Comments: 8
Batgrl: Bookish Hooha 7 years ago
When I was in high school I read every book like this that I could get my hands on - and now the odd thing is how much of that material is so fully researched on wikipedia. Well, with wikipedia levels of research. I now wonder how much high school me would have bothered with any library books at all when I could just read the vast sections of The Unexplained stuff on wikipedia. (I think it would probably depend on whether high school me would have access to wikipedia. Because I think I read a lot of those books in the library when I was supposed to be researching for Serious History papers.)

This is still the kind of book I'd want to read - though I do prefer authors that actually question the stories, and compare variations of the stories. The "unquestioning narrator" is something that I can't help but eyeroll a little over, mostly because I'm more interested in the story itself than a need for it to be true.
Chris' Fish Place 7 years ago
They did question which made the book very good. Taylor Jr does too.
bookaneer 7 years ago
Nice review! I've been thinking about this one..I think I'm gonna go ahead and request.
Chris' Fish Place 7 years ago
Right after I got approved, I got put on thier auto-approved list.
Degrees of Affection 7 years ago
Looks interesting! I love learning about legends and folklore.
And yes, I prefer authors that are willing to disbelieve the stories; I want to look at them more from the POV of storytelling and folk tales.
Chris' Fish Place 7 years ago
You should really try the Ghosts of Virginia series.
Degrees of Affection 7 years ago
Never heard of it. Are those the books by Taylor Jr.?
Chris' Fish Place 7 years ago
Yes. He started doing ones based on regions (say Tidewater) and then it morphed into Ghosts of Virginia. The regional ones are slightly different than the ghost series, though many of the stories are the same.