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review 2020-06-09 15:53
Whispers Under Ground
Whispers Under Ground - Ben Aaronovitch

by Ben Aaronovitch

 

The stories in this series have a way of building on the established world, but always adding something new. This one nearly lost me when the nature of a peripheral character started to sound too much like it was borrowing from the teenage Paranormal Romance genre, but it recovered nicely and turned out to be one of the best in the series so far.

 

A new adventure for Peter Grant takes him underground, well, to the London Underground where tales of sewer creatures and secret tunnels always provide plenty of scope to extrapolate a good story setting. Watching this character develop along with his magical abilities is definitely one of the strengths of the series.

 

Magic, supernatural creatures and superior officers who don't want to know are all part of the job, right?

 

Anything else I can say will give spoilers, so I'll just move on to the next one in the series and simply say, this was good.

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review 2019-10-12 01:05
Whispers Under Ground (Peter Grant #3)
Whispers Under Ground - Ben Aaronovitch

I didn’t enjoy this one quite as much as the previous two. Peter’s getting on my nerves with his constant weird reactions to Lesley’s facial injuries. The only thing he’s said about it is that he feels guilty for not feeling guilty about his best friend being hurt so badly, and since he refuses to dwell on it further and find the reason for his reaction, I am running out of patience with him. It’s all told from Peter’s POV, and being stuck in the head of a character who occasionally seems allergic to introspection can be frustrating. I’m just waiting for Lesley to start dabbling in forbidden magic to find a way to heal herself (the main implied reason she wanted to learn magic in the first place), and if she goes off the deep end and becomes a villain I’m going to blame Peter for generally being a pillock about the whole thing. (While also blaming the author for going in such an unoriginal direction, of course.)

 

I thought the book fell down a little on the murder mystery end as well, meandering for chapter after chapter before Peter pulled the solution out of his ass. It was entertaining, but it didn’t feel earned. Also, whoever wrote the cover copy should have their nose booped with a smelly pool noodle. The whole possibly-entertaining-and-interesting religion vs magic conflict alluded to is non-existent.

 

(Read for Halloween Bingo Supernatural Square)

 

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text 2019-10-11 08:07
Reading progress update: I've read 181 out of 303 pages.
Whispers Under Ground - Ben Aaronovitch

I don’t remember if Peter studying to be an architect before joining the police has come up before, but now his (snarky) encyclopedic knowledge of London’s architectural history totally makes sense.

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text 2019-10-10 06:01
Reading progress update: I've read 78 out of 303 pages.
Whispers Under Ground - Ben Aaronovitch

I just came across a line in which World War II is spelled out as "World War Two" and I think my brain short-circuited a little bit.

 

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review 2019-07-13 02:52
Whispering Under Ground by Ben Aaronovitch
Whispers Under Ground - Ben Aaronovitch

AFTER you read the book, you REALLY get the title.  Whispers Under Ground starts up with young Abigail making Peter Grant take her out to look at a ghost.  Peter brings along his friend and fellow Constable Leslie May with him to be led to the train tunnels from his home neighborhood to see the ghost and watches it get run over by what they can only describe as the Hogwart's Express thus the start of our underground adventure.  Next, we get a dead American student found on the tracks of the Tube, which the murder weapon has the vestigium, or the trace imprint that magic leaves, and that brings Constable Peter May and his master of magic DCI Thomas Nightingale into the case.  We also get Constable Lesley May back into the book after her unfortunate attack in the first book.

 

The Peter Grant series a really magical, witty series about the many different magical societies in London and features a young Constable that is assigned to a magical detail as an apprentice.  Peter doesn't always get it right and having Lesley there, now also an apprentice to remind him when he's wrong brings another dynamic to this series that makes it that much better.  Also, the elusive villain from Moon Over Soho, book 2 in the series, is still making his mark.

 

I rated this 4 of 5 stars, a really good series to get into if urban fantasy is your taste.

 

Whispering Under Ground by Ben Aaronovitch,

Book 3 in the Peter May Series.

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