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The Merry Wives of Windsor - Stephen Orgel, William Shakespeare
The Merry Wives of Windsor
by: (author) (author)
2.50 20
I feel that I have spent half my career with one or another Pelican Shakespeare in my back pocket. Convenience, however, is the least important aspect of the new Pelican Shakespeare series. Here is an elegant and clear text for either the study or the rehearsal room, notes where you need them and... show more
I feel that I have spent half my career with one or another Pelican Shakespeare in my back pocket. Convenience, however, is the least important aspect of the new Pelican Shakespeare series. Here is an elegant and clear text for either the study or the rehearsal room, notes where you need them and the distinguished scholarship of the general editors, Stephen Orgel and A. R. Braunmuller who understand that these are plays for performance as well as great texts for contemplation. (Patrick Stewart) The distinguished Pelican Shakespeare series, which has sold more than four million copies, is now completely revised and repackaged. Each volume features: * Authoritative, reliable texts * High quality introductions and notes * New, more readable trade trim size * An essay on the theatrical world of Shakespeare and essays on Shakespeare's life and the selection of texts
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Format: paperback
ISBN: 9780140714647 (0140714642)
Publisher: Penguin Classics
Pages no: 160
Edition language: English
Bookstores:
Community Reviews
Bettie's Books
Bettie's Books rated it
4.0 The Merry Wives of Windsor by William Shakespeare
bookshelves: classic, amusing, autumn-2014, re-visit-2014, play-dramatisation Read from January 01, 2008 to October 14, 2014 Setting: The play is nominally set in the early 1400s, during the same period as the Henry IV plays featuring Falstaff, but there is only one brief reference to this peri...
Meandering Em's
Meandering Em's rated it
4.0 Shakespeare comedy at its best
A Shakespearean comedy that is actually funny. Falstaff thinks he is God's gift to women, especially those who are married. He writes two similar love letters to two married women who are friends. They compare notes and decide to teach Falstaff a lesson. Hilarity ensues.
Suzanne Reads
Suzanne Reads rated it
3.0 The Merry Wives of Windsor
I listened to the audio that is available here: http://youtu.be/2SUFy2q27N8 while reading along with the text. I know that a lot of this went right over my head, the puns, the word play, the joking, and etc, but I caught enough to follow the ludicrous story, and chuckled along. Hearing it, with infl...
lonesomepoint
lonesomepoint rated it
Before anything, one interested in reading The Merry Wives of Windsor for the first time might want to to note that Sir John Falstaff appears in multiple plays (none of which are related to The Merry Wives) and to note where this Falstaff play falls in their mini-chronology.Falstaff appears in Merry...
janeg
janeg rated it
A lot of things are going on in this play. Falstaff, sure, is no sympathetic character, but the constant play on his size left me a bit uneasy. The 'fat' and the 'ugly' are perhaps now one of the few groups that can be abused remorselessly (oh I forgot, the 'stupid' as well), and I do wonder what is...
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