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Frederick Douglass
Frederick Douglass (born Frederick Augustus Washington Bailey, c. February 1818 – February 20, 1895) was an African-American social reformer, abolitionist, orator, writer, and statesman. After escaping from slavery in Maryland, he became a national leader of the abolitionist movement from... show more



Frederick Douglass (born Frederick Augustus Washington Bailey, c. February 1818 – February 20, 1895) was an African-American social reformer, abolitionist, orator, writer, and statesman. After escaping from slavery in Maryland, he became a national leader of the abolitionist movement from Massachusetts and New York, gaining note for his dazzling oratory and incisive antislavery writings. He stood as a living counter-example to slaveholders' arguments that slaves lacked the intellectual capacity to function as independent American citizens. Even many Northerners at the time found it hard to believe that such a great orator had once been a slave.Douglass wrote several autobiographies. He described his experiences as a slave in his 1845 autobiography, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave, which became a bestseller, and was influential in promoting the cause of abolition, as was his second book, My Bondage and My Freedom (1855). After the Civil War, Douglass remained an active campaigner against slavery and wrote his last autobiography, Life and Times of Frederick Douglass. First published in 1881 and revised in 1892, three years before his death, it covered events during and after the Civil War. Douglass also actively supported women's suffrage, and held several public offices. Without his approval, Douglass became the first African American nominated for Vice President of the United States as the running mate and Vice Presidential nominee of Victoria Woodhull, on the Equal Rights Party ticket.A firm believer in the equality of all peoples, whether black, female, Native American, or recent immigrant, Douglass famously said, "I would unite with anybody to do right and with nobody to do wrong." Bio from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Photo by George Kendall Warren [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons.

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Birth date: February 14, 1818
Died: February 20, 1895
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Worlds Inside Books
Worlds Inside Books rated it 2 years ago
2,5 stars.I only read this book because it was part of a mandatory reading list for a class. I have never read any autobiographies, so I don't know if the way this book was written is the norm in this genre. I found it a bit dull and very monotone. Maybe I'm too used to reading fiction (very graphic...
Lindsay's Book Log
Lindsay's Book Log rated it 4 years ago
So apparently this is the week that in trying to finish my popsugar reading challenge for the year I'm reading books on race. This book is a really interesting insight into Fredrick Douglass' life. The appendix on this book and the discussion of Christianity as following Christ's teaching verses the...
TheBookofJules
TheBookofJules rated it 5 years ago
Frederick Douglass was born into slavery. With a slave owning father - who was presumably his first master - and a slave mother, all Douglass ever knew was slavery. However, even though he was a slave, he knew he was being denied his basic human rights without anyone telling him: "The white children...
The Symmetrical Bookworm
The Symmetrical Bookworm rated it 6 years ago
So, in history right now I am learning about the pre-Civil War (the Era of Reform) and the Civil War. And Frederick Douglass was mentioned in my textbook. The chapter he was mentioned in is actually really interesting, so I might just check this out. If I can find time. We shall see....
Lisa (Harmony)
Lisa (Harmony) rated it 6 years ago
This is a great book, by a great American. Skeptics looking at that statement might think, well sure you think that reading his own account. Except I've found autobiographies unintentionally revealing in fascinating ways. Within the last year I read autobiographies and memoirs by Ghandi, Dian Fossey...
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