logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
Patrick Ness
As a childI was born on an army base called Fort Belvoir, near Alexandria, Virginia, in the United States. My father was a drill sergeant in the US Army, but much nicer than that makes him seem. I only stayed at Fort Belvoir for the first four months of my life and have never even been back to... show more



As a childI was born on an army base called Fort Belvoir, near Alexandria, Virginia, in the United States. My father was a drill sergeant in the US Army, but much nicer than that makes him seem. I only stayed at Fort Belvoir for the first four months of my life and have never even been back to the East Coast of America. We moved to Hawaii, where I lived until I was almost six. I went to kindergarten there, and we used to have field trips down to Waikiki Beach. I once picked up a living sea urchin and got about a hundred needle pricks in the palm of my hand. I made up stories all the time as a kid, though I was usually too embarrassed to show them to anybody.As an adultI've only ever really wanted to be a writer. I studied English Literature at the University of Southern California, and when I graduated, I got a job as a corporate writer at a cable company in Los Angeles, writing manuals and speeches and once even an advertisement for the Gilroy, California Garlic Festival. I got my first story published in Genre magazine in 1997 and was working on my first novel, The Crash of Hennington, when I moved to London in 1999. I've lived here ever since. I taught Creative Writing at Oxford University for three years, usually to students older than I was.As an artistSo far, I've published two books for adults, a novel called The Crash of Hennington and a short story collection called Topics About Which I Know Nothing, a title which seemed funny at the time but less so 10,000 mentions later... Here's a helpful hint if you want to be a writer: When I'm working on a first draft, all I write is 1000 words a day, which isn't that much (I started out with 300, then moved up to 500, now I can do 1000 easy). And if I write my 1000 words, I'm done for the day, even if it only took an hour (it usually takes more, of course, but not always). Novels are anywhere from 60,000 words on up, so it's possible that just sixty days later you might have a whole first draft. The Knife of Never Letting Go is 112,900 words and took about seven months to get a good first draft. Lots of rewrites followed. That's the fun part, where the book really starts to come together just exactly how you see it, the part where you feel like a real writer.Things you didn't know about Patrick Ness1. I have a tattoo of a rhinoceros. 2. I have run two marathons. 3. I am a certified scuba diver. 4. I wrote a radio comedy about vampires. 5. I have never been to New York City but... 6. I have been to Sydney, Auckland and Tokyo. 7. I was accepted into film school but turned it down to study writing. 8. I was a goth as a teenager (well, as much of a goth as you could be in Tacoma, Washington and still have to go to church every Sunday). 9. I am no longer a goth. 10. Under no circumstances will I eat onions. *******Patrick Ness is the author of the Chaos Walking trilogy. The Knife of Never Letting Go, Book One of the trilogy, won the Guardian Children's Fiction Prize and the Booktrust Teenage Prize. The Ask and The Answer, the second book in the trilogy won the Costa Children's Book Award 2009. The third book, Monsters of Men, is released in September 2010.He has also written a novel (The Crash of Hennington) and a short story collection (Topics About Which I Know Nothing) for adults, has taught Creative Writing at Oxford University, and is a literary critic for the Guardian. Born in Virginia, he lives in London.

show less
Birth date: January 01, 1971
Patrick Ness's Books
Recently added on shelves
Patrick Ness's readers
Share this Author
Community Reviews
TonyTalbot
TonyTalbot rated it 2 months ago
Adam Thorn is having one of the worst days of his life. It’s also the day the queen and her faun rise from a lake and examine the life of the woman who died in her waters…The queen and the faun is only a short story, entwined very loosely with Adam’s awful day. So why is it there? I saw some places ...
Bark's Book Reviews
Bark's Book Reviews rated it 4 months ago
I had this book on my Audible app for too long and decided to listen to it for #SpringHorror and though I wouldn't consider it a true horror novel, it felt more like a dark fable/fairytale rooted in modern times, it did have some horrific elements. A young boy dealing with a whole lot of awful, is...
YA Fanatic
YA Fanatic rated it 5 months ago
I love The Chaos Walking series and Monster Calls by Patrick Ness. But I feel like, for me anyway, he's gone downhill from there. Including this book. I just haven't really liked them. I liked Adam and the fact that he is a gay protagonist. But there is a weird fantasy plotline filled in that is ...
My Never Ending List
My Never Ending List rated it 10 months ago
I’m not quite sure how I feel about this novel. I was hoping for an emotional read, a novel that I would be thinking about for days but this novel was just ok for me. No energy charges or warm fuzzy feelings for me. I read it for what it was, a novel about a boy named Adam, who was a senior, whose l...
FatherCraneMadeMeDoIt
FatherCraneMadeMeDoIt rated it 11 months ago
This was a good book. It's not like there was anything necessarily bad about it. Cool story and a creative way of approaching the subject of loss and grief. I think my expectations were too high for it though. I had heard really great things about it and wanted to read it before seeing the movie. I ...
see community reviews
Need help?