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Euripides
Euripides (Greek: Εὐριπίδης) was a tragedian of classical Athens. He is one of the three whose plays have survived, with the other two being Aeschylus and Sophocles. Upwards of 90 plays have, at various points in history, been attributed to his pen. Of these, eighteen or nineteen have survived... show more
Euripides (Greek: Εὐριπίδης) was a tragedian of classical Athens. He is one of the three whose plays have survived, with the other two being Aeschylus and Sophocles. Upwards of 90 plays have, at various points in history, been attributed to his pen. Of these, eighteen or nineteen have survived more or less complete and there are also fragments, some substantial, of most of the other plays. More of his plays have survived intact than those of Aeschylus and Sophocles together, partly due to mere chance and partly because his popularity grew as theirs declined—he became, in the Hellenistic Age, a cornerstone of ancient literary education, along with Homer, Demosthenes and Menander.

Euripides is identified with theatrical innovations that have profoundly influenced drama down to modern times, especially in the representation of traditional, mythical heroes as ordinary people in extraordinary circumstances. This new approach led him to pioneer developments that later writers adapted to comedy, some of which are characteristic of romance. Yet he also became the most tragic of poets, focusing on the inner lives and motives of his characters in a way previously unknown. Yet, he was also the literary ancestor of comic dramatists as diverse as Menander and George Bernard Shaw.

He was also unique among the writers of ancient Athens for the sympathy he demonstrated towards all victims of society, including women. His contemporaries associated him with Socrates as a leader of a decadent intellectualism, both of them being frequently lampooned by comic poets such as Aristophanes. Whereas Socrates was eventually put on trial and executed as a corrupting influence, Euripides chose a voluntary exile.
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Birth date: September 21, 0480
Died: December 30, 0405
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Philosophical Musings of a Book Nerd
The only reason I got this volume was because it contained the one Euripidean play that I did not have: the Heraklidae (or, the Children of Heracles). Herakles, otherwise known in Latin as Hercules (which is the term we generally use) was an ancient Greek hero and demigod. He is most famous for the ...
Julian Meynell's Books
Julian Meynell's Books rated it 2 years ago
I really loved this play. I have read three plays by Eruipides so far and this is my favorite. It's also my second favorite Greek play of the dozen or more that I have read. It concerns the cult of Dionysus coming to ancient Greece. The main character in it is the God himself who is disguised as...
Julian Meynell's Books
Julian Meynell's Books rated it 2 years ago
Famous as the greatest of Euripidea plays (I have read three and I don't think it is), its certainly a striking masterpiece. The story is set after Jason has returned with the Golden Fleece and with Medea as his bride. He abandons her and her children to make a new marriage, and the story concerns...
Edward
Edward rated it 3 years ago
General Introduction & NotesNote on the Text & Further ReadingChronological TableTranslator's NotePreface to Andromache--AndromachePreface to Hecabe--HecabePreface to Suppliant Women--Suppliant WomenPreface to Electra--ElectraPreface to Trojan Women--Trojan WomenNotesBibliographyGlossary of Mytholog...
The Blogging of a Book Addict
The Blogging of a Book Addict rated it 3 years ago
"More like Meh-dea, amiright?"I am not typically a fan of ancient writings, and Medea was no exception. That said, I didn't dislike the play so much as I was rather bored by it. I was also rather annoyed at the depiction of Medea as an insane monster (even though I knew it was coming): but hell hath...
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