left side of my image), or on the rare occasions when I want coloured text.  BookLikes will take a fair bit of CSS, but sometimes it's hit and miss - what it doesn't like it just deletes, so your results may vary.

 

I hope this helps and if anyone would like to just use my code as a starting point, and adjust colours and styles, please let me know via PM and I'll email it to you (PM won't take the code either, so email is about the best bet).

 

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text 2017-08-24 19:56
BookLikes How to: inserting book page links and cover thumbnail links to books on BookLikes

 

BookLikes bloggers are amazing supporters and their blogs are full of awesome resources, and tips&tricks not only for BookLikes newbies but also regular bloggers.

Please welcome Debbie in the BookLikes How to section. We're republishing her post (originally published on her blog in April 2017) with some nice tips about book links on BookLikes. Great work, Debbie!

Enjoy all!

*

 

Runaway Robot - Lester del Rey -- A guest post by Debbie from Debbie's Spurts

 

The large bookcover at left (dashboard view) you get by choosing "post" on book pages, "update and publish" on currently reading display or by pressing the large "plus" sign when creating/editing posts. 

 

If in the text of your posts you want to link to book page (like Runaway Robot - Lester del Rey ) or with book cover thumbnails like:

Runaway Robot - Lester del Rey then read on for screenshots and instructions.

 

(Of course, you can also use the URLs to the book pages to link but this method is the booklikes equivalent of goodreads' "add book/author" and LibraryThing's "touchstones".  For some odd reason, possibly just cross-posting, I keep seeing booklikes posts with  links to the book pages on other sites rather than to booklikes book pages.)

 

When creating or editing a post, you click on the plus'ed book cover to see additional options.

 

 

Pressing the photo/image icon now showing on upper left of bookcover inserts a cover thumbnail that links to booklikes page:

 

 

 

Pressing the gray chain/link icon inserts a text link to the booklikes book page:

 

 

 

Pressing the "X" leaves anything in body of your post intact but removes the big giant opening bookcover.

 

 

 

[I'm also seeing lots of posts linked to books with green-missing-image covers that also include a hand inserted image of the bookcover.  If you have the cover image available to insert manually in your posts, please consider taking the time to help your fellow readers and beef up the booklikes database by visiting the book page and clicking "add cover" underneath that empty cover:

 

 

When a missing cover gets added, the "+" cover automatically updates; the thumbnail added to body/text of your post must be reinserted.

 

Happy writing and linking!

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