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Dr. Seuss
“A person’s a person, no matter how small,” Theodor Seuss Geisel, a.k.a. Dr. Seuss, would say. “Children want the same things we want. To laugh, to be challenged, to be entertained and delighted.”Brilliant, playful, and always respectful of children, Dr. Seuss charmed his way into the... show more



“A person’s a person, no matter how small,” Theodor Seuss Geisel, a.k.a. Dr. Seuss, would say. “Children want the same things we want. To laugh, to be challenged, to be entertained and delighted.”Brilliant, playful, and always respectful of children, Dr. Seuss charmed his way into the consciousness of four generations of youngsters and parents. In the process, he helped millions of kids learn to read.Dr. Seuss was born Theodor Geisel in Springfield, Massachusetts, on March 2, 1904. After graduating from Dartmouth College in 1925, he went to Oxford University, intending to acquire a doctorate in literature. At Oxford, Geisel met Helen Palmer, whom he wed in 1927. Upon his return to America later that year, Geisel published cartoons and humorous articles for Judge, the leading humor magazine in America at that time. His cartoons also appeared in major magazines such as Life, Vanity Fair, and Liberty. Geisel gained national exposure when he won an advertising contract for an insecticide called Flit. He coined the phrase, “Quick, Henry, the Flit!” which became a popular expression.Geisel published his first children’s book, And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street, in 1937, after 27 publishers rejected it.Winner of the Pulitzer Prize in 1984, an Academy Award, three Emmy Awards, three Grammy Awards, and three Caldecott Honors, Geisel wrote and illustrated 44 books. While Theodor Geisel died on September 24, 1991, Dr. Seuss lives on, inspiring generations of children of all ages to explore the joys of reading.

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Birth date: March 02, 1904
Died: September 24, 1991
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Community Reviews
FatherCraneMadeMeDoIt
FatherCraneMadeMeDoIt rated it 2 weeks ago
For more reviews, check out my blog: Craft-CycleA cute mini book inspired by Dr. Seuss's Oh, The Places You'll Go. Not as good as the original, but includes some fun interactive pieces such as two slide-to-move mechanisms and a spinning mechanism that creates a very cool effect. I found a copy in th...
Ms. Morris' Classroom Library
Ms. Morris' Classroom Library rated it 1 month ago
One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish by Dr. Seuss is about the activities of such unusual animals as the Nook, Wump, Yink, Yop, Gack, and the Zeds. It is a simple rhyming book for beginning readers. Guided Reading: Level K Classroom Activities: Let students explore pattern possibilities wi...
Ms. Morris' Classroom Library
Ms. Morris' Classroom Library rated it 1 month ago
In Green Eggs and Ham by Dr. Seuss, Sam-I-Am tries to convince another Seuss character to eat green eggs and ham. This is a classic Dr. Seuss book that most children love. During Foundations Block, my CT read this book during Dr. Seuss week, and even cooked green eggs in-front of the students. Gu...
Shelby Dunn's Bookshelf
Shelby Dunn's Bookshelf rated it 1 month ago
There is nothing like a Dr. Seuss classic!! Espicaillyone that can be incorporated into so many different lessons in a classroom. It's perfect for first-time readers and Dr. Seuss fanatics alike. These books are timeless and will always be a staple in my childhood and I hope to share them with my fu...
Shelby Dunn's Bookshelf
Shelby Dunn's Bookshelf rated it 1 month ago
There is nothing like a Dr. Seuss classic! A fun story that would be excellent in a literary lesson. It could teach rhyme scheme, character development, and sight words. It also teaches children that they should try something before deciding if they do not like it. Lexile: 210 Reading Level: Pr...
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