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Aristotle
Aristotle (/ˈærɪˌstɒtəl/; Greek: Ἀριστοτέλης [aristotélɛːs], Aristotélēs; 384–322 BC) was a Greek philosopher and scientist born in the city of Stagira, Chalkidice, on the northern periphery of Classical Greece. His father, Nicomachus, died when Aristotle was a child, whereafter Proxenus of... show more



Aristotle (/ˈærɪˌstɒtəl/; Greek: Ἀριστοτέλης [aristotélɛːs], Aristotélēs; 384–322 BC) was a Greek philosopher and scientist born in the city of Stagira, Chalkidice, on the northern periphery of Classical Greece. His father, Nicomachus, died when Aristotle was a child, whereafter Proxenus of Atarneus became his guardian. At eighteen, he joined Plato's Academy in Athens and remained there until the age of thirty-seven (c. 347 BC). His writings cover many subjects – including physics, biology, zoology, metaphysics, logic, ethics, aesthetics, poetry, theater, music, rhetoric, linguistics, politics and government – and constitute the first comprehensive system of Western philosophy. Shortly after Plato died, Aristotle left Athens and, at the request of Philip of Macedon, tutored Alexander the Great starting from 343 BC. According to the Encyclopædia Britannica, "Aristotle was the first genuine scientist in history ... [and] every scientist is in his debt."Teaching Alexander the Great gave Aristotle many opportunities and an abundance of supplies. He established a library in the Lyceum which aided in the production of many of his hundreds of books. The fact that Aristotle was a pupil of Plato contributed to his former views of Platonism, but, following Plato's death, Aristotle immersed himself in empirical studies and shifted from Platonism to empiricism. He believed all peoples' concepts and all of their knowledge was ultimately based on perception. Aristotle's views on natural sciences represent the groundwork underlying many of his works.Aristotle's views on physical science profoundly shaped medieval scholarship. Their influence extended into the Renaissance and were not replaced systematically until the Enlightenment and theories such as classical mechanics. Some of Aristotle's zoological observations, such as on the hectocotyl (reproductive) arm of the octopus, were not confirmed or refuted until the 19th century. His works contain the earliest known formal study of logic, which was incorporated in the late 19th century into modern formal logic.In metaphysics, Aristotelianism profoundly influenced Judeo-Islamic philosophical and theological thought during the Middle Ages and continues to influence Christian theology, especially the scholastic tradition of the Catholic Church. Aristotle was well known among medieval Muslim intellectuals and revered as "The First Teacher" (Arabic: المعلم الأول‎).His ethics, though always influential, gained renewed interest with the modern advent of virtue ethics. All aspects of Aristotle's philosophy continue to be the object of active academic study today. Though Aristotle wrote many elegant treatises and dialogues – Cicero described his literary style as "a river of gold" – it is thought that only around a third of his original output has survived. Bio from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Photo by Copy of Lysippus (Jastrow (2006)) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons.

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Birth date: February 24, 0384
Died: June 08, 0322
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Tolle Lege!.
Tolle Lege!. rated it 1 year ago
Happiness is what we do for its own sake. Our virtues (excellence) are either moral or contemplative. Our moral virtues allow us to work with others and practice the good habits we need in order to be noble and good. The highest virtues we have are the thinking (contemplative) virtues and they ma...
Tolle Lege!.
Tolle Lege!. rated it 2 years ago
First, I want to thank LibriVox for making this book freely available in an audio edition. This is the only 3 star book where I would recommend it to everyone. My start of reading primary philosophy started with Heidegger, that led me to Hegel and then Kant. There's no doubt I should have suffere...
Edward
Edward rated it 2 years ago
IntroductionNote on the Texts and TranslationsSelect BibliographyA Chronology of AristotleOutline of the 'Poetics'--From Plato, Republic, Books 2, 3, and 10--Aristotle, Poetics--From Sir Philip Sidney, An Apology for Poetry--From P. B. Shelley, A Defence of Poetry--From D. L. Sayers, 'Aristotle on D...
Optimistic and constructive books
Optimistic and constructive books rated it 2 years ago
I read this book to understand the meaning of 'Soul', from a Western point of view, after I've read quite a few books on this subject from the East. The chapter 'De Anima' in this book does a great job in illuminating this, if one takes the patience to read through it, and if one remembers that it w...
bestwineforlast
bestwineforlast rated it 3 years ago
Interesting. Agreed with some points, disagreed with others. He seemed chauvinistic at times.
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