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review 2018-10-19 10:42
REVIEW BY MERISSA - Walk With Me (Home #7) by Cardeno C.
Walk With Me (Home Book 7) - Cardeno C.

Walk With Me is the last book in the Home series, and we finish with Eli and Seth. Eli has wanted Seth ever since he first laid eyes on him at the tender age of 11. Seth didn't have much to do with Eli then, and only really comes into frequent contact with him when he becomes an associate Rabbi, working with Eli's dad.

 

These two have an insta-love AND slow-burn romance, and it was perfect for them. I loved how Eli decided he would sooner have Seth's friendship than lose him. This is a funny book, with some absolutely hilarious weddings! Poor Seth is all I can say. Throughout all the capers and calamities that occur, Eli is there for Seth, and vice versa.

 

As I would expect from a Cardeno C. book, there were no editing or grammatical errors that disrupted my reading flow. The pacing was smooth, with a rich and detailed storyline that was backed up by fully fleshed out characters with their own quirks.

 

Sad to see this series end, but at least I can now re-read them all. Definitely recommended by me.

 

* A copy of this book was provided to me with no requirements for a review. I voluntarily read this book, and the comments here are my honest opinion. *

 

Merissa

Archaeolibrarian - I Dig Good Books!

 

Source: archaeolibrarian.wixsite.com/website/single-post/2018/09/28/Walk-With-Me-Home-7-by-Cardeno-C
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review 2018-10-05 21:49
Love One Another
Marked by Love: A Dare to Walk Away from Judgment and Hypocrisy - Gareth Stevens Publishing

“Stop telling people they need Jesus, and instead show them they matter. Stop using fear or scare tactics and start loving. Stop talking and start showing. When the people God brings into your life begin to experience a truly giving, sacrificial, unconditional, authentic, and vulnerable love from you, it will have an impact.”

Not your typical Christian nonfiction book, “Marked by Love” truly stands out in the genre. I went into this expecting to glean information about how Jesus expressed His love for us and how we, in turn, are to demonstrate that love to others, but wow, this turned out to be so much more! Many of the points that Tim Stevens articulates are anticipated, and yet he takes them further and stretches them in a way that is honest and raw and, yes, sometimes uncomfortable. An apt description for this book would be eyebrow-raising. Stevens explains that we should move past using the title of “Christians” because it has taken on such a negative connotation over the centuries and is more often than not offensive and use instead a term such as “Christ follower.” At first I was taken aback at this; however, as with so much of this book, I found that when I put aside my initial reaction and considered what Stevens was saying, I understood his point.

The best aspect of “Marked by Love” was that it was thought-provoking. It was an immersive reading experience; it didn’t just reinforce my theological views and ideas but rather challenged me to look outside the box and consider aspects of my faith and life in general in ways I hadn’t before. Stevens doesn’t purport to have all the answers, and although I didn’t always completely agree with him 100%, he expressed and explained his views logically, reaching out to the reader and drawing them in instead of just preaching to them. Many of the Scriptures used throughout the book were taken from The Message, a translation which I have not used before and which offered a new perspective on otherwise very familiar passages. Overall, I found “Marked by Love” to be radically countercultural, especially for conservative, traditionalist Christians (I should say Christ followers!), and doesn’t that also describe Jesus’ ministry during His time here on earth? Breaking down barriers and meeting people where they were with compassion, shattering hypocrisy and judgment by extending love and leaving an example for us to follow so that we can choose to be marked by love.

I received a complimentary copy of this book from Barbour Publishing and was under no obligation to post a review.

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url 2018-08-31 08:30
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review 2018-07-16 19:13
Walk a Crooked Line (Jo Larsen Book 2) - Susan McBride
 
 

Debbie Krenzer's Reviews > Walk a Crooked Line

Walk a Crooked Line by Susan McBride
Walk a Crooked Line (Jo Larsen, #2) 
by 
Susan McBride (Goodreads Author)
 
12691311
Debbie Krenzer's review 
Jul 16, 2018  ·  edit

 
really liked it
bookshelves: ebooksnet-galley-books 
 

This was my first book by what is a new author to me and it definitely did not disappoint. I will definitely be looking for more of these Jo Larsen books in the future.

This one dealt with a girl, in chapter one, jumping from a water tower. Trying to determine if this girl jumped or was she pushed? And if she was pushed, how was she pushed?

I really liked the characters in this book (not the entitled teenagers, of course) and thought that the writing was done very well. There were numerous suspects in here with a jaw dropping result. About 65% of the way through this book, it took a turn that I definitely did not see coming or was even expecting.

Excellent read for me!

Thanks to Thomas & Mercer and Net Galley for providing me with a free e-galley in exchange for an honest, unbiased review.
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review 2018-06-29 04:10
Review: The Long Walk
The Long Walk - Stephen King

I haven't quite made up my mind about Stephen King. Part of me is repelled by his trendiness; that part also recognizes an author with flaws of dialogue and resolution and an author who needs to better listen to his editor (or find a new editor). And yet the guy can craft a really riveting, well-told story, ie “The Body.” No work better displays both sides of King than The Stand, a wonderfully constructed tale that suffers woefully from diarrhea of the pen.

But I keep coming back because there is a draw. After a year or two away, something about King's works calls to me. Sometimes I'm glad I returned. Other times, I'm like “eh.” This time around, I am truly, genuinely surprised.

I wasn't expecting a whole lot out of The Long Walk. It's not one of the author's more notable works. The summary of the book brought to mind ideas of a potentially strong story, but greater likelihood of cheesiness. And knowing that King would have to maintain an entire novel of teenagers talking with one another frightened me.

But this novel really, truly worked. First, The Long Walk is believably scary. This isn't about killer clowns or murderous cars, it's about a society that encourages and delights in the sacrifice of its youth. Once a year, one hundred teenage boys begin walking. They cannot stop until there is only one left. What happens if they stop or walk too slowly? They receive a warning. After three warnings, they're killed. That's it. So simply terrifying. And the walk goes on day after day, because when your only choice is to live or to stop and rest, you find the will to keep going (or maybe you don't.)

But this isn't really a story about a dystopian society in love with the long walk, now is it? This is the story of war. Boys on the verge of manhood being sent on some ridiculous quest. They're spurred on by the words of a general shouting encouragement at them. They're cheered on by the patriotic fervor of the crowds that watch from the sideline, but never join the walk. They're shell-shocked and unsure why they'd even started walking in the first place. Published in 1979,The Long Walk likely was inspired by the war in Vietnam, but it could easily be about any war.

One of the things that almost doesn't work but ends up working spectacularly in this novel is the dialogue. Some of these conversations are so brilliant. Others are completely asinine. Who would believe that these individuals would have the conversations they do right after watching their neighbor being gunned down. But isn't that exactly how it is in war? Don't these soldiers become so immune to it all that while they may from time to time philosophize about life and death, they're just as likely to talk about Saturday morning cartoons? At times, the raging hormones of these one hundred became a bit over the top for my tastes, but largely I believed this group's actions and discussions.

The only area where I would've liked to have seen change was in the contemporary setting. King places these kids sometime in the sixties or seventies, I'm never quite sure. Again, this probably alludes to Vietnam, but it dates the story horribly. The boys discuss the music, the cars, and the babes of the era. In 2018, it makes an otherwise universal story sound a bit hokey at times. This was a problem thatThe Stand suffered from as well.

I was really pulled into this novel and I must say that while I've read relatively little of King's complete bibliography, this has been my favorite so far. There are some really wonderful passages here and the overall story is quite engaging. The Long Walk truly made me hungry for more of King's writing.
 

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