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Elizabeth Gaskell
Elizabeth Cleghorn Gaskell was born in London in 1810, but she spent her formative years in Cheshire, Stratford-upon-Avon and the north of England. In 1832 she married the Reverend William Gaskell, who became well known as the minister of the Unitarian Chapel in Manchester’s Cross Street. As well... show more



Elizabeth Cleghorn Gaskell was born in London in 1810, but she spent her formative years in Cheshire, Stratford-upon-Avon and the north of England. In 1832 she married the Reverend William Gaskell, who became well known as the minister of the Unitarian Chapel in Manchester’s Cross Street. As well as leading a busy domestic life as minister’s wife and mother of four daughters, she worked among the poor, traveled frequently and wrote. Mary Barton (1848) was her first success.

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The better to see you, my dear
The better to see you, my dear rated it 1 week ago
How to tag this. Know this though: if you expect a romance... well, there is romance, but it's not really the meat of the story. More like a sprinkled seasoning to give the excuse, and a happy ending I guess. What this is about is industrialization, the theme for most characters was the failure ...
Hol
Hol rated it 2 months ago
Quite a while ago I read the synopsis and purchased North and South from Audible. I haven’t been a great lover of fiction set in this era in the past (1800’s) and have always preferred reading to listening, so kept putting it off. I wish I hadn’t, though, because this was probably the finest reading...
Themis-Athena's Garden of Books
Themis-Athena's Garden of Books rated it 3 months ago
Facially, the story is your basic Austen setup with the sole difference apparent at first sight that the narrator is a male observer of the events (which incidentally is unusual for Gaskell, too) and [spoiler] there is no HEA -- the ending is open. [/spoiler] However, this wouldn't be Gaskell if s...
A Scottish-Canadian Blethering On About Books
"Although the ladies of Cranford know all each other's proceedings, they are exceedingly indifferent to each other's opinions ... but, somehow, good-will reigns among them to a considerable degree." That passage from the first chapter of Cranford is actually a pretty good summation of what we lear...
Dem
Dem rated it 11 months ago
Elizabeth Day’s first novel, Scissors, Paper, Stone which I really enjoyed won a Betty Trask award So I was really looking forward to her latest book and when I saw it compared to The Dinner by Herman Koch I was really excited about the read.The Party starts at the end of a story that began in publi...
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