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Search tags: would-read-again
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text 2018-08-19 09:09
Reading progress update: I've read 190 out of 190 pages.
The Solitary Summer - Elizabeth von Arnim

[...] And how dreadful to meet a gardener and a wheelbarrow at every turn—which is precisely what happens to one in the perfect garden. My gardener, whose deafness is more than compensated for by the keenness of his eyesight, very soon remarked the scowl that distorted my features whenever I met one of his assistants in my favourite walks, and I never meet them now. I think he must keep them chained up to the cucumber-frames, so completely have they disappeared, and he only lets them loose when he knows I am driving, or at meals, or in bed. But is it not irritating to be sitting under your favourite tree, pencil in hand, and eyes turned skywards expectant of the spark from heaven that never falls, and then to have a man appear suddenly round the corner who immediately begins quite close to you to tear up the earth with his fangs? No one will ever know the number of what I believe are technically known as winged words that I have missed bringing down through interruptions of this kind. Indeed, as I look through these pages I see I must have missed them all, for I can find nothing anywhere with even a rudimentary approach to wings.

 

I just love her wry honesty about herself, and the image of the under-gardeners chained to the cucumber frames makes me laugh.

 

Sometimes when I am in a critical mood and need all my faith to keep me patient, I shake my head at the unshornness of the garden as gravely as the missionary shook his head at me. The bushes stretch across the paths, and, catching at me as I go by, remind me that they have not been pruned; the teeming plant life rejoices on the lawns free from all interference from men and hoes; the pinks are closely nibbled off at the beginning of each summer by selfish hares intent on their own gratification; most of the beds bear the marks of nocturnal foxes; and the squirrels spend their days wantonly biting off and flinging down the tender young shoots of the firs. Then there is the boy who drives the donkey and water-cart round the garden, and who has an altogether reprehensible habit of whisking round corners and slicing off bits of the lawn as he whisks. "But you can't alter these things, my good soul," I say to myself. "If you want to get rid of the hares and foxes, you must consent to have wire-netting, which is odious, right round your garden. And you are always saying you like weeds, so why grumble at your lawns? And it doesn't hurt you much if the squirrels do break bits off your firs—the firs must have had that happening to them years and years before you were born, yet they still flourish. As for boys, they certainly are revolting creatures. Can't you catch this one when he isn't looking and pop him in his own water-barrel and put the lid on?"

 

This perfectly sums up MT's feeling about drivers who cut corners when they turn.  I believe, given the chance and amnesty, he'd do just this to the offenders.

 

I sat by the window in my room till late, looking out at the moonlight in the quiet garden, with a feeling as though I were stuffed with sawdust—a very awful feeling—and thinking ruefully of the day that had begun so brightly and ended so dismally. What a miserable thing not to be able to be frank and say simply, "My good young man, you and I never saw each other before, probably won't see each other again, and have no interests in common. I mean you to be comfortable in my house, but I want to be comfortable too. Let us, therefore, keep out of each other's way while you are obliged to be here. Do as you like, go where you like, and order what you like, but don't expect me to waste my time sitting by your side and making small-talk. I too have to get to heaven, and have no time to lose. You won't see me again. Good-bye."

 

Thank god society has progressed at least this much; that we can in all propriety say much the same message to our guests and more often than not, have them welcome and agree with such liberating sentiments.

 

Review to follow.

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text 2018-08-19 07:46
Reading progress update: I've read 130 out of 190 pages.
The Solitary Summer - Elizabeth von Arnim

I've read through July to this point.  So far, it's the most consistently introspective section, and deals more with social questions concerning the differences in social classes, poverty, and morality.

 

The points that made me pause (for one reason or another):

 

"The idea of the June baby striding across the firmament and hurling the stars about as carelessly as though they were tennis-balls was so magnificent that it sent shivers of awe through me as I read.

 

"But if you break all your dolls," added April, turning severely to June, and eyeing the distorted remains in her hand, "I don't think lieber Gott will let you in at all. When you're big and have tiny Junes—real live Junes—I think you'll break them too, and lieber Gott doesn't love mummies what breaks their babies."

 

"But I must break my dolls," cried June, stung into indignation by what she evidently regarded as celestial injustice; "lieber Gott made me that way, so I can't help doing it, can I, mummy?"

 

On these occasions I keep my eyes fixed on my book, and put on an air of deep abstraction; and indeed, it is the only way of keeping out of theological disputes in which I am invariably worsted."

