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Charles M. Schulz
Charles M. Schulz was born November 25, 1922 in Minneapolis. His destiny was foreshadowed when an uncle gave him, at the age of two days, the nickname Sparky (after the racehorse Spark Plug in the newspaper strip Barney Google).In his senior year in high school, his mother noticed an ad in a... show more



Charles M. Schulz was born November 25, 1922 in Minneapolis. His destiny was foreshadowed when an uncle gave him, at the age of two days, the nickname Sparky (after the racehorse Spark Plug in the newspaper strip Barney Google).In his senior year in high school, his mother noticed an ad in a local newspaper for a correspondence school, Federal Schools (later called Art Instruction Schools). Schulz passed the talent test, completed the course and began trying, unsuccessfully, to sell gag cartoons to magazines. (His first published drawing was of his dog, Spike, and appeared in a 1937 Ripley's Believe It Or Not! installment.) Between 1948 and 1950, he succeeded in selling 17 cartoons to the Saturday Evening Post—as well as, to the local St. Paul Pioneer Press, a weekly comic feature called Li'l Folks. It was run in the women's section and paid $10 a week. After writing and drawing the feature for two years, Schulz asked for a better location in the paper or for daily exposure, as well as a raise. When he was turned down on all three counts, he quit.He started submitting strips to the newspaper syndicates. In the spring of 1950, he received a letter from the United Feature Syndicate, announcing their interest in his submission, Li'l Folks. Schulz boarded a train in June for New York City; more interested in doing a strip than a panel, he also brought along the first installments of what would become Peanuts—and that was what sold. (The title, which Schulz loathed to his dying day, was imposed by the syndicate). The first Peanuts daily appeared October 2, 1950; the first Sunday, January 6, 1952.Diagnosed with cancer, Schulz retired from Peanuts at the end of 1999. He died on February 13, 2000, the day before Valentine's Day—and the day before his last strip was published—having completed 17,897 daily and Sunday strips, each and every one fully written, drawn, and lettered entirely by his own hand—an unmatched achievement in comics.

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Birth date: November 26, 1922
Died: February 12, 2000
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Community Reviews
Reading For The Heck Of It
Reading For The Heck Of It rated it 2 weeks ago
You can't go wrong with some classic Peanuts cartoons, am I right? Peanuts Vol. 9 created by Charles Schulz (and written by Jason Cooper with illustrations by Vicki Scott and Paige Braddock) is a collection of our favorite kids and their antics. (Do you recall the sound of the incomprehensible droni...
Just a book blog
Just a book blog rated it 3 months ago
If you're a fan of Snoopy and friends then you can't go wrong with this collection of comic strips. Always a fun way to pass the time!Thank you to Netgalley and Andrews McMeel Publishing for an ARC.
Just a book blog
Just a book blog rated it 12 months ago
I don't know why I was browsing Netgalley's "read now" books before I fell asleep last night, but I'm glad I did! I love Snoopy and this is the perfect way to end the year. In this one, we spend a lot of time with Sally as she crushes on her sweet babboo and with Peppermint Patty as she struggles in...
Quite the Wondering Selection
Quite the Wondering Selection rated it 2 years ago
Good grouping of comics. Never heard them talk about adults, but in this we find out their teacher's name and that Charlie's father is a barber.
Mrs. Williams' Favorite Children's Books
I love Charlie Brown books. They are instantly recognizable characters to most students, and the books are easy to read independently. It's the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown would be a good read aloud right before Halloween, or it would be a great center for reader's theatre or student recording. ...
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