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review 2020-02-01 16:35
Clover (manga, vols. 1-4) by CLAMP, translation by Ray Yoshimoto
Clover Omnibus - CLAMP

Kazuhiko, a former government agent, is roped into doing one last job for General Ko, one of the heads of the government. She tells him he must deliver a package, which he soon learns is actually a young girl named Sue. In the first two volumes of Clover, Kazuhiko does his best to take Sue to her destination despite opposition from multiple sources. He gradually learns who Sue is, why people don't want her going free, and how she's connected to him. The third volume of Clover is a flashback to the time when Sue and a beautiful singer named Ora first met, the beginnings of Sue's desire to leave her cage. The fourth volume of Clover is yet another flashback, even further back in time, to the days when Ran escaped his own cage and met Gingetsu, a friend of Kazuhiko's.

Clover's biggest strength was that it was very beautiful. It came across like an art experiment on CLAMP's part - lots of negative space, interesting things done with panel placement and usage, etc. And since this is one of those tragic CLAMP series, there are lots of beautiful people looking sad. A few of them get to be happy for a little bit, but it fades into bittersweetness at best.

Unfortunately, this series is style over clarity. Scenes felt disjointed and didn't always transition in ways I could easily follow. The first couple volumes technically had quite a bit of action in them, but it didn't always feel like action because of the way CLAMP drew things. It was weird, and I struggled to follow everything that was going on. The end of the amusement park portion was especially confusing, and instead of giving me more of that story, volumes 3 and 4 turned out to be flashbacks. The story never returned to its present.

One thing I didn't know until after I started reading was that this series was originally intended to be longer. I don't know why it was halted, but it was, which explains why, after two volumes of flashbacks, the story just...stopped. It was immensely frustrating.

The story had song lyrics repeated frequently throughout, at least two or three different songs. I did my best to pay attention to any lyrics the first time they showed up, but I generally found them difficult to read (in a fancy font, often white text on black backgrounds). Also, song lyrics are just disjointed text to me - I can't even vaguely imagine them put to music unless I've actually heard that music before. After a while, I just skimmed any lyrics that came up, which was probably not what CLAMP was aiming for.

I was left with so many questions. On the one hand, the government acted like Clover power was a simple matter of math (a two-leaf plus a three-leaf would equal five and therefore be too powerful to oppose). On the other hand, it was clear that some Clovers' powers wouldn't be a problem not matter how many of them got together, so it really wasn't just a matter of adding up the total number of leaves. And did people like General Ko technically count as Clovers? The world-building didn't make much sense to me.

All in all, this is one of those series that I'd probably only recommend to CLAMP completists or comics creators. As much as I liked the visuals, the story itself was more difficult to follow than it needed to be and didn't have a proper ending.

Additional Comments:

Supposedly each of the different levels of Clovers got a different tattoo, but the one character who was a one-leaf Clover had a four-leaf tattoo. Was that a mistake on CLAMP's part? It confused me.

Extras:

A few pages of full-color images at the beginning of each volume in the omnibus, as well as a full-color bonus gallery.

 

Rating Note:

 

I struggled with rating this. The story is probably more 1.5 stars - it's unfinished, will likely never be finished, and is structured oddly for something that stops at the point it does. The artwork, however, is lovely, more in the 4-star range (the clarity issues make me reluctant to rate it higher).

 

(Original review posted on A Library Girl's Familiar Diversions.)

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review 2018-02-15 16:29
Forbidden Lyrics (Lightning Strikes) by Jodie Larson
Forbidden Lyrics - Jodie Larson

 

It's fitting that Ms. Larson titled Brecken and Lizzie's story Forbidden Lyrics. Their voyage is haunting, like a melody that stays firmly embedded on your heart and an ever repeated lyric that sets up residence in your mind. The best love song is the one that imprints itself on the soul. Forbidden Lyrics is right up there with the power ballads. Whether frustrated, tempted or heartbreaking, this couple knows how to make readers feel. That's a glowing recommendation for an author in my opinion.

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review 2018-02-15 00:00
Forbidden Lyrics
Forbidden Lyrics - Jodie Larson It's fitting that Ms. Larson titled Brecken and Lizzie's story Forbidden Lyrics. Their voyage is haunting, like a melody that stays firmly embedded on your heart and an ever repeated lyric that sets up residence in your mind. The best love song is the one that imprints itself on the soul. Forbidden Lyrics is right up there with the power ballads. Whether frustrated, tempted or heartbreaking, this couple knows how to make readers feel. That's a glowing recommendation for an author in my opinion.
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review 2018-01-21 17:15
Perfection
Lyrics Heart & Soul - Anne Marie Citro
Independent Reviewer for Archaeolibrarian - I Dig Good Books!
 

This was such a heartwarming, swoon worthy story! It’s bad boy meets innocent angel. It’s perfect. I LOVED the story.

 

So, I’m not going to lie, the male lead, drove me absolutely bonkers! There were many times I wanted to just smack him across the head. His attitude at the beginning was horrendous and I really wondered if he was going to be able to be helped. I was pleasantly surprised the female lead really whipped him into shape. It might have taken a while for it to happen but when it does you hear the heavens open and angels sing, haha!

 

The overall vibe of the story was absolutely heartwarming. There was negativity that was swarming the characters at times, but the goodness that comes out of the work that the male lead is forced to do will give you goosebumps. It’s like an “ahha” moment when he realizes that these are people too and they deserve to be treated as people and nothing but normal.

 

Details and descriptions were chilling at times. My heart broke for these characters and my heart sung for these characters. I had all sorts of feels during my time reading this story. It was such a well written, overall positive story, that you just can’t pass it up! I recommend grabbing a copy immediately.

 
* A copy of this book was provided to me with no requirements for a review. I voluntarily read this book, and my comments here are my honest opinion. *
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review 2016-02-29 00:00
Love All the People: Letters, Lyrics, Routines
Love All the People: Letters, Lyrics, Routines - Bill Hicks,John Lahr
So, I'm not going to finish it, I'm not going to rate and review it.

Sadly, it started very good, with a very impressive forward by John Lahr.
I liked Bill Hicks sharp and waspy humor, and I enjoyed the written performance. At the beginning. Until it started to be repetitive.
You can read his best quotes in the Wikiquote-Summery. I had read them and loved BEFORE I picked up this book.

My main problem was how this book is MADE. I can imagine that there are not many records of Bill Hicks - a talented American comedian left us too soon - and the editors put into this book EVERY SINGLE LITTLE PIECES they managed to find. But it became tiresome to read the same jokes again and again. There were too many repetitions for my liking.

Though I'm talking here only about the book.

Not about Bill Hicks, the legendary standup comedian, whose death at the age of 32 was every bit as significant as those of John Lennon and Kurt Cobain.

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