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Elizabeth Gaskell
Elizabeth Cleghorn Gaskell was born in London in 1810, but she spent her formative years in Cheshire, Stratford-upon-Avon and the north of England. In 1832 she married the Reverend William Gaskell, who became well known as the minister of the Unitarian Chapel in Manchester’s Cross Street. As well... show more



Elizabeth Cleghorn Gaskell was born in London in 1810, but she spent her formative years in Cheshire, Stratford-upon-Avon and the north of England. In 1832 she married the Reverend William Gaskell, who became well known as the minister of the Unitarian Chapel in Manchester’s Cross Street. As well as leading a busy domestic life as minister’s wife and mother of four daughters, she worked among the poor, traveled frequently and wrote. Mary Barton (1848) was her first success.

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A Scottish-Canadian Blethering On About Books
I'm sure I'm not saying anything very original when I write that the principal virtue of Mrs. Gaskell's Life of her friend Charlotte Bronte is the immediacy, both chronological and, to a degree, personal, between the life and the writing of the life; while, on the other hand, the principal drawback ...
Portable Magic
Portable Magic rated it 11 months ago
The first part of this short novel is a sweet story about a naive young woman who all the menfolks agree is pretty but a little too brainy to make an attractive mate. After all, what man wants a wife who is better read, knows more languages, and asks business, engineering, and farming questions? Plu...
Moonlight Reader
Moonlight Reader rated it 1 year ago
This was Elizabeth Gaskell's first book, and is the second book by her which I've read. It's really two books in one - the first, concentrating on John Barton (father of the titular Mary Barton) is a screed about structural inequality and capital versus labor, and the second, a literal courtroom dra...
Words of a Bibliophile
Words of a Bibliophile rated it 2 years ago
I thought this was a solid three-star material at first but I enjoyed this little book more than I thought I would, so four stars it is. Although there are certain story lines and themes carried throughout the novel, it moves from one topic to another in each chapter in a slice-of-life manner and mi...
The better to see you, my dear
The better to see you, my dear rated it 2 years ago
How to tag this. Know this though: if you expect a romance... well, there is romance, but it's not really the meat of the story. More like a sprinkled seasoning to give the excuse, and a happy ending I guess. What this is about is industrialization, the theme for most characters was the failure ...
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