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Anita Diamant
In my first novel, The Red Tent, I re-imagined the culture of biblical women as close, sustaining, and strong, but I am not the least bit nostalgic for that world without antibiotics, or birth control, or the printed page. Women were restricted and vulnerable in body, mind, and spirit, a... show more



In my first novel, The Red Tent, I re-imagined the culture of biblical women as close, sustaining, and strong, but I am not the least bit nostalgic for that world without antibiotics, or birth control, or the printed page. Women were restricted and vulnerable in body, mind, and spirit, a condition that persists wherever women are not permitted to read. When I was a child, the public library on Osborne Terrace in Newark, New Jersey, was one of the first places I was allowed to walk to all by myself. I went every week, and I can still draw a map of the children's room, up a flight of stairs,where the Louisa May Alcott books were arranged to the left as you entered.Nonfiction, near the middle of the room, was loaded with biographies. I read several about Eleanor and Franklin Roosevelt, Marie Curie, Amelia Earhart, and Helen Keller, with whom I share a birthday.But by the time I was 11, the children's library was starting to feel confining,so I snuck downstairs to the adult stacks for a copy of The Good Earth. (I had overheard a grown-up conversation about the book and it sounded interesting.)The librarian at the desk glanced at the title and said I wasn't old enough for the novel and furthermore my card only entitled me to take out children's books.I defended my choice. I said my parents had given me permission, which was only half a fib since my mother and father had never denied me any book. Eventually,the librarian relented and I walked home, triumphant. I had access to the BIG LIBRARY. My world would never be the same.

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Community Reviews
Lynn Horton Books
Lynn Horton Books rated it 1 year ago
A lovely and intriguing coming-of-age story from the perspective of a Russian Jew, The Boston Girl is refreshing.What I liked: Diamant described 20th century New York beautifully. I enjoyed reading about the wonderful relationships formed between Addie and her friends and how they developed into str...
My Never Ending List
My Never Ending List rated it 2 years ago
I listened to this on audio and really enjoyed Linda Lavin. If I didn’t know better, I would have thought she was actually Addie herself. It was her voice and her mannerism as she spoke about the different subjects that were occurring in her life, that I thought many times this audio was actually a ...
Books & Chocolate
Books & Chocolate rated it 3 years ago
I'm not very familiar with the original Bible stories that The Red Tent is based on. After reading a few other reviews, it seems many who are familiar feel this was a big departure from the 'true' stories. I didn't read this for an accurate retelling of a Bible story, so I have no opinion on the acc...
Blah, Blah, Blah, Book Blog
Blah, Blah, Blah, Book Blog rated it 4 years ago
I chose this book from NetGalley because I've read a couple of Anita Diamant’s books and I really enjoyed them. I like that after reading them, I feel satisfied that I’ve read a good story and also, somehow, smarter. She has a gift for telling complicated stories in an elegant, simple manner, and th...
Angel's Book Reviews 2.0
Angel's Book Reviews 2.0 rated it 4 years ago
65. THE RED TENT, BY ANITA DIAMANTRecommended by Trisha Cook, on Goodreads. I am not very well versed in biblical knowledge, most of what I know I got by osmosis from books, movies, and other people, and that was probably a factor in my reading. The only thing I know about the famous rape of Dinah w...
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