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Search tags: so-true
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review 2021-07-19 22:27
Bountiful (True North Book 4) - Sarina Bowen
3.5 stars
 
I was consumed by this story in the beginning but it did seem to loose me some further in. I like the characters. They're both good people. I guess that her being so reluctant to let him try seemed to draw out a bit too much IMO. They wanted to be together and he always came across as respectful and honest. I did enjoy the story. I do recommend it especially for those that like a sweet romance. No one is the bad guy here. It's just people figuring things out. I plan to continue the series.

 

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review 2021-04-02 12:47
Book Review - My True Love by Melissa Foster
My True Love (The Steeles at Silver Island) - Melissa Foster
This has it all! Breathtaking hotness, emotions fighting for your heart, and so much fun and laughter, you are left with a wonderful warm glowing feeling after reading it! 
 
Oh Grant, Grant, Grant!! I couldn't wait to read the story of this lonesome, grumpy man after meeting him in Tempted by Love and I couldn't have wished for a more pleasing character. He's found himself back in the close caring community of Silver Island, only this time he's come back from war as an amputee, and he wants none of the kindness that's surrounds him.  He's intense, full of pent up emotion, he feels lost with himself and his life, and has no direction to aim for, this is a whole new type of war for Grant to deal with. Only his long time friend and almost friend to lover Jules knows him better than he knows himself, as she starts her plan to soften the hardest of Grant's edges in her own unique fun loving way.
 
Jules had cancer battle when she was younger, but the story doesn't dwell on that fact. She is such a loving, caring character that lives in a cloud of happiness and is determined to sprinkle that happy magic dust wherever it is needed.  I liked how she wasn't portrayed as an annoying busy body, rather that she had a discreet way of planting a seed in to someones mind to give them that little loving push rather than making them run in the other direction.  She brought lots of fun to the pages and when she got excited she was so funny, she just blurts things out and can't even stop for a breath.
 
Melissa's writing brings this sensitive story to life for the reader, as both hero and heroine work through their problems so beautifully together. These two are the perfect match, so sweet and encouraging, and when it comes to the physical side of things OMG Melissa's writing has the images flying of the paper it's so enjoyably HOT and Grant is ALL MAN!! 
 
Surrounded by some amazing Silver Island characters who feel very familiar, they seem to deepen the story with their strong bonds, friendships, family loyalty, and love. A incredibly beautiful, beautiful story that touches your heart as you read on, it blew me away!
Source: beckvalleybooks.blogspot.com/2021/03/book-review-my-true-love-steeles-at.html
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review 2020-11-07 13:18
The Family Next Door by John Glatt
The Family Next Door - John Glatt
I borrowed this book from a coworker. I love true crime stories.
True Crime is often scarier than fictional stories. Knowing that the incident you read about actully happened to someone, it's a lot to take in. This book is no exception. The beginning was really hard for me to read. Having to 'witness' all of that abuse that occurred to these kids is horrendous. The last half of the book was easier to read. You were 'witnessing' the court proceedings where they get served justice. They should have got the death penalty if you ask me though.
Not everyone will enjoy this one for obvious reasons. Real crime can be tough to take in.
 
 
Source: www.fredasvoice.com/2020/11/the-family-next-door-by-john-glatt-56.html
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review 2020-10-26 02:31
Everything Sad Is Untrue
Everything Sad Is Untrue (a true story) - Daniel Nayeri

This is the story of Daniel; he’s not sitting beside you as you read this book but it’ll seem like he is.  Daniel is telling his classmates about Iran, exactly how he remembers it and what it was like when he left that country, because that’s important.

 

Twelve-year-old Daniel currently lives in Oklahoma with his family. Residing in Mrs. Miller’s classroom, Daniel knows about inequity and how individuals feel about Persians.  Giving his own personal story, Daniel wants his classmates to know him, to know who he is, as a person.  So, sit back and enjoy his story.  For these are his own memories, his whole personal life (his twelve years) you will be holding securely in your own two hands.

 

I adored this book, I really did.  I loved how he wrote the book; the way that I felt a part of it and how the style of writing he used, personalized the book.  The stories he wrote were interesting and they felt genuine and vivid.  When the family fled Iran with their hard, gray suitcase and his memories of his extended family, even the smallest of details, felt so important.  What a great treasure!

 

“If you want a happy ending, that depends, of course, on where you stop your story.” ….. “It’ll be alright in the end, folks.  If it’s not alright, then it’s not the end.” 

 

(Wow, I really enjoyed this and it made me stop and think, it’s so true. If you want a happy ending to whatever is happening, keep going till you get one.  If you feel you’re getting an unhappy ending, keep going, perhaps you’re not at the end and you can change things.)

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review 2020-07-01 18:01
Hidden Figures: The True Story of Four Black Women and the Space Race - Margot Lee Shetterly,Laura Freeman ,Winifred Conkling

For more reviews, check out my blog: Craft-Cycle

A great story to share with young readers. These women's journeys are inspiring and show what hard work can accomplish. While it is unfortunate that they were unrecognized for so long, it is wonderful to see their stories told in a variety of formats (picture books, adult non-fiction, film) in recent years.

Overall, the book was well done. Any of the issues I had with it pretty much stem from taking a full chapter book for adults and trying to reduce it down to a short read understandable to children. That's a big task and overall it was done well.

The illustrations were lovely. There was nice detail and I really enjoyed the space-themed/math-themed backgrounds. It was also cool to have other important figures from the time period come up in the illustrations such as Rosa Parks, Thurgood Marshall, Martin Luther King Jr., and Daisy Bates (although it might have been nice to label them somewhere since they were not explicitly mentioned in the text). These worked as a great point to branch off into discussions of the Civil Rights movements and a few important figures in African American history.

The book nicely incorporates definitions for tricky and unfamiliar works throughout the text. This is a great way to add in some extra teaching moments while still keeping the story going. There is also a glossary of terms at the end of the book.

I also thought the book did well setting the stage in describing segregation in a simple way that would be easy for children to understand. Throughout the book, it showed some of the changes made throughout time in a very simplified way. This worked well and allowed for expansion through discussion and explanation when reading with an adult.

I did find some of the narration choppy because of the time stretch and multiple women highlighted. It may have worked better to incorporate chapters for each woman instead of blurring them all together. Also, because it is so simplified, most of the women are reduced to "good at math. Really good." While this was obviously an important feature, I wish they were more developed and their other characteristics highlighted. One doesn't become NASA's first African-American supervisor or first female African-American aerospace engineer solely because one is good at math. It takes drive, passion, persuasion, persistence, bravery, determination, and a willingness to fight for what you want. I wanted more of these characteristics to come out, but again the small space dedicated to each woman didn't really allow for much elaboration.

At the end of the book are some additional resources for further information about the women. Besides the glossary, there is also a timeline of events including when each woman started and ended their work at NACA/NASA and a brief bio about each woman.

Overall, the book was well done. The short space only allowed for a very simplified version of events, but it is a great introduction to the contribution these women made as well as the history of segregation and the Civil Rights Movement.

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