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Dante Alighieri
Dante Alighieri was born in 1265 in Florence. His family, of minor nobility, was not wealthy nor especially distinguished; his mother died when he was a child, his father before 1283. At about the age of 20 he married Gemma Donati, by whom he had three children. Little is known of Dante's... show more



Dante Alighieri was born in 1265 in Florence. His family, of minor nobility, was not wealthy nor especially distinguished; his mother died when he was a child, his father before 1283. At about the age of 20 he married Gemma Donati, by whom he had three children. Little is known of Dante's formal education-it is likely to have included study with the Dominicans, the Augustinians, and the Franciscans in Florence, and at the university in Bologna. In 1295 he entered Florentine politics and in the summer of 1300 he became one of the six governing Priors of Florence. In 1301, the political situation forced Dante and his party into exile. For the rest of his life he wandered through Italy, perhaps studied at Paris, while depending for refuge on the generosity of various nobles. He continued to write and at some point late in life he took asylum in Ravenna where he completed the Divine Commedia and died, much honoured, in 1321.

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Birth date: April 27, 1265
Died: August 05, 1321
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Community Reviews
MikeDI
MikeDI rated it 2 years ago
Okay, I apologize! What was I thinking? A few illustraations would help? They did but it is still quite boring. I consider my classics experiment at an end. Too many other ENJOYABLE books out there. If I say I'm reading some old classic, feel free to start throwing tomatoes. The illustrations were q...
The better to see you, my dear
The better to see you, my dear rated it 2 years ago
Done! *cheers* (and an abrupt end it was) I confess I started to loose my enthusiasm by Purgatory, and Paradiso veritably dragged for me. Inferno is indeed the most interesting, likely because it concentrates more on describing the poetic (and in many cases gruesome) justice inflicted there. P...
SabrinaReads
SabrinaReads rated it 2 years ago
2.5 Ehhhhhhhhh
She's Reading! ♥
She's Reading! ♥ rated it 3 years ago
«Ecce Deus fortior me, qui veniens dominabitur michi.»
Julian Meynell's Books
Julian Meynell's Books rated it 5 years ago
This is a little book of poems, mostly sonnets with surrounding explanatory text. The text tells of Dante's love for Beatrice and the poems mark this evolution ending in the intention to honour her in a way no poet has done, which of course will turn out to be the Paradiso. Dante is very much bein...
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