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Nessa Carey
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Nessa Carey has a virology PhD from the University of Edinburgh and is a former Senior Lecturer in Molecular Biology at Imperial College, London. She has worked in the biotech and pharmaceutical industry for ten years. She lives in Bedfordshire and this is her... show more

Here's the official version...<br/>Nessa Carey has a virology PhD from the University of Edinburgh and is a former Senior Lecturer in Molecular Biology at Imperial College, London. She has worked in the biotech and pharmaceutical industry for ten years. She lives in Bedfordshire and this is her first book.<br/><br/>And what else?<br/>After leaving school I went to the University of Edinburgh to become a vet. This didn't last because I was allergic to fur, unable to think in 3D (not good for anatomy), quite bored and really rubbish at the course. So I dropped out and at Catford Job Centre, in amongst the ads for short order chefs (I couldn't cook) and van drivers (I couldn't drive), was one for a forensic scientist. And oddly enough I had always wanted to work at this end of crime - I must have been the only kid in the UK who had read a biography of Bernard Spilsbury by the age of 11.<br/>So for five years I worked at the Metropolitan Police Forensic Science Lab in London and studied part-time. I then realised that I loved academic science and went off to do a PhD. At the University of Edinburgh. In the veterinary faculty.<br/>After that, it was the academic route of post-doc, Lecturer and Senior Lecturer. But I had a tendency to wander off on routes that intrigued me - degree in Immunology, PhD in Virology, post-doc in Human Genetics, academic position in Molecular Biology. Such wandering isn't necessarily the best idea in academia but the breadth of experience is really valued in industry. I've spent 10 years in biotech and have recently moved to the pharmaceutical sector.<br/>And outside of work? I love birdwatching (no, I don't have a life-list), cycling, scavenging stuff from skips, and growing vegetables. I have a fantasy about one day having a smallholding (where I will starve to death if I really have to be self-sufficient) and I can't wait to write my next book. And I can now cook. And drive.
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Elentarri's Book Blog
Elentarri's Book Blog rated it 1 year ago
TITLE: Hacking the Code of Life: How Gene Editing Will Rewrite Our Futures AUTHOR: Nessa Carey DATE PUBLISHED: 2019 FORMAT: Paperback ISBN-13: 9781785784972 ______________________________ DESCRIPTION: "Just 45 years ago, the age of gene modification was born. Researchers could create glo...
Arbie's Unoriginally Titled Book Blog
Carey follows up her book on epigenetics (essentially the effects of parts of DNA that aren't the base-pairs that make up genes) with another that looks at the 98% of your DNA that doesn't code for proteins, generally referred to as "junk" because it was believed it had no biological function. Thi...
Elentarri's Book Blog
Elentarri's Book Blog rated it 6 years ago
Junk DNA: A Journey Through the Dark Matter of the Genome discusses the uses and functions of the 98% of DNA that doesn't code for a specific protein (i.e. "Junk DNA"). The topics covered in this book include retrogenes, DNA/RNA repeats, protein sequences, non-protein coding RNAs, telomeres, enhan...
Arbie's Unoriginally Titled Book Blog
DNA --> mRNA --> proteins --> you understand life! Well, it was never that simple but now it's not even an accurate description of all the functions of DNA. Genes exist in binary "off or on" states. Wrong! Many genes effectively have dimmer switches that allow a continuous spectrum of activation fro...
Burston's Science Book Blog
Burston's Science Book Blog rated it 6 years ago
DNA --> mRNA --> proteins --> you understand life! Well, it was never that simple but now it's not even an accurate description of all the functions of DNA. Genes exist in binary "off or on" states. Wrong! Many genes effectively have dimmer switches that allow a continuous spectrum of activation fro...
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