 

In Elizabeth's place, I too would feign deep abstraction if faced with this kind of logic.

 

 

"[...] something inside me had kept on saying aggressively all the morning, "Elizabeth, don't you know you are due in the village? Why don't you go then? When are you going? Don't you know you ought to go? Don't you feel you must? Elizabeth, pull yourself together and go" Strange effect of a grey sky and a cool wind! For I protest that if it had been warm and sunny my conscience would not have bothered about me at all. We had a short fight over it, in which I got all the knocks, as was evident by the immediate swelling of the bump alluded to above, and then I gave in, and by two o'clock in the afternoon was lifting the latch of the first door and asking the woman who lived behind it what she had given the family for dinner. "

 

Her conscience seems to have been reincarnated into my conscience, for this is exactly the voice I hear in my own head. 

 

 

"It is sin" he said shortly.

"Then the forgiveness is sure."

"Not if they do not seek it."

I was silent, for I wished to reply that I believed they would be forgiven in spite of themselves, that probably they were forgiven whether they sought it or not, and that you cannot limit things divine; but who can argue with a parson? These people do not seek forgiveness because it never enters their heads that they need it. The parson tells them so, it is true, but they regard him as a person bound by his profession to say that sort of thing, and are sharp enough to see that the consequences of their sin, foretold by him with such awful eloquence, never by any chance come off."

 

Truer words have never been spoken.

 

 

"Oh, the doctor—" said the mother with a shrug, "he's no use."

"You must do what he tells you, or he cannot help you."

"That last medicine he sent me all but killed me," she said, washing vigorously. "I'll never take any more of his, nor shall any child of mine."

"What medicine was it?"

She wiped her hand on her apron, and reaching across to the cupboard took out a little bottle. "I was in bed two days after it," she said, handing it to me—"as though I were dead, not knowing what was going on round me." The bottle had contained opium, and there were explicit directions written on it as to the number of drops to be taken and the length of the intervals between the taking.

"Did you do exactly what is written here?" I asked.

"I took it all at once. There wasn't much of it, and I was feeling bad."

"But then of course it nearly killed you. I wonder it didn't quite. What good is it our taking all the trouble we do to send that long distance for the doctor if you don't do as he orders?"

"I'll take no more of his medicine. If it had been any good and able to cure me, the more I took the quicker I ought to have been cured."

 

Oh.my.god.

 

 

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review 2018-08-19 03:23
Curtsies & Conspiracies by Gail Carriger (audiobook)
Curtsies & Conspiracies - Gail Carriger,Moira Quirk

Series: Finishing School #2

 

This second installment of the finishing school series is still fun. There's an extension of the first plot where we discover what the prototype was ultimately supposed to be used for, and there's lots of stuff with vampires.

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review 2018-08-19 02:52
Crazy Rich Asians
Crazy Rich Asians - Kevin Kwan
I really wanted to see this movie and decided to read the book first (and of course go see the movie!). So, this is safe to say a book review and a little bit of a movie review too. The rating is strictly for the BOOK.
The book:
Oh my, so many characters so much going on. It is not just about Nick and Rachel. Rachel's best friend Peik Lin. It's also about Astrid and her husband Michael. Astrid making a connection with someone from her past (Charlie). I thought there was just too much going on. Too many characters to keep track of. I wish the story has just focused on Nick and Rachel. Rachel's family history is also a lot more complicated.****more in the page break
It's an interesting look at location, wealth, culture. 
The movie:
I loved this and will be owning it when it is available to own. 
The movie did focus on Nick and Rachel, breaking down their trip to a period of a week or so as opposed to a whole summer. I just thought it flowed better. The HEA was also very clear. 
Ripped Bodice Bingo: Book That Is Now a Movie
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text 2018-08-18 21:23
Soul of an Octopus: [On Sale Today!]

Soul of an Octopus: A Surprising Exploration Into the Wonder of Consciousness is on daily deal for $3.95 at Audible (audiobook).

 

22609485

 

(You don't need to be a member to buy books)

 

I haven't read it yet, but a friend said:

 

"I will revisit this book again and again and I honestly just feel like I can't find adequate words to say how much I loved this book! Can I live in this book now, please?

 

My friend's full review

Her blog - Credit where credit is due!!

 

*I'm not sponsered by anything. Just spreading the love of books!

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