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Search tags: water-works-23
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review 2017-06-27 02:40
Ghost Talkers by Mary Robinette Kowal
Ghost Talkers - Mary Robinette Kowal

Imagine a first world war where the English have recruited mediums and devised a method to have soldiers report intelligence from their dying moments before moving on. Of course, the Germans are trying to figure out the secret of how they do this, and this is the basis for the plot of the novel. Ginger Stuyvesant is an American heiress who is one of these mediums.

 

It was a quick read and I liked it overall but I can’t say that I ever really got fully absorbed by it. Little things kept distracting me. I’m not entirely sure whether they were even problems, exactly. Just little period details that made me wonder whether things would have happened quite like that. Maybe they would have. I do think the title could have been better.

 

Anyway, I read this for the booklikes-opoly Water Works square on a gamble since that one says to “Read a book with water on the cover, or where someone turns on the waterworks (i.e., cries) because of an emotional event.” I got lucky, and there were a few instances of people crying, usually as a result of a death. This wasn’t emotional weeping but more subdued crying, the kind that you just can’t seem to help, but I think it counts.

 

At 299 pages, this nets me another $6 for my bank, leaving with a current total of $156.

 

Previous updates:

187 of 299 pages (63 %)

82 of 299 pages (27 %)

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review 2017-05-26 00:37
Queens’ Play by Dorothy Dunnett
Queens' Play - Dorothy Dunnett

Series: Lymond Chronicles #2

 

Francis Crawford goes undercover to help protect little Queen Mary from the attempts on her life disguised as accidents. Of course he does this in a completely Lymond style where he almost gets sent home his first week and he’s later suspected of doing things he didn’t do. It was a fun novel and easier to read than the first one, but it didn’t have nearly as many aha moments that made the first book so great. I also found the ending to be a bit of a downer, but I do plan on reading the rest of the series.

 

I read this for the Water Works booklikes-opoly square “Read a book with water on the cover”. At 496 pages, this nets me another $5 for my bank which brings my total balance to $92.

 

I think I’m going to do a tally at the end of how many times I landed on each square because there are a lot of repeats…

 

Previous updates:

100%

80%

53%

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review 2017-04-29 02:55
Use of Weapons by Iain M. Banks
Use of Weapons - Iain M. Banks

Series: Culture #3

 

Well that was disappointing. I was tempted to give it 3 stars overall while reading (before I got to the end) since although the present-day chapters were fairly interesting, the past chapters were duller and sometimes maudlin. Then I got to the “twist” at the end and was disappointed by it. I had caught the references to it earlier and was hoping I was wrong but… nope. If it weren’t Banks, I’d probably drop my rating lower, but I guess I’ll keep it at two stars.

 

The present-day chapters follow Cheradine Zakalwe as he’s recruited by Diziet Sma (I like her first name) to convince this old political to come out of retirement to put off a war. Zakalwe’s skill is winning wars, basically, so the “past” chapters show various scenes from his past, some of them boring and some of them brutal. These interleaved chapters make up the book. There’s also a drone called Skaffen-Amtiskaw who starts off as a bit of a jerk but becomes more interesting as the book goes along. Sma doesn’t have much of a personality, unfortunately, despite her cool name.

 

I read this for the Water Works square in booklikes-opoly since there’s water on the cover. It turns out that it’s a grounded battleship in front of a city on the cover and it seems like it was grounded in drydock in a shipyard so there would be water around it somewhere, so I think the stuff that looks like water is water. Hopefully that clears up some confusing elements of the cover (while opening a whole new can of worms as far as confusing context goes). Anyway, the book is 411 pages, so that’s another $5 for my bank, bringing my total to $48.

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