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John Crowley
John Crowley was born in the appropriately liminal town of Presque Isle, Maine, in 1942, his father then an officer in the US Army Air Corps. He grew up in Vermont, northeastern Kentucky and (for the longest stretch) Indiana, where he went to high school and college. He moved to New York City... show more

John Crowley was born in the appropriately liminal town of Presque Isle, Maine, in 1942, his father then an officer in the US Army Air Corps. He grew up in Vermont, northeastern Kentucky and (for the longest stretch) Indiana, where he went to high school and college. He moved to New York City after college to make movies, and did find work in documentary films, an occupation he still pursues. He published his first novel (The Deep) in 1975, and his 14th volume of fiction (Lord Byron's Novel: The Evening Land) in 2005. Since 1993 he has taught creative writing at Yale University. In 1992 he received the Award in Literature from the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters. He finds it more gratifying that almost all his work is still in print.
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Birth date: December 01, 1942
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Community Reviews
HowardG
HowardG rated it 2 months ago
Another masterpiece from Crowley. Leisurely mythmaker recounts the life and times of Dar Oakley, a crow who learns to talk to humans, journey's to the afterlife for his lost love, defeats violent death, crosses the sea like a tern, and survives the end of modernity. Quite beautiful prose.
Chris' Fish Place
Chris' Fish Place rated it 3 years ago
I think I would have enjoyed this much better if I had been alive at the time of the Cuban Missile Crisis. I wasn't. In some ways, it is a good coming of age story. If you lived through the time period of the novel, you should enjoy it.
E.J. Stevens
E.J. Stevens rated it 3 years ago
This anthology is worth reading for Jim Butcher's Curses, Ellen Kushner's Duke of Riverside, Patricia Briggs' Fairy Gifts, and Melissa Marr's Guns for the Dead. Naked City: Tales of Urban Fantasy begins strong with a Dresden Files short story, but readers should be forewarned that many of the shor...
moving under skies
moving under skies rated it 3 years ago
I kept wishing this book were more like Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell so badly that it severely disabled my ability to enjoy what I was reading or even observe it in any objective sense. An okay novel that is damaged, I think, by its "fable" tone--the characters seemed unknowable, inconsequential. ...
Bry's Bountiful Book Blog
Bry's Bountiful Book Blog rated it 4 years ago
This book took me a really long time to read. That statement alone would probably turn a lot of people away from reading the book, and that's most likely for the best. It's not a book meant for everyone (if there really is such a thing). A gorgeous, dense and allusive novel that is surely fantasy ...
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