logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: war-setting
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
review 2016-04-01 00:00
Shadows of the Last War (Eberron Campaign Setting)
Shadows of the Last War (Eberron Campaign Setting) - Keith Baker Shadows of the Last War picks up where The Forgotten Forge leaves off in the Eberron Campaign Setting. The adventurers, in the employ of the mysterious Lady Elaydren (promoted to heir d'Cannith status), must leave Sharn in a hurry to find the location of a hidden House Cannith research facility.

The adventure covers a lot of ground and the maps were a lot of fun to play through, though my players may not have agreed every time. There are a few logic gaps that I didn't notice in my read-throughs but my players found out right away. What good are you wolves, what good are you?.

Specific information on traveling in the Mournland is readily available in The Explorer's Handbook and
Five Nations, but not in the adventure itself.

The encounters were either under or overpowered. If the Emerald Claw hadn't consistently rolled badly, no one would have walked out alive. Still fun though, looking forward to the set pieces in the next adventure.

Next: Whispers of the Vampire's Blade
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2014-06-29 04:12
High on Saccharine, Needs More Swoon
Hope at Dawn - Stacy Henrie

There were other things as constant as the heavens - people’s prejudice, for one.

I suppose, any story that is set in a small rural, American town in 1918 will come across as Christian Fiction in its attempts to be historically accurate, so that bit of oversight is on me when I requested this book. Because while I find the plot interesting, I wouldn’t have read this to review had I known. Religion is a tricky thing to deal with in opinion pieces like a book review after all. That being said, it had nothing to do with how I rated this book.

Read more
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2014-02-20 03:11
Dragons are Awesome. Duh.
Code Name Verity - Elizabeth Wein

I have very mixed feelings about this book. But at the end of the day I did enjoy it.

I think I was expecting a different progression of the story, got a wee bit disappointed midway through then was adequately satisfied with how things wrapped up. Not blown away in the level I was expecting I suppose, but it did reach me someplace unnameable. I think more than anything I loved how this was a book about extraordinary women doing extraordinary things during extraordinary times. 

This is not a spoiler as you can pretty much see from the Table of Contents that the book is divided into two parts so, much like how it was with Gone Girl, you know something’s going to happen. I found the first half to be exquisite. In 1943, an EnglishScottish wireless operator is being interrogated in the Gestapo HQ in Ormaie, France. And she’s telling them everything in exchange for time. A disjointed story about two girls that sent my imagination into a tail-spin, endlessly wondering if these are memories, fabrications or foreshadowings. 

I loved how for a certain stretch, every time I finished a chapter I had to re-read it all over again under a different frame of mind and theory. The tension was delicious enough to sustain me through the obscure aircraft-speak which is probably going to be an insurmountable deterrent for some. It was tolerable early on, easy for my pedestrian, non-aeronautic brain to glaze over, but it does progressively get more complex and ingrained in the story that I can’t help but feel I’m missing something if I don’t exert the minimum effort to understand some of it in the most rudimentary level I could fathom.

It was hard, at first, to look past the gun sight sockets and camera fixing plates and rows and rows of bomb selector switches for bombs she wasn’t carrying, a Morsing key for a radio that wasn’t connected, etc.

Fly the plane, Maddie.

But it was also filled with elegant wit and humour, observations that were both clever and heart-wrenching.  manages to be harrowing without being graphic, funny without being offensive and in the process making me like both protagonists’ complexity but not outright oversimplifying the characters that are supposed to be the bad guys.

 

But it was also filled with elegant wit and humour, observations that were both clever and heart-wrenching. Verity manages to be harrowing without being graphic, funny without being offensive and in the process making me like both protagonists’ complexity but not outright oversimplifying the characters that are supposed to be the bad guys.

I do admit to being a wee bit disappointed how things turned beyond 60%. I think I was expecting something more sinister, more worthy of all that wonderful gripping tension the first half managed to dole out in every turn it took. It was like hearing a vague, atmospheric horror story that makes you imagine the worst kind of monster and being let down by the big reveal that oh, it’s a dragon. And a dragon is of course awesome, but it’s not exactly a Fifty-headed, gigantic half-siberian tiger, half-bear (begging everyone’s pardon, my imagination has gone shot after reading this I fear) that breathes fire and fires lasers through its eyes.

But then it pulls you again to another corner and takes your breath away in the very last minute. In a way I didn’t think possible after I’ve been made to abandon my siberian tiger-slash-bear of an ending.

It’s awful telling it like this, isn’t it? As though we didn’t know the ending. As though it could have another ending. It’s like watching Romeon drink poison. Every time you see it you get fooled into thinking his girlfriend might wake up and stop him. Every single time you see it you want to shout, You stupid ass, just wait a minute and she’ll open her eyes! Oi, you, you twat, open your eyes, wake up! Don’t die this time! But they always do.

 

(spoiler show)


Then you remember dragons are just as awesome.

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?