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Matthew Kressel
Matthew Kressel is the author of KING OF SHARDS and the forthcoming QUEEN OF STATIC. He is a multiple Nebula Award finalist World Fantasy Award finalist.His short stories have appeared in such publications as Lightspeed, Nightmare, Clarkesworld Magazine, io9.com, Beneath Ceaseless Skies,... show more



Matthew Kressel is the author of KING OF SHARDS and the forthcoming QUEEN OF STATIC. He is a multiple Nebula Award finalist World Fantasy Award finalist.His short stories have appeared in such publications as Lightspeed, Nightmare, Clarkesworld Magazine, io9.com, Beneath Ceaseless Skies, Interzone, Electric Velocipede, Apex Magazine, and the anthologies Naked City, After,The People of the Book, and The Mammoth Book of Steampunk, and many other markets. His stories have been translated into five languages.His story "The Meeker and the All-Seeing Eye" was a 2014 Nebula Award finalist for Best Short Story. And his story "The Sounds of Old Earth" was a 2013 Nebula Award finalist for Best Short Story. In 2011 Matthew was nominated for World Fantasy Award in the category of Special Award, Non-Professional for his work editing Sybil's Garage.He started the speculative fiction magazine Sybil's Garage in 2003, and the stories and poetry therein have received multiple honorable mentions in the Year's Best Fantasy & Horror. Under the banner of Senses Five Press, Matthew published Paper Cities, An Anthology of Urban Fantasy, which won the 2009 World Fantasy Award for Best Anthology.Matthew co-hosts the Fantastic Fiction reading series at the famous KGB Bar alongside veteran speculative-fiction editor Ellen Datlow. The monthly series highlights luminaries and up-and-comers in speculative fiction.Matthew has been a long-time member of Altered Fluid, a Manhattan-based writing group. He is also obsessed with the film Blade Runner.When he's not writing, Matthew designs websites, which he has done for Stanford University, Columbia University, the magazines Weird Tales, Fantasy, and Beneath Ceaseless Skies, writers Genevieve Valentine, Nicholas Kaufmann, Chris Willrich, and many others. He has coded applications and websites for ADP, Alliance Bernstein, Vyve Broadband, and Nikon, among others. Matthew is represented by Michael Harriot of Folio Literary Management. Follow him on Twitter at @mattkressel. His website is www.matthewkressel.net.

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Community Reviews
Irresponsible Reader
Irresponsible Reader rated it 1 year ago
The publisher also released a soundtrack to go with the book today if you want to read what I thought of it, click here. --- Heller insists in his Afterword that this is not a collection of Cyberpunk stories, and who am I to doubt him? Although it feels pretty punk to ignore the Editor/The Man. It s...
E.J. Stevens
E.J. Stevens rated it 3 years ago
This anthology is worth reading for Jim Butcher's Curses, Ellen Kushner's Duke of Riverside, Patricia Briggs' Fairy Gifts, and Melissa Marr's Guns for the Dead. Naked City: Tales of Urban Fantasy begins strong with a Dresden Files short story, but readers should be forewarned that many of the shor...
wealhtheow
wealhtheow rated it 5 years ago
A mixed bag of urban fantasy stories, not all of which are actually fantasy, and not all of which are really all that urban. A number are magical realism, and if I liked that genre better (or at all) I would have enjoyed this collection better. My favorite stories were Delia Sherman's "How the Poo...
Dan Guajars
Dan Guajars rated it 5 years ago
En realidad de doy 3.5 estrellas. Es una buena colección, tiene buen material, y también tiene bastante relleno.Algunas obras son... o sea... WOW! De verdad, hay material fascinante aquí, verdadera fantasía urbana en el amplio rango de probabilidades. Y las obras de relleno son, y perdón por el leve...
Stop Making Sense
Stop Making Sense rated it 5 years ago
This book has 3 big things going for it:1. They're young adult postapocalyptic, which is rare.2. All of the stories take place only *after* the disaster has occurred--it doesn't really matter how it happened (or even what happened). 3. There's a preponderance of female authors, for once. As with all...
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