logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: memoir
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
url 2020-03-29 16:28
Meacham on leadership in a crisis
Thirteen Days: A Memoir of the Cuban Missile Crisis - Robert F. Kennedy,Arthur M. Schlesinger Jr.

This morning I read Jon Meacham's essay in the New York Times about political leadership in calamaitous times. As a work of criticism it's quite effective, as it manages to condemn the current president without mentioning his name once.

 

It's not as though we have to look to the past to find examples of how to do it right. There are plenty of officeholders today whose response to our pandemic demonstrates what it takes to manage a crisis. Even in the United States there are numerous examples of state and local leaders who are doing it right, even at times against partisan headwinds. It brings to mind Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr.'s incredibly perceptive observation about Franklin Roosevelt, which is that his outstanding quality was his first-class temperament. Our current situation is helping me to appreciate just how important a quality that is in a crisis, especially with the counter example we currently have on display.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
url 2018-09-14 12:50
2018 US National Books Award (non fiction)
One Person, No Vote: How Voter Suppression Is Destroying Our Democracy - Carol Anderson Ph.D.,Dick Durbin
The Indian World of George Washington: The First President, the First Americans, and the Birth of the Nation - Colin G. Calloway
Directorate S: The C.I.A. and America's Secret Wars in Afghanistan and Pakistan, 2001–2016 - Steve Coll
Brothers Of The Gun: A Memoir of the Syrian War - Marwan Hisham,Molly Crabapple,Molly Crabapple
American Eden: David Hosack, Botany, and Medicine in the Garden of the Early Republic - Victoria Johnson
The Tangled Tree: A Radical New History of Life - David Quammen

Noticeable books. Added and edit this post later.

 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
url 2018-08-06 18:36
New month, new free arc for prime members ("Amazon First Reads," formerly "Kindle Firsts")
I Will Never Leave You - S.M. Thayer
The Storyteller's Secret - Sejal Badani
Hotel Sacher - Alison Layland,Rodica Doehnert
Eraser - Anna Kang,Christopher Weyant
Happy Doomsday - David Sosnowski
Stray: Memoir of a Runaway - Tanya Marquardt

Per usual, all from Amazon's own publishing imprints.  

 

And not now on booklikes yet (I am in progress of adding).

Source: www.amazon.com/kindle-dbs/firstreads
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
url 2018-01-24 15:42
Best Nonfiction Books of 2017 (per overdrive for library ebooks)
Convergence: The Idea at the Heart of Science - Peter Watson
Dear Ijeawele, or A Feminist Manifesto in Fifteen Suggestions - Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America - Richard Rothstein
The Radium Girls: The Dark Story of America's Shining Women - Kate Moore
How Emotions Are Made: The Secret Life of the Brain - Lisa Feldman Barrett
Rescuing Penny Jane: One Shelter Volunteer, Countless Dogs, and the Quest to Find Them All Homes - Amy Sutherland
Dying: A Memoir - Cory Taylor
Astrophysics for People in a Hurry - Neil deGrasse Tyson
The Book That Changed America: How Darwin's Theory of Evolution Ignited a Nation - Randall Fuller
Everybody Lies: Big Data, New Data, and What the Internet Can Tell Us About Who We Really Are - Seth Stephens-Davidowitz

I just linked a few, no particular order or topic.  See the link for full list.  Lots of political ones.  And book pages have more suggested reads on them ... I think I will be going down the rabbithole of my library wishlists ...

Source: lfpl.overdrive.com/collection/109107
Like Reblog Comment
url 2017-06-23 22:20
This Child Will Be Great
This Child Will Be Great: Memoir of a Remarkable Life by Africa's First Woman President - Ellen Johnson Sirleaf

President Sirleaf is one of the Nobel Prize winning women that I challenged myself to read last October. I had first heard her name in the memoir of one of her co-winners, Leymah Gbowee, that I had reviewed here for the blog I had before this one. Because of that, I was a little familiar with the civil wars that tore Liberia apart for 14 years and the name Charles Taylor.

What I wasn't familiar with was the overall political history of Liberia, which President Sirleaf discusses throughout her memoir. Her family had been involved in politics there long before the civil wars which gave her a more overarching view of what was happening than I had listened to in Gbowee's book. A part of me wishes I had read them in the opposite order. Gbowee's book is a lot more of the every woman experience of the wars and President Sirleaf shows the reader the "bigger picture", if you will.

President Sirleaf's story starts long before the wars, though. She begins with some history, such as the relationship the US had with the founding of Liberia before moving on to more personal history. I loved the story about the man who gave the memoir it's title by looking at her as a baby and saying those words, "This child will be great." I love the doubt that follows. President Sirleaf's rise to power was slow and winding, given the political climate of her country throughout her life, but it appeared to have progressed at a relatively steady pace with what seemed like short segues into other areas. There was a lot of heartache and a lot of experience involved in that climb to power, but she persevered.

This memoir was narrated by Robin Miles, who is an amazing narrator. The link will take you to an interview she did with BookRiot. The pacing of both the book and the narration was great, it was one of the few audiobooks that I haven't felt the need to tweak the playback speed on my app. Overall, it's an important memoir to read for those of us interested in the lives of women, particularly those who have had political success or been awarded the Nobel Prize.

This was also one of those rare books that I could fit into all three of my reading challenges this year because it is by a Nobel Laureate, it satisfies Task 11 for my Read Harder challenge, and is my Letter T for Litsy A to Z.

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?