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Mark Millar
Along with Brian Michael Bendis, Mark Millar has been one of the key writers for Marvel Comics in the 21st century. After proving himself in the '90s as a talent to watch while writing for DC Comics and the UK comic 2000AD, his arrival to Marvel came at a time when Ultimate Spider-Man had just... show more

Along with Brian Michael Bendis, Mark Millar has been one of the key writers for Marvel Comics in the 21st century. After proving himself in the '90s as a talent to watch while writing for DC Comics and the UK comic 2000AD, his arrival to Marvel came at a time when Ultimate Spider-Man had just shot up the sales charts. It was in this environment that Millar made his first major contribution to Marvel with Ultimate X-Men, as Millar integrated forty years' worth of X-Men history, characters and lore into a solid two-year run, making the companion title to Ultimate Spider-Man every bit the creative and commercial success. Next up was The Ultimates, a new rendering of the Avengers that was to continue building on the success of the Ultimate line. He and artist Bryan Hitch pulled it all off in spades: The Ultimates and its sequel, Ultimates 2, were ensconced at the top of the sales charts every month; what's more, they were critical successes, as well. Meanwhile, Millar was invited to enter the regular Marvel Universe to take a stab at two of its most iconic characters: Spider-Man and Wolverine. Paired with industry heavyweights to draw his stories -- Terry Dodson on Marvel Knights Spider-Man and John Romita Jr. on Wolverine -- Millar brought the same fast-paced and cleverly constructed plots with which his Ultimate fans were already familiar. Amid building a small library of Millarworld indie comic books -- including the titles Chosen and Wanted, the latter of which was turned into a Hollywood blockbuster starring Angelina Jolie -- he managed to write Civil War, the epic seven-issue miniseries that definitively reshaped the landscape of Marvel's heroes. Kick-A**, a Marvel Icon project done in tandem with John Romita Jr., made an impressive impact on the sales chart before also being adapted for a major motion picture. In addition, Millar has reunited with Civil War artist Steve McNiven in both the pages of Wolverine and their creator-owned book Nemesis.
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Birth date: December 24, 1969
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Community Reviews
drallapaul
drallapaul rated it 8 months ago
This comic collection, reissued and amended, tells us about Wesley, leading a humdrum and unhappy existence, until he is taken into hand by the Fraternity and trained to be a killer supervillain. Adapted and changed completely into a film with Angelina Jolie and James McAvoy, the series is nicely pl...
Elaine White's Life in Books
Elaine White's Life in Books rated it 1 year ago
Wow! Visually and in plot, this one packs a punch right off the bat. It's slightly similar to the start of the movie - which was what made me want to read this - but with a twist. Mark Hamill!!!!I really enjoyed how different this was to the movie and I'm eager to read more.
drallapaul
drallapaul rated it 1 year ago
Having already seen the film, I knew what to expect from this comic collection. From a creative team like Millar and Gibbons, this series tells us about a young man recruited into the British Secret Service, what he has to go through to make the grade and various steps in his development. There’s un...
drallapaul
drallapaul rated it 2 years ago
You can't really go wrong with the combination of Mark Millar and Greg Capullo and this comic collection reflects their ability. It's about Bonnie, dying of old age and transported to a mythical land where those who were "good" in life are at war with those who were "bad". (Sounds like Trump languag...
XOX
XOX rated it 2 years ago
Very dark comics. Logan already living as a farmer who has a family, keeping his head down, and not care of fighting anymore. He need to get money, which he did. But they killed his family anyway. Wolverine core value, for being an old cynical man, is that he don't want to care for anyone bec...
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