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Zora Neale Hurston - Community Reviews back

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Words of a Bibliophile
Words of a Bibliophile rated it 3 months ago
Their Eyes Were Watching God combines poetic narration and vernacular dialogue to tell the life story of Janie Crawford, an African-American woman in 1930s Florida. It took me some time to get used to the dialect-heavy speech but once I familiarized myself with the patterns it got easier and quicker...
Merle
Merle rated it 5 months ago
In general, readers should be suspicious when a long-unpublished work by a famous author comes to light. More often than not, these mostly seem to be cash grabs by the publisher (see, for instance, Go Set a Watchman). Barracoon has some interesting content (and at least it isn't just an early draft ...
Chris' Fish Place
Chris' Fish Place rated it 1 year ago
While Hurston’s Their Eyes Were Watching God is a deeply loved masterpiece, many people do not know about her work collecting oral folklore and oral history. It is okay that we have the rediscovery/recovery of this manuscript to add to her important work in such areas.Hurston visited Cudjo Lewis sev...
Thewanderingjew
Thewanderingjew rated it 1 year ago
Barracoon: The Story of the Last "Black Cargo" Zora Neale Hurston (Author), Robin Miles (Narrator) This brief book, tells a story that has never before been published, written by Nora Neale Hurston. It summarizes the interviews she had with Cudjo Lewis, who was thought to be the oldest slave brought...
Chris Blocker
Chris Blocker rated it 1 year ago
Barracoon: The Story of the Last “Black Cargo” is immensely important because it presents a first-hand narrative of the last-known survivor of the transatlantic shipment of Africans to the Americas and because it gifts the reading world with a lost work of Zora Neale Hurston's. Barracoon is an impor...
"So it goes."
"So it goes." rated it 2 years ago
“She had an inside and an outside nowand suddenly she knew how not to mix them.” ― Zora Neale Hurston, Their Eyes Were Watching God There's a reason this is on virtually every "classic" list you can find. I could fill a hundred pages with nothing but gloriously human quotes and still not convey t...
Book Thoughts
Book Thoughts rated it 4 years ago
Wow was that a depressing book. I always have a hard time reading a narrative that has the characters speak with a thick accent. The characters in this book all speak as uneducated Southerners and while it certainly helped put me into the time period and community, it slows down my reading and reall...
TheBrainintheJar
TheBrainintheJar rated it 4 years ago
Is this novel really about Black people?Can a Black person write a novel whose novel about a character who happens to be dark-skinned, and make it about things other than the Experience of Living as an African-American? It’s pretty racist to expect every book written by a Black to be about this. The...
Reader! Reader!
Reader! Reader! rated it 5 years ago
A woman finds her own power after decades of being under others' control. How can anyone not like that plot? Janie was raised by her grandmother—who then married Janie off, at age 16, to a middle-aged man. Because she caught her kissing a "no-good" boy. And because she wanted Janie married before ...
Summer Reading Project, BookLikes Satellite
When she was young, Janie Crawford's grandmother was afraid for her. Janie was so beautiful and so unworldly that Nanny was worried she would be ruined just like her mother was. At sixteen, Janie marries a local farmer—the first of her three marriages. Their Eyes Were Watching God, by Zora Neale Hur...
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