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Patrick Ness
As a childI was born on an army base called Fort Belvoir, near Alexandria, Virginia, in the United States. My father was a drill sergeant in the US Army, but much nicer than that makes him seem. I only stayed at Fort Belvoir for the first four months of my life and have never even been back to... show more



As a childI was born on an army base called Fort Belvoir, near Alexandria, Virginia, in the United States. My father was a drill sergeant in the US Army, but much nicer than that makes him seem. I only stayed at Fort Belvoir for the first four months of my life and have never even been back to the East Coast of America. We moved to Hawaii, where I lived until I was almost six. I went to kindergarten there, and we used to have field trips down to Waikiki Beach. I once picked up a living sea urchin and got about a hundred needle pricks in the palm of my hand. I made up stories all the time as a kid, though I was usually too embarrassed to show them to anybody.As an adultI've only ever really wanted to be a writer. I studied English Literature at the University of Southern California, and when I graduated, I got a job as a corporate writer at a cable company in Los Angeles, writing manuals and speeches and once even an advertisement for the Gilroy, California Garlic Festival. I got my first story published in Genre magazine in 1997 and was working on my first novel, The Crash of Hennington, when I moved to London in 1999. I've lived here ever since. I taught Creative Writing at Oxford University for three years, usually to students older than I was.As an artistSo far, I've published two books for adults, a novel called The Crash of Hennington and a short story collection called Topics About Which I Know Nothing, a title which seemed funny at the time but less so 10,000 mentions later... Here's a helpful hint if you want to be a writer: When I'm working on a first draft, all I write is 1000 words a day, which isn't that much (I started out with 300, then moved up to 500, now I can do 1000 easy). And if I write my 1000 words, I'm done for the day, even if it only took an hour (it usually takes more, of course, but not always). Novels are anywhere from 60,000 words on up, so it's possible that just sixty days later you might have a whole first draft. The Knife of Never Letting Go is 112,900 words and took about seven months to get a good first draft. Lots of rewrites followed. That's the fun part, where the book really starts to come together just exactly how you see it, the part where you feel like a real writer.Things you didn't know about Patrick Ness1. I have a tattoo of a rhinoceros. 2. I have run two marathons. 3. I am a certified scuba diver. 4. I wrote a radio comedy about vampires. 5. I have never been to New York City but... 6. I have been to Sydney, Auckland and Tokyo. 7. I was accepted into film school but turned it down to study writing. 8. I was a goth as a teenager (well, as much of a goth as you could be in Tacoma, Washington and still have to go to church every Sunday). 9. I am no longer a goth. 10. Under no circumstances will I eat onions. *******Patrick Ness is the author of the Chaos Walking trilogy. The Knife of Never Letting Go, Book One of the trilogy, won the Guardian Children's Fiction Prize and the Booktrust Teenage Prize. The Ask and The Answer, the second book in the trilogy won the Costa Children's Book Award 2009. The third book, Monsters of Men, is released in September 2010.He has also written a novel (The Crash of Hennington) and a short story collection (Topics About Which I Know Nothing) for adults, has taught Creative Writing at Oxford University, and is a literary critic for the Guardian. Born in Virginia, he lives in London.

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Birth date: January 01, 1971
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My Never Ending List
My Never Ending List rated it 3 weeks ago
I’m not quite sure how I feel about this novel. I was hoping for an emotional read, a novel that I would be thinking about for days but this novel was just ok for me. No energy charges or warm fuzzy feelings for me. I read it for what it was, a novel about a boy named Adam, who was a senior, whose l...
FatherCraneMadeMeDoIt
FatherCraneMadeMeDoIt rated it 2 months ago
This was a good book. It's not like there was anything necessarily bad about it. Cool story and a creative way of approaching the subject of loss and grief. I think my expectations were too high for it though. I had heard really great things about it and wanted to read it before seeing the movie. I ...
A Reading Vocation
A Reading Vocation rated it 3 months ago
I rarely give books five stars, but this one just gave me so many feels.I already knew that Patrick Ness is an excellent writer, at least when it comes to his YA work. But this book was staggeringly beautiful, dealing with tragedy in a way that is real and raw and not full of the melodrama or romant...
Kaethe
Kaethe rated it 4 months ago
12/31/16Nothing else was really grabbing me, you know? I saw an ad for the film Monsters of Men, which brought me to Ness and thinking it's been too long since I read it, because when I was recommending the series to Natasha as truly excellent sci fi, I couldn't remember much except lots of twists i...
Pandabearbooks
Pandabearbooks rated it 4 months ago
4,75 starsRead in one sitting, bawled my eyes out for the last third. I can't write any kind of coherent review right now, other than to say I loved it and it broke my heart.(Also, I read this as a part of a 24h readathon, of which I have four and a half hours left. What can I possibly follow this u...
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