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review 2020-02-24 07:29
Ancient Iraq by Georges Roux
Ancient Iraq - Georges Roux

TITLE:   Ancient Iraq

 

AUTHOR:  Georges Roux

 

DATE PUBLISHED:  1992 [Third, updated and revised edition]

 

FORMAT:  Paperback

 

ISBN-13:  9780140125238

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DESCRIPTION:

"Newly revised and containing information from recent excavations and discovered artifacts, Ancient Iraq covers the political, cultural, and socio-economic history from Mesopotamia days of prehistory to the Christian era."

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REVIEW:

Easy to read overview of the history of ancient Mesopotamia (i.e. the land between the Tigris and Euphrates + their extended territories), but probably vastly outdated by now. Includes a map, illustrations and chronology tables, but the vast number of peculiar, multi-syllable names got confusing.

 

 

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review 2019-11-17 01:06
Walking Wounded (Uncut Stories from Iraq) by Olivier Morel and Mael
Walking Wounded: Uncut Stories from Iraq - Olivier Morel,Maël

Date Published: October 1, 2015

Format: Kindle

Source: Library

Date Read: November 3, 2019

 

Review:

A disappointing read due to the author inserting himself in the narrative and being incredible cringey while doing so. The real servicemembers were not given any background and they were jumbled together, almost in a way that the reader had to watch the documentary Morel made to understand the book. And the author is seriously afraid of his own shadow - he is just weakling and not up to the task of dealing with service members. There were two good topics brought up in this book: veteran suicide and veteran-led protest groups that were against the Iraq war (these veterans were the first ones into Iraq in early 2003). However, I don't think any reader (veteran or civilian) would get really anything out of this book.

 

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review 2019-08-20 19:16
It's Always Been You, Jessica Scott
It's Always Been You - Jessica Scott

I enjoyed this fast paced romance. I received this for free and I voluntarily chose to review it. I've given it a 4.5* rating. This is not for the under 18 readers. There is a bit of sex and violence in this. This author takes us to the backside of what happens sometimes to our military men and women and the price they pay on protecting us. Sometime their bodies can't handle what they are exposed to. Although we can't always see it, it's there none-the-less. This hits close to home, in that I have a brother who was in Dessert Storm and a whole platoon was affected by chemicals they were exposed to. His condition continues to worsen with symptons close to Lou Garrett Disease. Thank you Jessica Scott for showing the world some of what our loved ones go through.

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review 2019-06-07 14:47
Review ~ Awesome!
The Pandora Room (Ben Walker #2) - Christopher Golden

4.5

 

Book source ~ NetGalley

 

Ben Walker, employee of The National Science Foundation (lol, not really - he actually secretly works for DARPA) and survivor of the Mount Ararat incident (among others that are secret) is called in when weird shit is found at an archaeological dig in Northern Iraq. Because that’s what DARPA (The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency) does – investigates natural and unnatural phenomena in case it could be dangerous and used against the US and obtain it if at all possible. In Mosul he meets up with Kim Seong who works as an advisor and observer for the United Nations. She and Walker had survived the horror of Ararat and if they’re both at this dig, then the weird shitometer is likely about to bury the needle. Will Lady Luck shine on them again?

 

I thought my heebie jeebies had all been heebie jeebied out when I finished Ararat. Wrong! Sweet Mother of Pearl! Walker and Kim step into yet again. Archaeologist Sophie Durand has been at her dig, The Beneath Project, for months when a small room is discovered off a worship chamber inside the underground city. And off of that hidden room is another hidden room. One that should never have been found by anyone. Ever. Because man, oh man. It’s bad. Ever hear of Pandora’s Box? Yeah, that box. Only, it’s actually a jar. I mean, if it really is Pandora’s Box/Jar. Because, is it? Oh! But guess what? There’s more! When the dig is attacked by jihadists, Ben, Kim, and dig workers have to deal with bullets topside and the jar in the city underneath. You’ll have to decide which option is the worst. Because EEEEEEEEE!

 

Keep hands and feet inside the car at all times and stay strapped in until the very end because this is one wild ride! Near non-stop action, heart palpitating danger, mysterious happenings, horrifying deaths, and danger to the extreme had me gritting my teeth and leaning anxiously forward in my seat on more than one occasion. Great setting, wonderful characters (I worried so much as to who would survive), history, action, danger, and horror. It doesn’t get much better than this folks.

Source: imavoraciousreader.blogspot.com/2019/06/the-pandora-room.html
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review 2018-09-28 22:20
On Call in Hell: A Doctor's Iraq War Story by CDR. Richard Jadick
On Call in Hell: A Doctor's Iraq War Story - Thomas Hayden,Richard Jadick,Lloyd James

I needed a short break from HB, so I picked up this audiobook. CDR Jadick did two turns as a military officer; first, he started as a Marine communications officer (which came in handy later on his is career), then he left for medical school, then returned to the Navy as a DO. He went on one less than exciting deployment to Liberia before getting the chance to go with the Marines into Fallujah, Iraq in 2004. Most of the book deals with his time in Iraq, however he does spend on chapter on the less than fateful deployment to Liberia. 

 

I liked his story and was really glad I saw the war from a medical officer's POV. There was less gung-ho toxic military culture and more brotherhood and duty. It did seem that Jadick was a true believer, at least at the beginning of the war, in the purpose and justification for the Iraq War. The memoirs were published in 2007, so the war was still going on, so I wonder if he is still true to the cause or if he moved his devotion to solely his fellow Marines and sailors. He came across as a very humble man, often crediting those around him for heroics or great ideas, especially his medical corpsmen.

 

A very good read.

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