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text 2018-12-18 20:38
24 Festive Tasks: Door 18 - Winter Solstice / Yuletide, Task 1 (Bibliomancy)
The Complete Novels of Jane Austen - Jane Austen
The Complete Works (Oxford Shakespeare) - William Shakespeare,John Jowett,Gary Taylor

I was just going to do an "Ask Auntie Jane (Austen, not Marple)" ... but as BT pointed out, you can never really ask Will Shakespeare for his comment too often, so I've decided to call upon him for a second opinion.  Not that I mistrust Miss Austen of course, but these are serious questions, after all, so it seems justified to make doubly sure.

 

So, here we go:

 

  • A.   Will I read all the books on my TBR?  (page 378, line 29)

Jane Austen's response (from Pride and Prejudice):

"... their vice.  He was fond of the country and of books, and from these tastes ..."

William Shakespeare's response (from Romeo and Juliet):

"Prodigious birth of love it is to me"

Umm.  This is seriously spooky.  You guys can't possibly mean my entire TBR --  or if you do, you've both answered this one completely blindly.  So I'm going to interpret this as meaning I'll at least read all the books on any TBR I might create for a special purpose in 2019 (e.g., for my new spin on the Women Writers challenge).

 

 

B.   Will any of my 2019 reads be 5 stars? (page 227, line 31)

Jane Austen's response (from Sense and Sensibility):

"... judged it wisest, from the experience of the past, to submit -- and therefore, ..."

 

William Shakespeare's response (from Venus and Adonis):

"At this Adonis smiles as in disdain"

What?!  I'm supposedly going to finish off my TBR, but not a single book is going to be a 5-star read?  You've got to be kidding me!  That's some motivation to keep on reading ...

 
 

C.   Will I discover a new favorite book / author / series? (page 309, line 23)

Jane Austen's response (from Pride and Prejudice):

"... be soon down again and soon dining at Longbourn, and the conclusion of ..."

William Shakespeare's response (from Love's Labours Lost):

"Suscribe to your deep oaths, and keep it, too."

That sounds like another "no" from both of you -- both answers are along the lines of "stick to what you already know."  You're really not explaining very well how this "finishing off my TBR" thing is supposed to work, you know?  Again, not really a tremendous amount of motivation you're giving me ... unless you mean I'll finish off that TBR because I'll DNF a whole lot of books.  I'll have you know that I typically don't count DNFs towards a reading challenge, though ... Oh well.  Moving on:

 

 

D.   Will I discover that a major twist (hopefully, for the [even] better) has occurred in one of my favorite series? (page 459, line 16)

Jane Austen's response (from Pride and Prejudice):

"'I can easily believe it.  You thought me then devoid of every proper ..."

William Shakespeare's response (from The Merchant of Venice):

"Content, in faith.  I'll seal to such a bond"

Aha!  This makes more sense.  A new twist, especially one for the even better, is surely going to keep me reading, because I'll want to know how it ultimately plays out.  Seems now we're (finally) getting somewhere.

 

 

E.   Will I finish all of my reading challenges in 2019? (page 69, line 7)

Jane Austen's response (from Sense and Sensibility):

"... regret that they were only eight altogether."

William Shakespeare's response (from Henry VI, Part II):

"... holden at Bury the first of this next month."

Err ... and by that you mean ... what, Will?  I can see that Miss Austen thinks I'll embark on eight reading challenges (no "only" about it, though, I can assure you, Jane!) and I'll easily make mincemeat of them.  But what's the reference to Bury St. Edmunds supposed to mean, Will?  Or do you mean I'll "bury" those challenges?  It doesn't really make sense since you're clearly referencing the place and not the verb, but I think I'm just going to write this one off as one of your lesser known (and, um, I'm sorry to say, less succesful) witticisms.

 

 

F.   Will I stay within my book budget in 2019? (page 98, line 5)

Jane Austen's response (from Sense and Sensibility):

"... pleasure at seeing them in London, making the usual enquiries about their ..."

William Shakespeare's response (from Henry VI, Part III):

"And were I strong, I would not shun their fury."

