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Charles M. Schulz
Charles M. Schulz was born November 25, 1922 in Minneapolis. His destiny was foreshadowed when an uncle gave him, at the age of two days, the nickname Sparky (after the racehorse Spark Plug in the newspaper strip Barney Google).In his senior year in high school, his mother noticed an ad in a... show more



Charles M. Schulz was born November 25, 1922 in Minneapolis. His destiny was foreshadowed when an uncle gave him, at the age of two days, the nickname Sparky (after the racehorse Spark Plug in the newspaper strip Barney Google).In his senior year in high school, his mother noticed an ad in a local newspaper for a correspondence school, Federal Schools (later called Art Instruction Schools). Schulz passed the talent test, completed the course and began trying, unsuccessfully, to sell gag cartoons to magazines. (His first published drawing was of his dog, Spike, and appeared in a 1937 Ripley's Believe It Or Not! installment.) Between 1948 and 1950, he succeeded in selling 17 cartoons to the Saturday Evening Post—as well as, to the local St. Paul Pioneer Press, a weekly comic feature called Li'l Folks. It was run in the women's section and paid $10 a week. After writing and drawing the feature for two years, Schulz asked for a better location in the paper or for daily exposure, as well as a raise. When he was turned down on all three counts, he quit.He started submitting strips to the newspaper syndicates. In the spring of 1950, he received a letter from the United Feature Syndicate, announcing their interest in his submission, Li'l Folks. Schulz boarded a train in June for New York City; more interested in doing a strip than a panel, he also brought along the first installments of what would become Peanuts—and that was what sold. (The title, which Schulz loathed to his dying day, was imposed by the syndicate). The first Peanuts daily appeared October 2, 1950; the first Sunday, January 6, 1952.Diagnosed with cancer, Schulz retired from Peanuts at the end of 1999. He died on February 13, 2000, the day before Valentine's Day—and the day before his last strip was published—having completed 17,897 daily and Sunday strips, each and every one fully written, drawn, and lettered entirely by his own hand—an unmatched achievement in comics.

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Birth date: November 26, 1922
Died: February 12, 2000
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Community Reviews
Lora Hates Spam
Lora Hates Spam rated it 4 weeks ago
by Snoopy You know, I'm amazed I never read this whole book before. I've seen a lot of the individual cartoons in newspaper comic sections over the years, but it never occurred to me to get the collection. It was going used for a penny so how could I resist when I saw the category for a Dark and S...
A Man With An Agenda
A Man With An Agenda rated it 2 months ago
Another enjoyable couple years for the Peanuts gang. Charlie Brown gets "Eraserphagia" and "Little Leaguers Elbow", Lucy discovers Rachel Carson, Linus gets stage fright at the Christmas pageant, and Snoopy has bird problems. Many plot points for the soon-to-be-produced "Charlie Brown Christmas" spe...
A Man With An Agenda
A Man With An Agenda rated it 5 months ago
In these years Sally becomes a full-fledged character, aging in time to fret about the tyranny of being sent to Kindergarten. The biggest debut is Frieda & Faron. Growing up I had no idea who Frieda was because she had the briefest lifespan of Schulz' main characters so hardly appeared in any strips...
A Man With An Agenda
A Man With An Agenda rated it 12 months ago
In these years Schulz really gains a lot of confidence and the experimental tweaking of gags and characters begin to truly pay off. There are some great debuts in this collection, but the craftsmanship of the strips is evident even in the strips that, at first glance, could have appeared in any of h...
Url Phantomhive
Url Phantomhive rated it 1 year ago
With Peanuts, you know you're going to have a good time. While we were fans of Peanuts at home, I never read much of the comics when I was younger. Thus, I'm having a great time reading many of them for the first time. This volume focuses around Lucy, who is loud at the best of times and definitely ...
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