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review 2018-03-22 18:45
MYSTERY WALK by Robert McCammon, narrated by Nick Sullivan
Mystery Walk - Robert McCammon,Nick Sullivan


MYSTERY WALK is a story involving the epic battle between good and evil and Robert McCammon does these types of stories better than almost anyone.


I won't get into the plot much, as this book was written back in the 80's and hundreds of other reviews already do that. I will say that this is my fourth time reading this book, (I actually listened to it, courtesy of the narrator Nick Sullivan), and this time it affected me even more than it did previously. I'm not sure why that is-perhaps as I've grown older I see more truth and depth in this tale?


It could also be the fact that the narrator brought these characters alive for me. I easily pictured the small town of Hawthorn and both its hateful and sweet residents. I vividly pictured the tent revivals of J.J. Falconer and the bogus claims of healing from his son Wayne. (I had to try hard NOT to picture Wayne's first bout with healing, you'll see what I mean if you read this.) Mr. Sullivan's voicing worked really well for me here and for this reason I've bumped my rating of 4 and 4.5 stars from my previous reads to all five.


MYSTERY WALK is full of hope but at the same time does not shy away from the difficulties in life we all face. The wonderful prose of Robert McCammon is only improved by Nick Sullivan's narration. If you're in need of a little hope in your life during these difficult times, then I highly recommend giving MYSTERY WALK a listen. If you do, give Billy Creekmore a hug from me and tell him that Char said "Hi".


You can get your copy here: Mystery Walk


*I received a free copy of this audiobook from the narrator, in exchange for my honest review. This is it!*

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review 2018-03-20 16:55
Photography Book – Walk With Me by Debra Schoenberger @RedheadWithBook @iReadBookTours
WALK WITH ME - Debra Schoenberger

Book Details:


Book Title: Walk with Me by Debra Schoenberger
Category: Adult non-fiction / Photography – 104 pages
Genre: Documentary / Street Photography / Travel
Publisher: Blurb
Release date: December 26, 2017
Tour dates: March 5 to 23, 2018
Content Rating: G




I think the title for Walk With Me by Debra Schoenberger speaks for itself, photographs taken on the fly. Expensive cameras are not required to save the moment for future enjoyment. I think most of us have a trusty cellphone with us.


I have been shooting photography for a long time and my camera has been with me longer than my Kindle, though both are now ‘a must have on me all the time’ companion.


I’m sure there is a photograph in Walk With Me that will make you smile, maybe create a frown, or provoke some heavy thinking.


I voluntarily reviewed a free copy of Walk With Me by Debra Schoenberger.


Animated Animals. Pictures, Images and Photos  4 Stars





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Source: www.fundinmental.com/photography-book-walk-with-me-by-derbra-schoenberger-redheadwithbook-ireadbooktours
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text 2018-03-16 15:00
Blanky - Kealan Patrick Burke
The Devil and the Deep - Ellen Datlow
Saga, Volume 1 - Brian K. Vaughan,Fiona Staples
Mystery Walk - Robert McCammon,Nick Sullivan


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review 2018-03-11 01:43
It's a story beautifully told, but that doesn't make me less tired of it.
Medicine Walk - Richard Wagamese,Tom Stechschulte

(I have to acknowledge that this is pretty well in the "not for me" category, but setting that aside, here we go!)


The writing is gorgeous. It's set in the BC interior in about the 1970s, and it has a fantastic sense of place and time. There are multiple layers of community and place and history, and Wagamese really draws that out. The land is evoked vividly, and sometimes brutally, and it feels like what I've known of those places on a bone-deep level.


The story is about, on a deeper level, how utterly the concept of manhood can be messed up by a lack of positive male role models. Here that story is specifically about how the colonial system worked to strip first nations boys from ever having a chance at knowing their families, let alone their ancestors and traditions, and how adrift that set generation after generation of men. That too is vividly and brutally told.


On the surface level, it's about a man who has messed up and poisoned everything he has ever touched. A hearty dose of alcohol poisoning has led him to the end of his life, and now he has one last chance to reconnect with his teenage son (who had the good fortune of being raised by someone mostly more sensible). The son agrees to go on the Road Trip of Death, to learn about his heritage, and to bury his father in what as far as they can tell is a traditional fashion (though possibly not their own cultural tradition).


Honestly, I think all of these characters would have been better off if the father had just written the kid a long letter with all the info he coughs up on the three or four days of dying in this poor kid's arms. I don't especially care for the idea that a child is morally required to give doomsday chances to their abusive parents. In my opinion, spending your life alternately neglecting your kid and taking him on terrifying drinking binges does not entitle you to emotionally blackmail said kid into comforting you on your deathbed, and I'm tired of stories that imply that. (This one was somewhat saved by the kid continuing to be angry throughout, but nevertheless!)


(There was also a secondary character who knew almost all of the really important bits of this info, but decided it was the father's place to pass it on, not his, to which I call massive amounts of bullshit.)


All of the female characters were either saintly, dead or saintly and dead, with the exception of that one prostitute (the other prostitute was saintly). They are universally cogs in the men's stories, not characters with agency and dreams of their own. I'm also pretty tired of that story. I'm curious if that's a theme in this author's books, of if the story-specific if the fixation on fatherhood/manhood drew it out.


I feel like my dad might like this book? It is gorgeously written, just not for me.

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review 2018-02-20 20:02
WALK WITH ME by Debra Schoenberger
WALK WITH ME - Debra Schoenberger

I am a huge fan of Debra Schoenberger photography books. She takes some amazing photo's. Her photos are not staged which I love the most. She just walks down a street and pops off some photo's. I love taking pictures myself and have about 70,000 on my computer. A lot of my photo's are just like hers. Something caught my eye and I took a photo of it. I am sure we all have photo's like this. 


Debra shares her photo's with all of us. Most of her books have a theme, like her book To Be a Child, is pictures of children, Her book India is sites taken in India of both people and places. This book, Walk With Me doesn't really have a theme. There are several pictures of shoes though.  I think it is one of her best books yet. The photo's are pictures of everything you can imagine, people, places, and things. Some are even out of focus. The pictures are taken from all the places she has visited. 


There is one photo in the book where she has taken a photo of a man taking a photo of a building in front of them. You can see the building through his camera lens. it is an awesome photo. There is another picture of a woman with a pigeon setting on her arm, she is taking a picture of another lady with her cell phone, and you can see the lady standing there and also through the cell phone screen. 

I absolutely loved the photo of of a broken sidewalk with a puddle of water. In the puddle you see a large buildings reflection. 


I could go on and on about the pictures in this book that spoke to me. Debra is amazing. Grab a copy of this book and see for yourself. I am sure at least one will bring a smile to your face. 


I received this book from the Author Debra Schoenberger via iRead Book Tours to read and review.

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