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Eric G. Wilson
Eric G. Wilson is the Thomas H. Pritchard Professor of English at Wake Forest University, where he teaches British and American Romanticism, film and literature, and creative nonfiction. Wilson has recently turned his academic training into a major new trade title, EVERYONE LOVES A GOOD TRAIN... show more

Eric G. Wilson is the Thomas H. Pritchard Professor of English at Wake Forest University, where he teaches British and American Romanticism, film and literature, and creative nonfiction. Wilson has recently turned his academic training into a major new trade title, EVERYONE LOVES A GOOD TRAIN WRECK: WHY WE CAN'T LOOK AWAY (Farrar, Straus, and Giroux, 2012), a mixture of memoir, journalism, scholarship, and cultural analysis that explores the origins, functions, and values of morbid curiosity. The book was recommended as one of the top books of the spring of 2012 by Oprah magazine, Details magazine, and Amazon.com; and it was positively reviewed in several publications, including NPR.com, The Atlanta Journal Constitution, The Minneapolis Star Tribune, The Dallas Morning News, the New Orleans Times Picayune, The Buffalo News, Booklist, Books and Culture, and Rue Morgue. Excerpts or adaptations have been published in Salon, The Christian Century, and Psychology Today, and the book has been featured in several radio venues. Wilson also achieved success with a 2008 scholarly-trade title, called AGAINST HAPPINESS: IN PRAISE OF MELANCHOLY (Farrar, Straus, and Giroux). The book, an L.A. Times best seller, was featured on NBC's Today Show, UNC TV's Bookwatch, NPR's All Things Considered and Talk of the Nation, as well as in Newsweek, the Chicago Tribune, the L.A. Times, and the New York Times. Against Happiness was also favorably reviewed in The Wall Street Journal, Booklist, Bookforum, the Globe and Mail, the Minneapolis Star Tribune, Playboy.com, Publisher's Weekly, the Raleigh News and Observer, the Christian Century, The Missouri Review, and the European Romantic Review. Excerpts have appeared in The Longman Reader, The Chronicle of Higher Education, and the L.A. Times, and the book has been translated into French, German, Italian, Spanish, Dutch, Croatian, Korean, Chinese, and Portuguese. Wilson has also published a memoir, THE MERCY OF ETERNITY: A MEMOIR OF DEPRESSION AND GRACE (Northwestern University Press). His creative nonfiction has appeared in The Virginia Quarterly Review, the Georgia Review, and r.kv.r.y. Wilson continues to produce more traditionally scholarly works, such as his recent MY BUSINESS IS TO CREATE: BLAKE'S INFINITE WRITING (University of Iowa Press). His other academic books include THE STRANGE WORLD OF DAVID LYNCH (Continuum, 2007); SECRET CINEMA: GNOSTIC VISION IN FILM (Continuum, 2006); THE MELANCHOLY ANDROID: ON THE PSYCHOLOGY OF SACRED MACHINES (State University of New York Press, 2006); COLERIDGE'S MELANCHOLIA (University Press of Florida, 2004); THE SPIRITUAL HISTORY OF ICE (Palgrave Macmillan); ROMANTIC TURBULENCE (Palgrave Macmillan, 2000); and EMERSON'S SUBLIME SCIENCE (Palgrave Macmillan, 1999). These studies, along with his numerous articles on cinematic and literary subjects, have garnered Wilson several awards, including a fellowship at the National Humanities Center in Research Triangle Park, N.C. and the university-wide prize for excellence in research at Wake Forest University. Wilson is currently at work on two scholarly-trade titles: Keep It Fake: The Art of Being a Real Phony (under contract with Farrar, Straus, and Giroux) and How to Make a Soul: The Wisdom of John Keats.
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Peace, Love & Books
Peace, Love & Books rated it 6 years ago
A sometimes cheeky, frequently provocative and thoughtful exploration of our morbid curiosity, fascination with evil, and peculiar attraction to the dark, macabre, and gruesome in life.
Zrinka
Zrinka rated it 8 years ago
about the beauty and importance of the sad moments in our lives. loved it
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