Uh, oh.  I think this doesn't bode well for my book budget.  Miss Austen has me touring my usual London book haunts (which invariably ends up disastrously as far as any budgetary plans are concerned).  And Will Shakespeare thinks I'm just going to cave in to pressure ... which, I'm afraid, just may turn out a rather astute assessment, when faced with shelves and shelves of shiny, sparkling new books in a favorite store ... or on the website of an online seller.  OK, I guess I had better rethink the size of that book buying allowance ...
 
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text 2018-12-14 03:52
Frustrated

Here's something I desperately wanted to say at a meeting today but couldn't: Graphic novels =/= Porn. They're a format, just like movies and books. You can find porn graphic novels, yes, but also serious literary graphic novels, fluffy fantasy graphic novels, graphic novels appropriate for young children, etc. etc.

 

Also, the library (not mine, but it was mentioned in the discussion) that stated it would buy a collection of graphic novels by or starring women was probably able to find many, many titles that fit these requirements that weren't porn.

 

::siiiigh::

 

I may have an opportunity to get funding for our pitiful graphic novel collection, but it's been strongly indicated that the focus should be on nonfiction titles. This is why so many of our fiction graphic novels are donations from my own collection - donations don't get the same kind of scrutiny. And even then I'm very careful about what I donate, just in case.

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review 2018-12-03 21:18
Anne of Green Gables by L.M. Montgomery
Anne of Green Gables Novels #1 - L M Montgomery

This series was one of my childhood favorites, and lately, I've seen it making the blogging rounds and had a need to reread it.
I'm so glad I did!
I flew through it, yet, I savored it. It took me back to my own adolescence when my love for Green Gables first came about. I love it as much today as I did 30+ years ago.
Anne Shirley is always on the hunt for kindred spirits and yet, anyone who reads this book instantly becomes one. You look her quirky, imaginative ways. You love the unconditional love that Marilla and Matthew give her. You cry when someone important passes away in the story... at least, I do every time I read it.
You really get pulled right into Avonlea!
For those who have read it, can empathize. Those who haven't read the book... what are you waiting for? It's epic!!! And to think it was written in 1908. It doesn't feel like it though.
Yup, I'll always love this book.

 

 

Source: www.fredasvoice.com/2018/12/anne-of-green-gables-by-lucy-maud.html
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review 2018-11-19 20:00
SuperMutant Magic Academy / Jillian Tamaki
SuperMutant Magic Academy - Jillian Tamaki

The New York Times and New Yorker illustrator Jillian Tamaki is best known for co-creating the award-winning young adult graphic novels Skim and This One Summer—moody and atmospheric bestsellers. SuperMutant Magic Academy, which she has been serializing online for the past four years, paints a teenaged world filled with just as much ennui and uncertainty, but also with a sharp dose of humor and irreverence. Tamaki deftly plays superhero and high-school Hollywood tropes against what adolescence is really like: The SuperMutant Magic Academy is a prep school for mutants and witches, but their paranormal abilities take a backseat to everyday teen concerns.

 

My first thought on this is that I am wayyyy too old to truly appreciate this graphic novel! I liked the idea of a school for mutants and witches and I’m pretty sure that this would have totally been my jam when I was in junior high school. Because, let’s face it, we all feel like mutants when we’re in junior high.

It was definitely a creative way to illustrate all the problems that we have at that age: where do we fit in? What are our talents? What will be do after graduation? Or even today after school? Do our marks matter? Does that cute boy/girl know that we exist?

I can still relate to some of it—don’t we all still feel like mutants some days? But those days are fewer and farther between the older that I get. I know that I can support myself and run my life successfully on the majority of days. If I could talk to my teenage self that would be my message: you’re going to be okay. Loosen up and enjoy things more. Too bad that wisdom only comes to us once we’re short on the energy to appreciate it fully.

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review 2018-11-18 09:47
The Eustace Diamonds: "The Palliser Novels" by Anthony Trollope
The Palliser Novels (Six Volumes in 1 slipcase) - Anthony Trollope


(Original Review, 2002-06-28)


I have some fairly handsome volumes on the shelves in my living room. I mentioned elsewhere that there are about 18 Brittanica "Great Books" mostly philosophy which I have read very little of but there is also some Ancient History which I have. They are quite nice looking (faux, I guess) leather bound, but the effect is rather spoiled by them having numbers on them - I guess so the buyers can tell how many of "the great books" they possess. This does mean that they sort of shout "philistine poser!" at visitors but fortunately, I don't get many.

 

 

If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review.

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