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Hugo Hamilton
Hugo Hamilton (born Johannes Ó Húrmoltaigh) is an Irish journalist and writer. His first three novels were set in Central Europe. Then came Headbanger (1996), a darkly comic crime novel set in Dublin and featuring detective Pat Coyne. A sequel, Sad Bastard, followed in 1998. Following a year... show more
Hugo Hamilton (born Johannes Ó Húrmoltaigh) is an Irish journalist and writer. His first three novels were set in Central Europe. Then came Headbanger (1996), a darkly comic crime novel set in Dublin and featuring detective Pat Coyne. A sequel, Sad Bastard, followed in 1998.

Following a year spent in Berlin on a cultural scholarship, he completed his memoir of childhood, The Speckled People (2003), which went on to achieve widespread international acclaim. Telling the story through the eyes of his childhood self, it painfully evoked the struggle to make sense of a bizarre adult world. It also deals extensively with issues of identity, language and ethnicity, sparked by the fact that Hamilton's father was a militant nationalist who insisted that his children should speak only German (their mother's native tongue) or Irish, but not English, a prohibition the young Hugo resisted inwardly. "The prohibition against English made me see that language as a challenge. Even as a child I spoke to the walls in English and secretly rehearsed dialogue I heard outside," he later wrote in the essay Speaking to the Walls in English, published on Powells.com. As a consequence of this, Hamilton grew up with three languages – English, Irish and German – and a sense of never really belonging to any: "There were no other children like me, no ethnic groups that I could attach myself to".

In 1992 he was awarded the Rooney Prize for Irish Literature. Sang impur, the French translation of The Speckled People, won the Prix Femina Etranger in 2004 and Il cane che abbaiava alle onde, the Italian translation of the memoir, won the Premio Giuseppe Berto in 2004.
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Birth date: January 01, 1953
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The Way She Reads
The Way She Reads rated it 9 years ago
I rated this book 3.5 stars.In this memoir Hugo Hamilton tells the story of his youth. Born in Dublin in the 1950’s with a German mother and an Irish, nationalistic, father his upbringing was anything but conventional. Because of his father’s strong and uncompromising views on being Irish and resurr...
Bettie's Books
Bettie's Books rated it 10 years ago
When you are small you know nothingWritten with vocabulary and style representative of young memories and it just doesn't give me any reading pleasure. Too many good books beckoning. Next!
Bettie's Books
Bettie's Books rated it 12 years ago
There are many, many one liners in this to rock yer chops but after a while the lack of a story that you can keep a tabs on begins to gall. I am sure that I would have loved this to death earlier in my life but have had to discard it for something/anything else.Chapter One is by Roddy Doyle - "I thi...
Themis-Athena's Garden of Books
Themis-Athena's Garden of Books rated it 13 years ago
Well, of course he is; in fact, has been for some 60 years now. But that's not the point. The point is, or at least seems to be, that "Yeats Is Dead!" is the unpublished last work of the doyen of Irish literature himself, James Joyce. Or is it? Or are the 600 pages of undecipherable scribble that ar...
Themis-Athena's Garden of Books
Themis-Athena's Garden of Books rated it 13 years ago
It's not exactly Dublin's first address, the old Finbar's Hotel on Victoria Quay, overlooking the River Liffey and opposite the palazzo structure of Heuston (erstwhile Kingsbridge) Railway Station – but it's a place with both character and history: It has survived a fire, among its guests over the y...
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